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Facebook Figured Out How To Completely Take Over Your Phone

Facebook Figured Out How To Completely Take Over Your Phone | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Last year, it took a shot at creating its own pseudo mobile operating system with Facebook Home, an Android app that replaced your home screen with a pretty stream of photos and updates from your Facebook feed. It was a dud.

Then there were the series of separate mobile apps like Poke, Camera, and Paper that have largely failed to resonate with people. Most seem to be happy with the regular Facebook app, Instagram, and Facebook Messenger.

 

But at today's F8 developers conference, Facebook unveiled some new tools that will give Facebook a deeper level of control over your phone, no matter what kind of device you use.

 

The most important one is called App Link, a tool that developers can use to help their apps and websites talk to each other.

To use Facebook's example, imagine looking up a movie review on your phone on the mobile Rotten Tomatoes site. Well, what happens if you want to use the Fandango app to buy tickets to that movie? As things stand now, you'd have to close out your browser, launch the Fandango app, and then search for the movie again. With App Link, the Rotten Tomatoes developers would be able to provide you with a link that lets you jump right into the movie's ticket page in the Fandango app. In theory, it's seamless.

That process is also called deep linking, and it's been a messy problem for app developers until now. Apple, Google, and Microsoft don't make it very easy for developers to use deep linking on their respective mobile operating systems. App Link is open for any developer to use, so over the next few months you can expect to see more and more of your apps start playing nicely with each other.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

What you offer often tells what you (want to) control.

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Leaked Document Shows AppGratis Used Lure Of App Store Rankings To Attract Cash From Developers

Leaked Document Shows AppGratis Used Lure Of App Store Rankings To Attract Cash From Developers | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Apple said it removed AppGratis for violating a clause in the iOS developer guidelines that prohibits apps from mimicking the official App Store.

But there's a disconnect between AppGratis's official statements about how it promotes apps and how it attracts developers for such promotion.

Specifically, AppGratis gives developers an estimate of where in Apple's App Store rankings an App can land based on how much the developer is willing to pay, according to a document from the company's pitch that a source in the developer community sent us.

For example, this document shows AppGratis estimates a ~$300,000 buy will land an app in the top five slot in the US version of the App Store.

Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

Looks like it is not a simplistic as a "David vs. Goliath" tale. Wrong battle?

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New Facebook for iOS changes UI (again) and limits photo uploads #fail

New Facebook for iOS changes UI (again) and limits photo uploads #fail | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

UI design is about maintaining consistency while expanding possibilities. Looks like Facebook's latest iOS update does the opposite...

 

Today facebook changed (once again) the gestures that everybody knew by now (given the high usage rate of the app), which will induce latency, friction and frustration from single handed, zero attention span millions of users.

 

But maybe one can see some wisdom in such choices, that over time may be progressively forgotten.

 

More frustrating are some feature reductions, namely in the photo area of the app that now longer allows posting pictures that are not in the camera roll.

 

For instance, it is no longer possible to enrich a post with a photo picked in an existing album, including the photostream. This is a big restriction in terms of features and UI, with no understandable reason.

 

Please voice your comments and reactions.

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Facebook Just Updated Its iPhone And iPad Apps With Some Must-Have Features

Facebook Just Updated Its iPhone And iPad Apps With Some Must-Have Features | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

Beyond an impressive (and long awaited) speed and UX improvement, facebook's last iOS release raises the HTML5 vs.native apps debate to a whole new level

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Paid Apps Are Dead

Paid Apps Are Dead | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

In-app may be the only path unless you have a massive audience and can sustain ads

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Microsoft balks at Apple’s 30% fee, leaving SkyDrive and apps that integrate with it in the lurch on iOS

Microsoft balks at Apple’s 30% fee, leaving SkyDrive and apps that integrate with it in the lurch on iOS | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it
Microsoft and Apple are currently locked in something of a Cold War over the future of SkyDrive in the iOS App Store.

Sources close to Microsoft have detailed to TNW a difficult, and perhaps unresolvable situation between the two companies that underscores the difficulty with certain Apple rules concerning its app marketplace, and how far the company is willing to go to protect its vaunted 30% cut of in-app revenues.

The difficulty began when Microsoft rolled out the ability for SkyDrive users to purchase more storage space on the service. From that point, the company was not permitted to update its application in the iOS App Store.

The reason? It doesn’t pay Apple a 30% cut of subscription revenue generated by the application through the paid, additional storage. Microsoft, TNW has learned, has a new version of the application ready to go, including a key bug fix that would rectify a crashing bug, but cannot get it through.

Microsoft does not appear keen to pay Apple the 30% cut, as it lasts in perpetuity, regardless of whether a user continues to use an iOS device or not, as the billing is through their Apple account.

Therefore, if a user signed up for a few additional gigabytes on their iOS device, and then moved to Android or Windows Phone or not phone at all, for the length of their account, Apple would collect 30% of their fee for storage. This hasn’t sat well with Microsoft.

Microsoft has persisted in trying to work out a compromise with Apple, but has thus far failed to come to an agreement. The company offered to remove all subscription options from its application, leaving it a non-revenue generating experience on iOS. The offer was rebuffed.

If a service has a subscription option, it seems, and it is not listed in the iOS store, the application cannot, and will not be allowed. That is, unless you are small enough that Apple doesn’t bothers to check. I assume that smaller companies could slip under the radar.
Philippe J DEWOST's insight:

This is getting somewhat ugly

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Retailers introduce indoor navigation in apps

Retailers introduce indoor navigation in apps | cross pond high tech | Scoop.it

"Mobile brings the (online store) to the store." : according to Walmart about 15% of page views for their mobile app come from shoppers in stores.

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