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Administrators should work with the faculty to assess learning the right way - @insidehighered

Administrators should work with the faculty to assess learning the right way -  @insidehighered | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

From Academica Top Ten 10 November 2014

Admin should not treat faculty as the enemy on assessment

Faculty should not be thought of as the enemy when it comes to making improvements to assessments of student learning, says an article in Inside Higher Ed. The article argues that while a minority of faculty may resist change without any good reason, administrators too often treat assessment as a neutral activity, reducible to the simple collection of data. However, when assessment is used to determine faculty effectiveness and to assess whether or what students are learning, it becomes a practice of management, not pedagogy. Such a move marks a significant shift in power, the article says; moreover, the demand that assessment data be used to modify programs can have a significant impact on program curricula in which faculty have invested significant time and resources. The article argues that a belief in the neutrality of data-driven assessment can lead to a condescending attitude toward faculty, when what is actually needed is collaboration with faculty and an awareness of why faculty members’ may be critical of some assessment measures. Inside Higher Ed

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Stigamatization and Attitudes Towards Mental Illness - Learning to Live With the Voices in Your Head

Stigamatization and Attitudes Towards Mental Illness - Learning to Live With the Voices in Your Head | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Some experts think the problem is how doctors and society treat people who hear things, not the voices themselves.
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Halloween costumes that mock mental illness are a matter for the market – PM, UK

Halloween costumes that mock mental illness are a matter for the market – PM, UK | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Downing Street responds to health minister Norman Lamb’s criticism of ‘psycho’ and ‘schizo’ joke outfits available online
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"We've got six of the things" - Russian soccer coach says he won’t sign any black players over Ebola fears

"We've got six of the things" - Russian soccer coach says he won’t sign any black players over Ebola fears | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
DONESTK, Ukraine – The coach of Russian Premier League team FC Rostov said on Saturday that he would not sign any more black footballers over fears that they would bring with them the deadly Ebola virus.

Igor Gamula told Russian media that the soccer club had “enough dark-skinned players; we’ve got six of the things” when asked by a reporter if he would sign Cameroon defender Benoit Angbwa, the Associated Press reported.
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To Teach Facts, Start with Feelings

To Teach Facts, Start with Feelings | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Students are more likely to engage in learning if you present the material in the context of a story conveying emotions that they can understand.
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UK University of Warwick backs down on suspension of Prof Thomas Docherty for sighing and irony @insidehighered

UK University of Warwick backs down on suspension of Prof Thomas Docherty for sighing and irony @insidehighered | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
October 27, 2014By Scott Jaschik

"While American universities debate whether "civility" is an appropriate way to evaluate faculty members, a British institution has faced intense criticism for punishing a faculty member for sighing, unfriendly body language and the use of irony.

"The University of Warwick has now backed down and dropped all charges against Thomas Docherty (at right), a professor of English who is known for his criticism of the the use of corporate approaches in higher education. But the case has set off a broad debate over how administrators respond to criticism, and over the vulnerability of professors who speak out. Others have said it points to the arbitrary nature of punishments in academe, given that if every professor who sighed or used irony ended up suspended, there might be a lot of empty departments in Britain and elsewhere.

"Docherty's suspension was revealed by Times Higher Education, which reported that the university said he was undermining the authority of his department head (who has since stepped down) by making "ironic" comments during job interviews, sighing and using negative body language. The suspension had Docherty banned from contact with anyone on campus, and even from writing a book preface."

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Why Steven Harper is the Real Threat to Canadian National Security » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names

Why Steven Harper is the Real Threat to Canadian National Security » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Why Steven Harper is the Real Threat to Canadian National Security
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Philanthropy vs. Democracy? Self interests jeopardized health-care to shield the rich from taxation.

Philanthropy vs. Democracy? Self interests jeopardized health-care to shield the rich from taxation. | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Progressives are hypersensitive to way the big money in politics perpetuates advantage and inequality, but seem blind to the dangers posed by largely unaccountable donors.
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Study suggests experiential learning provides increased student engagement along with higher workload

Study suggests experiential learning provides increased student engagement along with higher workload | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary by Academica Top Ten 30 October 2014

"A new report released by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) has found that courses that incorporate experiential learning with community organizations resulted in higher student engagement and better outcomes, but they also created more work for students and instructors. The study, conducted by researchers at York University, examined a variety of introductory and upper-level courses that made use of community service learning (CSL), community-based learning (CBL), and other in-course learning activities (ICLA) such as role playing, skits, guest speakers, case studies, and laboratories. Students reported improved engagement with the materials and a recognition of strong educational outcomes, but they also rated CSL and CBL courses lower than ICLA courses due to “increased workload and a lack of clarity on the goals and standards of the course.” Faculty involved in the study reported increased workloads, but recognized that the courses “offered a deeply rewarding and personally transformative student learning experience.” The report’s authors suggest that institutional supports and incentives for faculty can help alleviate some of the increased workload and can help them establish and maintain community partnerships." HEQCO Summary | Full Report
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Omar Khadr - Child Soldier: Misguided security laws take a human toll

Omar Khadr - Child Soldier: Misguided security laws take a human toll | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"I was apprehended by U.S. forces during a firefight in Afghanistan in July 2002. I was only 15 years old at the time, propelled into the middle of armed conflict I did not understand or want. I was detained first at the notorious U.S. air base at Bagram, Afghanistan; and then I was imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay for close to 10 years. I have now been held in Canadian jails for the past two years.

"From the very beginning, to this day, I have never been accorded the protection I deserve as a child soldier. And I have been through so many other human rights violations. I was held for years without being charged. I have been tortured and ill-treated. I have suffered through harsh prison conditions. And I went through an unfair trial process that sometimes felt like it would never end.

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Cocoa Constitutents Fend Off Senior Moments—the Memory of a 30-Year-Old? | Talking back, Scientific American Blog Network

Cocoa Constitutents Fend Off Senior Moments—the Memory of a 30-Year-Old? | Talking back, Scientific American Blog Network | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Scott Small, a professor of neurology at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, researches Alzheimer’s, but he also studies the memory loss that occurs during the normal aging process. Research on the commonplace “senior moments” focuses on the hippocampus, an area of the brain involved with formation of new memories.  In particular, one area of the hippocampus, the dentate gyrus, which helps distinguish one object from another, has lured researchers on age-related memory problems.

"In a study by Small and colleagues published Oct. 26 in Nature Neuroscience, naturally occurring chemicals in cocoa increased dentate gyrus blood flow. Psychological testing showed that the pattern recognition abilities of a typical 60-year-old on a high dose of the cocoa phytochemicals in the 37-person study matched those of a 30-or 40-year old after three months. The study received support from the food company Mars, but Small cautions against going out to gorge on Snickers Bars, as most of the beneficial chemicals, or flavanols, are removed when processing cocoa."

This article is an edited transcript of an interview with Small.

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Doug Ford still hasn’t released pre-election donor list | Toronto Star

Doug Ford still hasn’t released pre-election donor list | Toronto Star | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Despite a promise to disclose his donor information after Tory did so Saturday afternoon, Doug Ford still had not released the list late Saturday evening.

"Ford spoke emphatically last week about the importance of pre-election donor disclosure, saying it should be made mandatory rather than voluntary.

"This week, he said he would only issue his list after rival John Tory issued his. WhenTory did issue his early Saturday afternoon, Ford said his own would be out “within the hour,” as soon as he could call the campaign’s chief financial officer.

"Three hours later, his spokesman said they were compiling the information. Ten hours later, it was still not out. He told CP24 then that it would be out either late at night or first thing Sunday morning.

Olivia Chow released her list on Wednesday. On Saturday morning, she criticized Tory and Ford for waiting so long. Candidates have usually released their lists between four days and a week before voting day."

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The times, they are (always) a-changin’ - so do schools and education | University Affairs

The times, they are (always) a-changin’ - so do schools and education | University Affairs | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The times, they are (always) a-changin’

From Academica Top Ten 20 November 2014

Mainstream calls for change in PSE often shallow, reductive
An article by York University PhD candidate Melonie Fullick examines the ways in which calls for change in education typically get reported. Fullick, who researches PSE policy and its effects on universities, says that mainstream coverage of many issues tends toward a “shallow narrative of universities as institutions that simply have not changed, either over the course of the last century or even since Medieval times.” She argues that such reporting ignores the vibrant work being done in PSE teaching and learning; she also says that calls for changes in pedagogy often ignore the background of what makes change succeed or fail. Moreover, the problems cited in such work frequently reflect changes that are taking place on campus even as they criticize a lack of change. “Universities already have changed … It’s just that they’ve never changed enough for the present moment. Thus we keep charging them with the task of changing more … for a broadening range of purposes,” Fullick writes. A better question, she says, isn’t whether institutions will change, but how they will change, and for whom. University Affairs

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Social Inequality and Closing the Achievement Gap - Is Lecturing Culturally Biased?

Social Inequality and Closing the Achievement Gap - Is Lecturing Culturally Biased? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Studies suggest that replacing the lecture-hall model with an active learning model can help close the achievement gap between students of different cultural backgrounds.
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A Teacher Planning Model For Multiple Intelligences

A Teacher Planning Model For Multiple Intelligences | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

A Teacher Planning Model For Multiple Intelligences

by TeachThought Staff

 

"Until recently, the prevailing thought in education was that differentiation according the theory of multiple intelligences was a good thing.

"Then data started coming out, and the theories Howard Gardner set forth back in 1983 came under fire. Mention multiple intelligence (MI) thinking today, and you’re guaranteed to rise the ire of someone on twitter telling you that it’s 2014, and the 1980s are gone and there is no data that exists that proves MI does anything but waste time.

 

"The Background

"Gardner’s theory was more about rethinking intelligence than suggesting we teach algebra by jump roping. He suggested 8 sects of intelligence replace our singular idea of general intelligence. (He has since suggested a 9th intelligence–Existential)."

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Angela Davis writes: From Michael Brown to Assata Shakur, the racist state of America persists

Angela Davis writes: From Michael Brown to Assata Shakur, the racist state of America persists | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Angela Davis: Those who resist are treated like terrorists – as in Ferguson this year, and as I and other black activists were in the 60s and 70s
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Canada Accused of Failing to Prevent Overseas Mining Abuses | Inter Press Service

Canada Accused of Failing to Prevent Overseas Mining Abuses | Inter Press Service | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Far too often, extractive companies have double-standards in how they behave at home versus abroad.” -- Alex Blair of Oxfam America

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Doctors make mistakes. Can we talk about that?

Doctors make mistakes. Can we talk about that? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Every doctor makes mistakes. But, says physician Brian Goldman, medicine's culture of denial (and shame) keeps doctors from ever talking about those mistakes, or using them to learn and improve. Telling stories from his own long practice, he calls on doctors to start talking about being wrong.

(Filmed at TEDxToronto.)
iPamba's insight:

Dr. Brian Goldman reminds us that we all make mistakes. There's no shame in that. What's important is to learn, improve, and share what we have learned from our mistakes. 

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Havana's Latin American Medical School trains global physicians to serve local communities with the most need

Havana's Latin American Medical School trains global physicians to serve local communities with the most need | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Big problems need big solutions, sparked by big ideas, imagination and audacity. In this talk, journalist Gail Reed profiles one big solution worth noting: Havana’s Latin American Medical School, which trains global physicians to serve the local communities that need them most.
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Stop Complaining About Your Professors’ Lack of Classroom Tech. Sit and Think a Little.

Stop Complaining About Your Professors’ Lack of Classroom Tech. Sit and Think a Little. | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Lucas Matney, a junior at Northwestern University and columnist for the Daily Northwestern, is concerned that his school is not adequately preparing him for the challenges of today. In his experience, he says, “very few” of his professors “have used technology in the classroom in a way that offers a...
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Netanyahu insists he is 'under attack for defending Israel' after remarks from US official

Netanyahu insists he is 'under attack for defending Israel' after remarks from US official | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Quotes from senior Obama administration figures damn Israeli prime minister over stance on settlements and Palestinian peace
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Faculty associations at the crossroads | Academic Matters

Faculty associations at the crossroads | Academic Matters | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary by Academica Top Ten 28 October 2014

Faculty associations must change course to meet new challenges in PSE
An article in Academic Matters, published on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations, considers the past and future role of faculty associations in Canadian PSE. Authors Stephanie Ross and Larry Savage argue that recent transformations in the structure of the university mean that faculty associations are more vital than ever; however, faculty associations must change to meet new challenges. Ross and Savage say that increased competitive pressures and a move toward a corporate approach to university governance have led to the marginalization of faculty in the decision-making process as well as an increase in precarious, contract- or project-based teaching and research positions. They say that it is incumbent upon faculty associations to move past a “tried and true approach to faculty unionism” that is “characterized by a narrow focus on members’ economic interests” and focus instead on changing the workplace itself, as well as on breaking down the wall between “union issues” and “academic issues.” Ross and Savage also call for further cooperation between groups that share faculty association interests. Academic Matters

iPamba's insight:

It would be faulty to assume that faculty and unions are driven by narrow economic interests. Faculty and their unions have consistently advocated prioritizing education values and principles, argued that the working environment of education institutions are students' learning environment, and resisted the bottom-line driven top-down business model of schools and universities. Like elsewhere in the public sectors, the "business is best" approach marginalizes stakeholders, and polarizes collectives and advocates, while prioritizing branding and marketing campaigns to recreate the education landscape, create new mindsets, and focus the conversations toward criticism of faculty and their unions. It is certainly true that teaching professionals must continually engage in new and varied ways to maintain our roles as educators and reclaim our space as effective advocates.

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How I defend the rule of law using the law for its intended purpose, to protect - TEDGlobal 2014

How I defend the rule of law using the law for its intended purpose, to protect - TEDGlobal 2014 | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Every human deserves protection under their country’s laws — even when that law is forgotten or ignored. Sharing three cases from her international legal practice, Kimberley Motley, an American litigator practicing in Afghanistan and elsewhere, shows how a country’s own laws can bring both justice and “justness”: using the law for its intended purpose, to protect.
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