Crop yield
497 views | +5 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi alter plant productivity. Over 10 years with nearly 80 collaborators, we compiled data on the response of plant biomass to mycorrhizal fungal inoculation, including meta-analysis metrics and 24 additional explanatory variables that describe the biotic and abiotic context of each study. We also include phylogenetic trees for all plants and fungi in the database. To our knowledge, MycoDB is the largest ecological meta-analysis database. We aim to share these data to highlight significant gaps in mycorrhizal research and encourage synthesis to explore the ecological and evolutionary generalities that govern mycorrhizal functioning in ecosystems.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

ODC colloidal chitosan biopesticide approved

ODC colloidal chitosan biopesticide approved | Crop yield | Scoop.it
AgriHouse's YEA! Foliar & Irrigation Solution  chitosan formula for vegetables and fruits for agricultural and home & garden use was approved in June 2009.  YEA! Foliar & Irrigation can be applied directly on leaves, roots, stems and flowers of vegetables and fruits by spraying or irrigation.  It can be mixed for drip and overhead irrigation as well. The micro molecular chitosan…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

More Expensive Than Gold, Cocaine, or Heroin -- New Class Of Hydroponics Hormones Pushing Outer Fringes of Plant Science For Bigger Yielding Crops

More Expensive Than Gold, Cocaine, or Heroin -- New Class Of Hydroponics Hormones Pushing Outer Fringes of Plant Science For Bigger Yielding Crops | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Advanced Nutrients Testing Astronomically-Priced Plant Growth Regulators (PRWeb September 17, 2008) Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/hydroponics/plant_science/prweb1336274.htm
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Digital farming could spell shake-up for crop chemicals sector

Digital farming could spell shake-up for crop chemicals sector | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Global pesticides, seeds and fertilizer companies may be forced to re-engineer their business models as farmers adopt specialist technology that helps maximize harvests while reducing the use of crop chemicals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

What are the Biggest Agricultural Benefits of Humic Material?

What are the Biggest Agricultural Benefits of Humic Material? | Crop yield | Scoop.it
There are a lot of things for growers to love about humic material. As research and customer experience have taught us again and again, using humates carefully can lead to bigger, stronger crops – even in environments where soil density and conditions aren't perfect. In fact, we think the results say more about humic acid than the details ever could. Here are just a few of the biggest agricultural benefits of Black Earth humic material: 1. Better soil quality. More and more farmers across the world are having to deal with physically degraded and nutritionally depleted soil. By adding humic material, we can help you keep yours firm, packed, and nutrient-rich. Because our products work alongside fertilizers and other additives, you don't have to worry about changing the other products and techniques you already use. 2. Stronger roots and stronger plants. Because humic material can increase water retention across many different types of soil, plants can grow stronger both above and below the surface. That means bigger yields and more weather and disease-resistant plant life. 3. Fewer toxins in growing soil. The different acids and enzymes that can be found in humic material are great for taking salt, pesticides, and other toxins out of soil and letting you grow healthier plants. That's especially important if you have been heavily farming and treating your fields with inputs consisting of environmental contaminants. 4. Improved microbial growth and nutrient absorption. Humic material helps plants to take advantage of phosphates and nutrients that are already in your soil. Additionally, they spur microbial growth, which can be helpful for crop yields in any kind of soil or environment. These are great benefits for any farm or agricultural operation, of course, but we've already pointed out that results matter the most, and there isn't any way for you to really know until you've tried it for yourself. We invite you to call a member of our team today to request a sample and see what a difference we can make on your yield this season. (function(){ var s='hubspotutk',r,c=((r=new RegExp('(^|; )'+s+'=([^;]*)').exec(document.cookie))?r[2]:''),w=window;w[s]=w[s]||c, hsjs=document.createElement("script"),el=document.getElementById("hs-cta-5565c748-a842-4122-b843-c6fca3c4f1ae"); hsjs.type = "text/javascript";hsjs.async = true; hsjs.src = "//cta-service-cms2.hubspot.com/cs/loader.js?pg=5565c748-a842-4122-b843-c6fca3c4f1ae&pid=148034&hsutk=" + encodeURIComponent(c); (document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0]||document.getElementsByTagName("body")[0]).appendChild(hsjs); try{el.style.visibility="hidden";}catch(err){} setTimeout(function() {try{el.style.visibility="visible";}catch(err){}}, 2500); })();
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

On the Move: Hungry Plants Actively Seek Nutrients in Rock Minerals

On the Move: Hungry Plants Actively Seek Nutrients in Rock Minerals | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Just 25-cents when it was published, the May 1948 issue of Popular Mechanics is filled with advertisements and articles from a very different era. (You can view an online copy of the magazine here.) One article, titled “Hungry Plants Guide the Ore Prospector (pp. 130-133),” begins like this: “Flowers make a tireless search for valuable... The post On the Move: Hungry Plants Actively Seek Nutrients in Rock Minerals appeared first on Cascade Minerals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Proteinates for Animal and Plant Health

Proteinates for Animal and Plant Health | Crop yield | Scoop.it
How Proteinates Support Plant and Animal Growth? Proteinates are organic compounds obtained through chelation of metallic irons and amino acids. These are extracted using different methodologies and added as plant and animal nutritious supportive ingredient. Chelated Minerals Chelated minerals are useful animal nutrition supplement and they protect the nutritious properties of animal feeds. They form […]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Plant Signaling: HY5 Synchronizes Resource Supply

A new report shows that the HY5 transcription factor moves from shoots to roots in plants, mediating light regulation of root growth and nitrate uptake. This finding offers not only a mechanistic insight into shoot–root communication, but also scope for increasing crop yields.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Practical Applications of Biochar in the Landscape

Practical Applications of Biochar in the Landscape | Crop yield | Scoop.it
by Dr. Hugh McLaughlin and Keegan Pyle There’s a lot of buzz about biochar these days. And for good reason. Incorporating quality biochar into soil increases the abundance of soil microorganisms, soil nutrient retention and water storage, and soil carbon content. Biochar is a relatively new term for charcoal used as a soil additive. However, […]
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

A microbe-dependent world: studying the legume-rhizobia symbiosis for a more sustainable future

A microbe-dependent world: studying the legume-rhizobia symbiosis for a more sustainable future | Crop yield | Scoop.it
One group of bacteria, rhizobia, are soil-dwelling and underappreciated powerhouses of agricultural productivity. These bacteria form a specialized relationship with leguminous plants (soybean, bean, lentils, peanuts, etc.) in which they supply nitrogen, a globally limiting resource, in exchange for carbon. When undisturbed, this interaction naturally increases soil nitrogen content. Agricultural soils are frequently nitrogen limited which causes farmers to deposit approximately 80 million tons of nitrogen fertilizers on agricultural fields each year! This practice has resulted in increased crop yields at the expense of the environment. Toxic algal blooms pollute water sources, microbial communities have been destroyed, fossil fuels are burned to produce the fertilizers, and gaseous nitrogen compounds are released into the atmosphere as consequences of modern fertilizer production and use. Fortunately, the relationship between legumes and rhizobia offers an opportunity to offset the excessive use of fertilizers and begin shifting away from these environmentally detrimental practices.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Working with rhizobia

Working with rhizobia | Crop yield | Scoop.it
This manual brings together state-of-the-art methods for the study of root-nodule bacteria, both in the free-living state and in symbiosis with legumes.

In each chapter, the manual introduces a topic and provides guidance on how study of the symbiosis might best be tackled.

Detailed descriptions of the protocols that need to be followed, potential problems and pitfalls are provided. Topics covered include acquiring, recognising, growing and storing rhizobia, experimenting with strains in the laboratory, glasshouse and field, and applying contemporary molecular and genetic methodologies to assist in the study of rhizobia.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, April 28, 11:49 PM

Awesome... You can download the manual freely.

Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Mycorrhizae Unveiled!

http://www.holganix.com One of the secrets to an awesome lawn is a little-known fungus called mycorrhizae. What is this and why is it so special? There ar

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Association of plant growth-promoting Serratia spp. with the root nodules of chickpea.

Serratia species-affiliated DNA sequences have recently been discovered in the root nodules of two chickpea cultivars; however, little is known about their potential influence on chickpea plant growth. All Serratia-affiliated sequences (1136) could be grouped into two clusters at 98 % DNA similarity. The major cluster, represented by 96 % of sequences, was closely associated with Serratia marcescens sequences from GenBank. In the current study, we isolated two Serratia strains, 5D and RTL100, from root nodules of a field-grown Desi cultivar from Faisalabad and Thal areas, respectively. In vitro, strain 5D showed significantly higher phosphate (P) solubilization and lactic acid production than RTL100, whereas a comparable concentration of phytohormone was produced by both isolates. The application of Serratia strain 5D as an inoculum resulted in 25.55 % and 30.85 % increases in the grain yield of crops grown on fertile soil in irrigated areas and nutrient-deficient soil in rainfed areas, respectively, compared to the non-inoculated control. Results of plant inoculations indicated that Serratia sp. 5D and RTL100 can serve as effective microbial inoculants, particularly in nutrient-deficient soils in rainfed areas, where chickpea is the only major crop grown during the entire year.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Soil Health | NRCS

Soil Health | NRCS | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Soil is a living and life-giving natural resource. 

As world population and food production demands rise, keeping our soil healthy and productive is of paramount importance. By farming using soil health principles and systems that include no-till, cover cropping and diverse rotations, more and more farmers are actually increasing their soil’s organic matter and improving microbial activity. As a result, farmers are sequestering more carbon, increasing water infiltration, improving wildlife and pollinator habitat—all while harvesting better profits and often better yields.

The resources on this soil health section of our site are designed to help visitors understand the basics and benefits of soil health—and to learn about Soil Health Management Systems from farmers who are using those systems.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Effects of drought stress and super absorbent polymer on susceptibility of pepper to damage ...

Effects of drought stress and super absorbent polymer on susceptibility of pepper to damage ... | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Pepper plant Capsicum annuum L. has great nutritional value and many pharmaceutical properties but its sensitivity to pests such as Aphis gossypii Glover, especially in drought stress conditions, has limited its production. To evaluate the effect of drought stress on the population and damage rate of this pest in greenhouse condition, four moisture treatments including; full irrigation, 15, 30 and 45 percent of water deficit, and four treatments with different amounts of super absorbent polymer (SAP) containing 2, 4, 6 and 8 g per pot were separately performed in completely randomized design. Four weeks after applying drought stress, the pots were moved near the aphid sources. Density of aphids was examined after one month of infestation, and the plant growth characteristics after two months. It was found that the increase in severe drought stress (45% DI45) significantly raised the population of this pest and remarkably decreased plant growth rate and yield. However, the low stress of drought (15% DI15) not only caused relative reduction of insect’s population, but also saved water consumption and increased crop yield. However, the insect population was elevated as a result of increase in the amount of irrigation. Although the excessive use of SAP (8 g) increased the aphid population, the current experiment showed the use of 4 and 6 g of super absorbents could minimize the irrigation stress, decrease the pest population and improve yield of the plants by retaining the moisture in drought conditions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Molecular Identification and Characterization of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas sp. ...

Molecular Identification and Characterization of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas sp. ... | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Bio-inoculants have potential role in plant growth promotion. The present study evaluated the potential of Pseudomonas strains as bio-inoculants in wheat on the basis of plant growth promotion and physiological characterization. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that four isolated strains belonged to genus Pseudomonas. These strains were positive for phosphorus solubilization and indole acetic acid production, whereas only two strains were positive candidate for their nitrogen fixing ability as determined by presence or absence of nifH gene through amplification from polymerase chain reaction. The pot experiment showed that the integrated use of Pseudomonas strains as co-inoculant and 50% applied mineral fertilizers enhanced the maximum wheat growth and development from 58 to 140% for different shoot and root growth parameters. The strain NCCP-45 and NCCP-237 were closely related to Pseudomonas beteli and Pseudomonas lini, respectively. These isolated strains can be used to increase crop productivity by using as a bio-fertilizer inoculum.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Established Company Delivers Organic Inputs and Fertilizers for Soil Fertility

Established Company Delivers Organic Inputs and Fertilizers for Soil Fertility | Crop yield | Scoop.it
‘Agriculture is the backbone of Indian economy’. But due to challenges constantly coming its way, many wrong practices has led to degradation of soil, crop, animal productivity, human health and climate degradation as a whole. But to suppress wrong practices with natural practices that helps sustain good agricultural productivity, companies like Suraj Shree Chemicals Ltd (SSCL) have existed over the years. This company is one of the most trusted enterprises for Indian farmers as it does not just deliver agro based products but helps educate farmers for better productivity following best natural steps. The company offers fully dedicated organic and cost effective solutions to farmers. The company puts emphasis on usage of organic input for organic agriculture. Farmers get benefited highly with this company’s solutions as they offer cost reduction solutions as well as optimal utilization of resources to farmers. The effort of the company is to deliver fully organic answers for both agriculture and animal feeding and maintenance system. The company adds more valuable products to its chart that focuses on organic focused policy driven ideas. Adopting such ideas will target to maximize farmer benefits to the utmost. Crop yields can be doubled with the help of proper utilization of fertilizers and this fertilizer should be organic fertilizer and not synthetic fertilizers that damages soil completely. SSCL being an advocate of organic agriculture, provides farmers with organic based fertilizers whose application to agriculture turns out beneficial in the following ways-Offers optimum level of phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients to plantsEnhances plant growth and plant yieldImproves the health and soil fertility manifoldApplication of bio fertilizer ensure healthy environment for future generationsCrop grown with the help of bio fertilizers are considered healthierBio fertilizer offers protection to crops against any disease and insect pestHelps in the uptake of soil nutrients more effectively Multiple application benefit of organic fertilizer on crops does not imply farmers use it on crops at unlimited scale. Measurement or composition level of each organic Agri-product must to be informed to the farmers if the target is of promising role in agricultural development. Suraj Shree Chemicals Ltd being a trusted partner of Farmers over the years can assist one in this area. The company delivers all products which are tested and verified at leading Agri-universities. They understand the value of chemical free inputs that assures chemical free output for human consumption for both human and environment health.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

MORINGA .....MIRACLE TREE PART2

MORINGA .....MIRACLE TREE PART2 | Crop yield | Scoop.it
HEALTH BENEFITS OF MORINGA PART 2 Immunosuppressive Effects: The seeds of moringa oleifera possess immunosuppressive properties. Deliberate immunosuppression is required to inhibit the activation of body’s immune system in order to prevent the rejection of certain treatments, particularly organ transplants and autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Research studies have demonstrated that the immunosuppressive action of moringa seeds helps in ameliorating the production of antibodies to allow for the new organs and transplanted material to settle safely in the body. Herpes: TheMoringa herb is effective against the infection caused by herpes simplex virus. The healing effects of moringa herb prevent the development of skin lesions and inhibit the formation of plaque caused by the infecting virus. Cardiovascular Protection: Moringa extracts are helpful in the prevention of myocardial or cardiac damage, due to the presence of powerful antioxidants. Research studies conducted on this subject have provided supporting evidence that proves the antiperoxidative and cardio-protective effects of moringa therapy. Treatment with Moringa helps in inhibiting the increase in lipid perioxidation in the myocardial tissue and aids in maintaining a healthy heart. Anti-allergenic Behavior: Extracts of moringa seeds possess anti-allergenic qualities. Scientific research has validated the inhibitory action of moringa on the hypersensitive reactions involved in various allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Asthma: The benefits of moringa plant extracts also include relief from bronchial asthma and inflammation caused in the airways. According to research, treatment with moringa helps to reduce the severity of asthmatic attacks and various symptoms such as wheezing, cough, dyspnea and tightness of the chest. Moringa extends its protective effects against bronchial constrictions and encourages better lung function and respirationWater Purification: Moringa olefeira extracts possess anti-cyanobacterial qualities and have been praised for their use in primitive water filtration systems. Moringa seeds work as a coagulant and exert flocculating effects on the clay and microorganisms present in water, thereby aiding in the removal of harmful pollutants and algae. Moringa is a natural way of purifying and treating water, in contrast to other industrial coagulants such as alumina. Seed Oil: Moringa seed oil has a low tendency to become rancid and is effectively used as a lubricant for fine apparatus such as watches. Feed for Farm Animals: Leaves of moringa trees possess excellent nutritional characteristics and are beneficial for cattle feed, both economically and nutritionally. Moringa promotes better milk production and helps to improve the quality of the meat. Plant Growth Stimulator: Extracts from moringa leaves contain growth-enhancing properties and promote a better yield of the crop. Use of moringa growth hormone helps in improving the resistance of plants towards pests and diseases. Moringa extracts have been extensively used in the manufacturing of creams, ointments, oils and moisturizers. Moringa seed cake remaining after the extraction of the oil is commonly used as a fertilizer. MORINGA CONSUMPTION /SIDE EFFECT Moringa is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth and used appropriately. The leaves, fruit, and seeds might be safe when eaten as food. However, it’s important to avoid eating the root and its extracts. These parts of the plant may contain a toxic substance that can cause paralysis and death. Moringa has been used safely in doses up to 6 grams daily for up to 3 weeks. There isn’t enough information to know if moringa is safe when used in medicinal amounts. Special Precautions & Warnings: Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s LIKELY UNSAFE to use the root, bark or flowers of moringa if you are pregnant. Chemicals in the root, bark, and flowers can make the uterus contract, and this might cause a miscarriage. There is not enough information available about the safety of using other parts of moringa during pregnancy. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Moringa-Root-Bark can be used for poor circulation, to increase appetite and stimulate digestive system and as a mild tonic. A paste from the mature root powder is externally used in palsy, rheumatism, enlargement of spleen, dyspepsia and insect bites. In such conditions; the root bark is ground and mixed with salt to form a poultice which is applied on an affected area. Internally; Moringa-Root-Bark powder is taken for intermittent fevers, paralytic affections, epilepsy and hysteria. You can make a decoction in combination with Asafoetida and a little amount of Himalaya salt, and then give a half cup to a patient, once daily for 45 days. For otalgia (earache); fresh juice or an infusion out of the root-bark is used as an ear drop. For toothache; powdered bark decoction can be gaggled. For local swellings; a poultice of fresh root bark of the young tree is applied externally. NOTE The moringa leaves are said to contain two times the protein present in milk. Bananas are a rich source of potassium. But moringa leaves contain several times more potassium than bananas. Along with potassium, zinc is also found in large quantities in moringa
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Effective Microorganisms: Using Bacteria and Yeast to Create Sustainable Agriculture

Effective Microorganisms: Using Bacteria and Yeast to Create Sustainable Agriculture | Crop yield | Scoop.it
An intimate understanding of the local ecology is necessary for successful agriculture—and it may be important to extend this knowledge to the smallest of lifeforms. According to Dr. Teruo Higa, a proponent of natural, sustainable, chemical-free farming, soil treated with beneficial microorganisms can produce healthier, more productive plants. To this end, he has created a proprietary mixture of beneficial bacteria and yeast called Effective Microorganisms (EM). Although the scientific jury is still out on its effectiveness, its potential is great for vastly increasing food yields while reducing chemical pollutants in the environment. {readmorelink}Read on…{/readmorelink}
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

The effect of biofield energy of Mahendra Trivedi was tested
on...

The effect of biofield energy of Mahendra Trivedi was tested<br/>on... | Crop yield | Scoop.it
The effect of biofield energy of Mahendra Trivedi was tested on a variety of sponge gourd (Luffa cylindrica) and bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) seeds through Morphological and Molecular Analysis using RAPD. The seeds of each crop were divided into two groups, one was kept control, while the other group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’ biofield energy treatment. In conclusion, Mr. Trivedi’s biofield energy treatment showed the ability to alter the plant growth rate that may by interacting with plant genome, which resulted in high yield of crops.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Growth surge will require strong regulation

Growth surge will require strong regulation | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Cereal crops checked by the cold start to spring, are expected to leap forward with the onset of warmer weather and rising soil temperatures.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Paul Laski
Scoop.it!

Bioherbicides in Organic Horticulture

Bioherbicides in Organic Horticulture | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Abstract: Organic horticulture producers rank weeds as one of their most troublesome, time-consuming, and costly production problems. With the increasing The post Bioherbicides in Organic Horticulture appeared first on What we do now echoes in eternity..
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Isolation and characterization of culturable seed-associated bacterial endophytes from gnotobiotically grown Marama bean seedlings

Marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) is an indigenous non-nodulating legume to the arid agro-ecological parts of Southern Africa. It is a staple food for the Khoisan and Bantu people from these areas. It is intriguing how it is able to synthesize the high protein content in the seeds since its natural habitat is nitrogen-deficient. The aim of the study was to determine the presence of seed-transmittable bacterial endophytes that may have growth promoting effects, which may be particularly important for the harsh conditions. Marama bean seeds were surface sterilized and gnotobiotically grown to 2 weeks old seedlings. From surface-sterilized shoots and roots, 123 distinct bacterial isolates were cultured using three media, and identified by BOX-PCR fingerprinting and sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes. Phylogenetic analyses of 73 putative endophytes assigned them to bacterial species from 14 genera including Proteobacteria (Rhizobium, Massilia, Kosakonia, Pseudorhodoferax, Caulobacter, Pantoea, Sphingomonas, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium), Firmicutes (Bacillus), Actinobacteria (Curtobacterium, Microbacterium) and Bacteroidetes (Mucilaginibacter, Chitinophaga). Screening for plant growth-promoting activities revealed that the isolates showed production of IAA, ACC deaminase, siderophores, endoglucanase, protease, AHLs, and capacities to solubilize phosphate and fix nitrogen. This is the first report that marama bean seeds may harbor endophytes that can be cultivated from seedlings; in this community of bacteria, physiological characteristics that are potentially plant growth promoting are widespread.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Application of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) for enhanced crop growth

Application of Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) for enhanced crop growth | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Soil harbors several beneficial microorganisms and some of them colonize in the rhizospheric zone and enhance plant growth. Such bacteria are generally designated as PGPR (Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacteria). Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) was first defined by Kloepper and Schrot  to describe soil bacteria that colonize the roots of plants following inoculation onto seed and that enhance plant growth.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Laski from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
Scoop.it!

Brazil-UK partnership to improve energy and food security through nitrogen fixation | The James Hutton Institute

Brazil-UK partnership to improve energy and food security through nitrogen fixation | The James Hutton Institute | Crop yield | Scoop.it
Scientists in Brazil and the UK are joining forces to help solve urgent food and energy security issues in South America's most populous country, by establishing a virtual centre that will investigate how to reduce the use of fertilisers and engineer nitrogen fixation - a biological process essential for all forms of life on the planet – in food and energy crops.

The project, led in the UK by the John Innes Centre and including researchers based at the James Hutton Institute in Dundee, will carry out world-class research on biological nitrogen fixation to increase scientific knowledge, with the aim of introducing changes in agricultural practices in Brazil.

Professor Euan James, from the James Hutton Institute’s Ecological Sciences group, said: “Nitrogen is one of the essential building blocks of life as we know it. It amounts to about 79% of the air we breathe, but the vast majority of living organisms cannot access nitrogen directly, so it has to be made available to them, or ‘fixed’, by micro-organisms.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
more...
No comment yet.