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Faculty, the Secret Weapon for Student Retention

Faculty, the Secret Weapon for Student Retention | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

How one college is using teamwork on campus to move the needle on student retention and completion.

 

Academica Top Ten 16 June 2016 summary of article:
US college mobilizes faculty as "secret weapon" in student retention

North Carolina Southwest Community College has mobilized its faculty to help improve its student retention rate. The college brought passionate professors on board with what it calls "Retention Action Committees," small task forces created to help generate specific goals to help retain students. The groups developed initiatives including a revival of a mandatory first-year student success course and a retention alert process that notifies faculty when concerns arise. Faculty were enthusiastic participants and helped champion a "cultural shift" across campus. "Improving retention and completion is a responsibility that belongs to us. It's not just something that resides in student services," said NCSCC VP Instruction and Student Learning Thom Brooks. American Association of Community Colleges News

iPamba's insight:

Is the issue of retention really more a concern about student welfare, or is it more a problem for schools? Affordable tuition and education costs, empathetic and effective services for students, and relevant learning processes made possible by spending allocations that prioritize human capital as well as relevant learning technologies - all these would go a long way toward decreasing the social and economic inequalities at the bottom of retention issues. Meanwhile, everything old is new again...depending on education trends, budgets, and spending priorities. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 16, 2014 12:18 PM

Teachers who care and demonstrate caring will connect with students and student learning.

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What my religion really says about women

What my religion really says about women | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Alaa Murabit's family moved from Canada to Libya when she was 15. Before, she’d felt equal to her brothers, but in this new environment she sensed big prohibitions on what she could accomplish. As a proud Muslim woman, she wondered: was this really religious doctrine? With humor, passion and a refreshingly rebellious spirt, she shares how she discovered examples of female leaders from across the history of her faith — and how she launched a campaign to fight for women's rights using verses directly from the Koran."

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Israelis, Saudis Considering Attack on Iran in Wake of Nuke Deal

Israelis, Saudis Considering Attack on Iran in Wake of Nuke Deal | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Considering the years of propaganda surrounding Iran and its nuclear program, it should be clear that the recent US-Iran nuclear deal was nothing more than a show.
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Study says improvement needed in college recruitment of underrepresented students

Study says improvement needed in college recruitment of underrepresented students | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Three applied social psychology doctoral candidates’ study says Ontario colleges can better recruit and retain underrepresented groups

 

Summary from QAcademica Top Ten - Friday 17 July 2015

Improvement needed in ON college recruitment of underrepresented students, study says

"Three University of Windsor researchers, with funding from the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO), have completed a survey finding that Ontario colleges need to improve their methods for recruiting and retaining students from underrepresented groups. The final report, titled The Recruitment of Underrepresented Groups at Ontario Colleges: A Survey of Current Practices, recommends that colleges address this need by implementing a collaborative provincial model, improving tracking systems, developing universal definitions, and expanding successful programs."

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HSBC Bank Canada | Global survey: Canadian parents most likely to expect their children to help pay for post-secondary education

HSBC Bank Canada | Global survey: Canadian parents most likely to expect their children to help pay for post-secondary education | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary by Academica Top Ten - Thu July 16, 2015

Canadian parents most likely to expect their children to pay for university, survey says

A recent report from HSBC has found that Canadian parents are the most likely to expect their children to help pay for university tuition. According to the 2015 survey of 5,550 parents in 16 countries, more than two thirds (68%) of Canadian parents expect their child to help finance their postsecondary education, which is well above the global average of 40%. Furthermore, less than half of these parents (48%) believed that completing an undergraduate degree was necessary for their children to achieve life’s most important goals. Parental attitudes toward gender and education figured prominently in the report, with 56% of parents believing that their daughters needed an undergraduate degree compared to only 40% believing the same for their sons.

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'A national hero': psychologist who warned of torture collusion gets her due

'A national hero': psychologist who warned of torture collusion gets her due | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Jean Maria Arrigo was largely ignored and the subject of a smear campaign for sounding alarms about psychologists’ post-9/11 torture complicity but has emerged from the damning report as the story’s hero – and martyr
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7th church burning in the past week - Fire at South Carolina black church followed NAACP warning

7th church burning in the past week - Fire at South Carolina black church followed NAACP warning | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A predominately black church in Greeleyville, South Carolina was in flames on Tuesday night, making it the seventh to burn in the past week.
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Solitary Confinement: 'One of the Most Barbaric, Inhumane Aspects of Our Society'

Solitary Confinement: 'One of the Most Barbaric, Inhumane Aspects of Our Society' | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Shaka Senghor, who spent 19 years in prison for second-degree murder, reflects on what he regards as the basic illogic of how U.S. prisons treat inmates.
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The Nasty Parasite That Lives in Chlorinated Swimming Pools

The Nasty Parasite That Lives in Chlorinated Swimming Pools | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
If you’re in the pool this summer when some adorable toddler has an “accidental fecal release,” you’d better hope it’s a Baby Ruth rather than soft serve. Because as disgusting as it is to be swimming with a formed stool—it’s much worse to be swimming in diarrhea. For one thing,...
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Cuba: Blazing a Trail in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS | Inter Press Service

Cuba: Blazing a Trail in the Fight Against HIV/AIDS | Inter Press Service | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Providing pregnant mothers with antiretroviral medicines can reduce the risk of HIV transmission from 45 percent to just one percent, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). Credit: Jeffrey Moyo/IPS

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Federal Judge: My Drug War Sentences Were ‘Unfair and Disproportionate’

Federal Judge: My Drug War Sentences Were ‘Unfair and Disproportionate’ | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Nancy Gertner, who left the bench after 17 years, compares the damage caused by drug prohibition to the destruction of cities in World War II.
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Can forgiveness be immoral?

Can forgiveness be immoral? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"A major, intense discussion has erupted over the issue of forgiveness in light of the killings at the AME Emanuel Church in Charleston, USA, and the dramatic forgiveness by family members of the victims."

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College is not a commodity. Stop treating it like one.

College is not a commodity. Stop treating it like one. | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
What truly makes an education valuable: the effort the student puts into it.

By Hunter Rawlings June 9

Hunter Rawlings is president of the Association of American Universities and a former president of Cornell University and the University of Iowa.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - 24 June 2015

College is not a commodity, writes AAU president

Hunter Rawlings, President of the Association of American Universities (AAU), writes in The Washington Post that it makes little sense to speak of PSE as a typical commodity. Rawlings argues that its value is determined instead by the efforts of individual students, meaning “the courses the student decides to take (and not take), the amount of work the student does, the intellectual curiosity the student exhibits, her participation in class, [and] his focus and determination.” For Rawlings, the biggest threat is the notion that education can simply be purchased, making students more likely to become upset when faced with difficult tasks or challenging ways of thinking.

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Millennials not as selfish as some people think - CBC News reports on new study

Millennials not as selfish as some people think - CBC News reports on new study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Some have said the millennial generation want it all without having to work for it. But that perception is at odds with the latest research.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - 23 June 2015

Millennials not as entitled as some may think, UBC study finds

A recent study from UBC finds that millennials (people born between the early 1980s and 2000s) might not warrant the “entitlement generation” label that many have applied to them. The study found that governments currently spend three times as much on a retiree as they do on someone under 45. Paul Kershaw of the School of Population and Public Health at UBC said of this discrepancy, “I think that’s one of the places where actually we need younger Canadians to feel more entitled. More entitled to have a world of politics that works for them simultaneously while it works for others, including the people that they love, like their parents and grandparents.” Kershaw also noted that according to existing polls, millennials value money and wealth much less than those over 45, citing fulfillment and making a difference as their highest priorities.

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3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching

3 Ways of Getting Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Vicki Davis asks her students for professional development help, ending the year with in-class focus groups, a survey, and a call for anonymous notes that will guide her in improving her practice next year.
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Is the climate crisis creating a global consciousness shift?

Is the climate crisis creating a global consciousness shift? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
When an assassin killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria in 1914, no one called it the start of the First World War. That happened years later, after the implications, consequences...
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Essay rekindles debate about racism in graduate programs | InsideHigherEd

Essay rekindles debate about racism in graduate programs | InsideHigherEd | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
July 14, 2015
By
Scott Jaschik
An essay -- "Why I No Longer Eat Watermelon, or How a Racist Email Caused Me to Leave Graduate School" -- starts by describing that incident, from 2011. The piece is spreading rapidly among graduate students, especially those who are not white, and many are saying that it provides an important perspective on their isolation and the kinds of experiences that encourage so many to leave graduate school. The blame in the essay (for which the author changed names of individuals) isn't just about the doctoral student whose actions set off a series of events, but about how a department reacted (and didn't) to what had happened.
The story starts in a “Postbellum/Pre-Harlem” literature class at Rutgers University that Robert Palmer took just after he started the English Ph.D. program. In one class session, the professor showed selected scenes from Song of the South, the 1946 Disney film that was praised for its animation and criticized by many for portraying slavery and the postslavery period in romanticized ways. A student in the class wanted to gather others to watch the film in its entirety, and she invited all of the white students in a course that was, for the program, diverse. (The author of the essay, who is not always perceived as black, was invited.)
The invitation said in part: "There seems to be an understandable demand for some hardcore Song of the Southing and preferably whiskey-based cocktails to accompany. My house is small, but my sound system is mighty …. I might yell racist things at the TV. RSVP ASAP YA’LL. If you do come, hooch is most welcome, as are straw hats and other Darkeyisms. I might even buy a watermillyum if I get enough interest."
The party didn't take place, but the student wasn't challenged about this and follow-up emails that seemed to revel in the idea of an all-white gathering to view a film that many find racist.
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Scholar who has made name as Cherokee is accused of not having Native American roots | InsideHigherEd

Scholar who has made name as Cherokee is accused of not having Native American roots | InsideHigherEd | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

July 6, 2015

ByScott Jaschik 

"When the scandal broke last month over Rachel Dolezal, the Spokane, Wash., NAACP leader and adjunct instructor of Africana studies at Eastern Washington University who apparently faked being African-American, there was widespread discussion in academe. But Dolezal was not a major player in African-American studies.

The focus on Dolezal has renewed scrutiny of Andrea Smith, associate professor of media and cultural studies at the University of California at Riverside, who is being accused of faking a Cherokee heritage that many say she lacks. Smith, unlike Dolezal, is a prominent scholar. Her books are considered significant in Native American studies, and her writing and public appearances have routinely included references to her having Cherokee roots."

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Wrongly imprisoned brothers sue detectives and city of Cleveland

Wrongly imprisoned brothers sue detectives and city of Cleveland | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Wiley Bridgeman and Kwame Ajamu were among three men convicted on the testimony of a 12-year-old witness who was threatened by police, lawsuit alleges
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Black Churches Are Burning Again in America

Black Churches Are Burning Again in America | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Arson at religious institutions has decreased significantly over the past two decades, but the symbolism remains haunting.
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Education may not reduce inequality: Editorial | Toronto Star

Education may not reduce inequality: Editorial | Toronto Star | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Post-secondary education won’t close the income gap according to a new economic analysis

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Tuesday 30 June 2015

Education may actually increase income inequality, study says

“Education and training policy is not a silver bullet for solving inequality,” according to a new study of Canadian economic data. The forces behind rising income inequality in Canada, the authors argue, cannot be offset just by increasing the level of education. University benefits, for instance, skew toward middle- and upper-income households, and as such may increase inequality. Furthermore, an increased focus on college and apprenticeship programs may not help, unless low female participation rates and low completion rates are addressed. The study, to be published in Income Inequality: The Canadian Story, is based on analysis of census and labour force data from 1981 to 2013."

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Cuba first to ​eliminate mother-to-baby HIV transmission

Cuba first to ​eliminate mother-to-baby HIV transmission | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
World Health Organisation hails ‘one of the greatest public health achievements possible’, five years into regional initiative

 

"Globally, more than 35 million adults and children are living with HIV but the infection rate has slowed significantly, with 2.1 million becoming HIV positive in 2013, down from 2.9 million in 2005, according to UNAids data.

Scientists have said eradicating Aids is feasible if HIV prevention continues to grow, even if there is no cure. The reduction in infection rates in Cuba is seen as a major breakthrough in the campaign to rid the world of the virus.

Incidence of syphilis transmission is close behind with 1 million pregnant woman worldwide infected. This can be eliminated with simple treatments such as penicillin during pregnancy.

In 2013, only two babies were born with HIV in Cuba, and only five born with congenital syphilis.

According to the WHO, the number of children born every year with HIV has almost halved since 2009, to 240,000 in 2013."

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Cuba Named 1st Country to End Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission

Cuba Named 1st Country to End Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The World Health Organization credited Cuba with offering women early access to prenatal care, HIV and syphilis testing, and treatment for mothers who test positive

 

"HAVANA, June 30 (Reuters) - The World Health Organization on Tuesday declared Cuba the first country in the world to eliminate the transmission of HIV and syphilis from mother to child.

The WHO said in a statement that an international delegation that it and the Pan American Health Organization sent to Cuba in March determined the country met the criteria for the designation. In 2013, only two children in Cuba were born with HIV and five with syphilis, the statement said.

"Cuba's success demonstrates that universal access and universal health coverage are feasible and indeed are the key to success, even against challenges as daunting as HIV," PAHO Director Carissa Etienne said in the statement."

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When It Comes to Getting a Job, Americans Believe Skills Trump College

When It Comes to Getting a Job, Americans Believe Skills Trump College | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
People see that social intelligence and computer knowledge as more important than a four-year degree in preparing for the workplace, according to a new poll.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - 25 June 2015

Survey finds Americans value skills over degrees

According to a recent US poll, Americans both old and young no longer believe that you need a college degree to be successful. Instead, respondents indicated that technological competence, interpersonal skills, and networking connections matter more to them than credentials. The poll divided respondents into a younger cohort that identified themselves as just getting started in career life and an older cohort that identified themselves as being established in their careers. Only 55% of the younger cohort and 53% of the older felt that a university education was “very important” to a good career.

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The Web Will Either Kill Science Journals or Save Them | WIRED

The Web Will Either Kill Science Journals or Save Them | WIRED | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
More than 50 percent of academic papers published are owned by five major publishers.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - 23 June 2015

Will the web save or kill academic journals?

In an interview with Wired Magazine, Vincent Larivière, of the University of Montreal’s School of Library and Information Science, has expanded on the results of his study on scientific publishing, released earlier this month. Remarking on the apparent paradox between the rise of the Internet and publisher consolidation, he noted that “what prevailed is indeed the commercial publishing model and not the independent publishing model.” Larivière is ultimately unsure about the future, noting the rise of several open journals such as PLOS One, while admitting that the open source model of journal publication is not for everyone.

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