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Bioethics: A Growing Educational Imperative

Bioethics: A Growing Educational Imperative | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Everyday doctors and health care workers are faced with ethical questions about patient care. They need to decide if doctors should place limits on therapies that cause pain and suffering and determine what to do when patients cannot make decisions for themselves and family members refuse to intervene.

Francis Barchi, an assistant professor in the School of Social Work and wife of Rutgers President Robert Barchi, and Eric Singer, a urologic surgeon, are leading a new initiative that is bringing Rutgers undergraduate students to the table and encouraging them to learn about how bioethics affects more than just medicine.
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Lessing donates 3 000 books to city library - The Herald

Lessing donates 3 000 books to city library - The Herald | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The Herald
Lessing donates 3 000 books to city library
The Herald
She was the only Nobel Prize winner with Zimbabwean connections and her left-wing and anti-settler sentiments saw her being banned from the then Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and South Africa.

Via Nevermore Sithole
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 27, 7:30 AM
Grass is Burning! Great Love for Libraries and Information Services. Great Author / Writer!
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The knowledge revolution - University World News

The knowledge revolution - University World News | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary from Academica Top Ten 26 August 2014

How digital streaming and licensing change the role of the librarian 

2 recently published articles consider the impact of technology on college and university libraries. In a piece for University World News, philosopher Martin Cohen argues that “real books have become relics, fit for glass cases.” For the next generation of students, Cohen says, “an amorphous mass of websites is already replacing core and set texts.” In this setting, algorithms have replaced subject matter experts. Cohen urges a healthy skepticism toward what he characterizes as “out of control” change, noting that the Internet tends toward monopoly and centralized control. An article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, meanwhile, focuses on how streaming media could affect libraries. Steve Kolowich says that the era of content licensing is turning more power over to publishers, but is increasingly becoming the norm as digital copies replace physical media. Rather than owning a physical copy of an item that can be loaned out at will, libraries buy permission to access a file for a set period of time. This can result in higher costs to libraries, as well as putting companies rather than the libraries themselves in charge of content stewardship. University World News | The Chronicle of Higher Education

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Faculty Associations in the 21st Century: Learning from the past – Shaping the future | OCUFA

Faculty Associations in the 21st Century: Learning from the past – Shaping the future | OCUFA | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary from Academica Top Ten 26 August 2014

OCUFA celebrates 50th anniversary with Faculty Associations in the 21st Century conference

The Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations (OCUFA) will mark its 50th anniversary with a conference exploring the theme “Faculty Associations in the 21st Century: Learning from the Past, Shaping the Future.” Participants will consider issues including international developments in faculty activism, expanding engagement with local communities and the public, creating inclusive organizations, and how faculty associations should respond to the changing academic labour market. Speakers include experts in labour law and the labour movement; higher education; and faculty organizing. The conference will take place in Toronto on October 24, 2014. Early registration ends September 1, 2014.  Conference Website

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Students like diploma-degree option at Guelph-Humber

Students like diploma-degree option at Guelph-Humber | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
As student confirmations drop overall at Ontario universities, the hybrid diploma-degree offered at Guelph-Humber added 182 students—a 19% increase.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten 25 August 2014

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Rethinking Tolerance: Ensuring That All Students Belong

Rethinking Tolerance: Ensuring That All Students Belong | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The key to creating a culture of acceptance begins with helping students articulate how they see themselves and the labels they give each other.
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Washington Post editorials will no longer use ‘Redskins’ for the local NFL team

Washington Post editorials will no longer use ‘Redskins’ for the local NFL team | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"THIS PAGE has for many years urged the local football team to change its name. The term “Redskins,” we wrote in 1992, “is really pretty offensive.” The team owner then, Jack Kent Cooke, disagreed, and the owner now,Daniel M. Snyder, disagrees, too. But the matter seems clearer to us now than ever, and while we wait for the National Football League to catch up with thoughtful opinion and common decency, we have decided that, except when it is essential for clarity or effect, we will no longer use the slur ourselves. That’s the standard we apply to all offensive vocabulary, and the team name unquestionably offends not only many Native Americans but many other Americans, too.

"We were impressed this week by the quiet integrity of Mike Carey, who recently retired after 19 seasons as one of the NFL’s most respected referees. As recounted by Post columnist Mike Wise, Mr. Carey asked the league not to assign him to officiate any Washington games and, since 2006, the league granted his request. He never made any announcement about it. “It just became clear to me that to be in the middle of the field, where something disrespectful is happening, was probably not the best thing for me,” Mr. Carey said.

"We don’t believe that fans who are attached to the name have racist feeling or intent, any more than does Mr. Snyder. But the fact remains: The word is insulting. You would not dream of calling anyone a “redskin” to his or her face. You wouldn’t let your son or daughter use it about a person, even within the privacy of your home. As Post columnist Charles Krauthammerwrote on the opposite page last year, “I wouldn’t want to use a word that defines a people — living or dead, offended or not — in a most demeaning way.”

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Growing Closer To Your Most Challenging Students

Growing Closer To Your Most Challenging Students | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Growing Closer To Your Most Challenging Students
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 22, 3:21 PM

Pillar #1 is relationships. This means knowing the stories students bring to school, not as excuses, but as part of knowing who that person is. Several years ago, a School manager explained that one "problem student" respected me and he listened to. The conversation stopped there. Instead of wanting to know what that meant, no one, including the School manager, was interested in how to build a respectful relationship with that student. It was like it was too much work.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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We can no longer assume that a story is true because it appears in the paper

We can no longer assume that a story is true because it appears in the paper | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
John Quiggin: We are now in an age of transition. 20th century assumptions about mass media, and particularly the Press are breaking down, but nothing has emerged to replace them
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 22, 3:23 PM

We should never have and this is now the case for all news media sources. Kierkegaard suggested media distorted the story and it did not serve the public sphere well. It was controlled by the few and the many did not think about what was reported.

 

School is like that unless we have teachers who genuinely act as critical theorists opening up space for students to explore.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Robo-readers aren’t as good as human readers — they’re better - The Hechinger Report

Robo-readers aren’t as good as human readers — they’re better - The Hechinger Report | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"In April of 2012, Mark D. Shermis, then the dean of the College of Education at the University of Akron, made a striking claim: “Automated essay scoring engines” were capable of evaluating student writing just as well as human readers. Shermis’s research, presented at a meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education, created a sensation in the world of education —among those who see such “robo-graders” as the future of assessment, and those who believe robo-graders are worse than useless.

...

But there’s another use for robo-graders — a role for them to play in which, evidence suggests, they may not only be as good as humans, but better. In this role, the computer functions not as a grader but as a proofreader and basic writing tutor, providing feedback on drafts, which students then use to revise their papers before handing them in to a human."

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten 21 August 2014

Automated grading programs effective as proofreaders

Several recent studies have found that automated essay grading programs, or robo-graders, can be extremely effective as proofreaders and writing tutors. These programs are designed to grade essays and exams, but have been criticized as beingunable to discern meaning and as being capable of being manipulated. But, when used as a proofreader that provides feedback on written material, robo-readers are having positive effects on students’ writing and rates of revision. In one study, when students were required to submit their work to the robo-grader first, they were more willing to go back and revise papers based on feedback from the robo-grader than they were when offered feedback from a professor. Researchers suggest that the individualized and impersonal nature of the feedback contributes to the students’ reactions. “It’s the very non-humanness of a computer that may encourage students to experiment, to explore, to share a messy rough draft without self-consciousness or embarrassment. In return, they get feedback that is individualized, but not personal — not 'punitive,'" reads a summary. Hechinger Report

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My plea to the people of Israel: Liberate yourselves by liberating Palestine - Opinion

My plea to the people of Israel: Liberate yourselves by liberating Palestine - Opinion | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, in an exclusive article for Haaretz, calls for a global boycott of Israel and urges Israelis and Palestinians to look beyond their leaders for a sustainable solution to the crisis in the Holy Land.
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Will the humanities survive the arrival of the MOOCs?

Will the humanities survive the arrival of the MOOCs? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
To get some perspective on the magnitude of the pedagogical shift, let’s go back some 2,400 years to Athens

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten 20 August 2014

Humanities scholars must find middle ground with MOOCs: BrockU professor

A Brock University Professor Emeritus considers the impact of massive open online courses (MOOCs) on humanities education in an op-ed published in the Globe and Mail. John Sainsbury says that if the humanities are to weather the proliferation of MOOCs in PSE, discipline and smart thinking will be required. “Those teaching in the humanities must negotiate a steady course between the bafflegab of the technophiles and the blinkered defeatism of the technophobes,” Sainsbury writes. He notes that technology has the ability to provide “a window to a cornucopia of riches,” such as the British Library’s illuminated manuscript collection. However, he adds that an Internet chatroom is a poor substitute for face-to-face dialogue. Sainsbury advises humanities scholars to strive for better understanding of the limitations and benefits of MOOCs in order to better advocate for a middle way, such as the inclusion of a monthly, face-to-face seminar in an otherwise digital course. Globe and Mail

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Canada Revenue Agency delists foreign charities

Canada Revenue Agency delists foreign charities | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Groups must register with agency and be involved in disaster relief, humanitarian aid or ‘activities in the national interest of Canada’
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The Millennials Are Generation Nice

The Millennials Are Generation Nice | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The millennials are emerging as a dominant demographic force. What does that mean for the rest of us?

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten 19 August 2014

Millennials value empathy and good citizenship, not self-interest

A report in the New York Times outlines findings from various sources about the habits and attitudes of millennials. According to the article, millennials, whose perspective is framed by the 2008 economic crash, are less interested in high salaries than they are in interesting, fulfilling work. Further, millennials are generally willing to embrace risk, pursuing their own ventures rather than seeking the security of a corporate job. They are less likely to be interested in prestige brands than they are the corporate social responsibility efforts of a company, and embrace “the values of good citizenship.” The article refutes the stereotype of millennials as being narcissistic, suggesting that instead their highest values are empathy and open-mindedness. They tend to be optimistic, but nevertheless are conscious that failure is a very real possibility. “I know that as hard as I work—and I work very hard—I very well may fail. And it’s liberating to know that,” said one individual interviewed for the piece.  New York Times

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How Streaming Media Could Threaten the Mission of Libraries – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

How Streaming Media Could Threaten the Mission of Libraries – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary from Academica Top Ten 26 August 2014

How digital streaming and licensing change the role of the librarian  

2 recently published articles consider the impact of technology on college and university libraries. In a piece for University World News, philosopher Martin Cohen argues that “real books have become relics, fit for glass cases.” For the next generation of students, Cohen says, “an amorphous mass of websites is already replacing core and set texts.” In this setting, algorithms have replaced subject matter experts. Cohen urges a healthy skepticism toward what he characterizes as “out of control” change, noting that the Internet tends toward monopoly and centralized control. An article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, meanwhile, focuses on how streaming media could affect libraries. Steve Kolowich says that the era of content licensing is turning more power over to publishers, but is increasingly becoming the norm as digital copies replace physical media. Rather than owning a physical copy of an item that can be loaned out at will, libraries buy permission to access a file for a set period of time. This can result in higher costs to libraries, as well as putting companies rather than the libraries themselves in charge of content stewardship. University World News | The Chronicle of Higher Education

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GeorgeBrownSMA.pdf

Summary from Academica Top Ten 26 August 2014

SMA highlights George Brown's support for lifelong learning, responsiveness to market needs
George Brown College’s responsiveness to emerging needs in the economy, its partnerships in the community, and its support for lifelong learners are identified in the strategic mandate agreement (SMA) between the college and the province as the institution’s primary areas of differentiation. The SMA points out several areas of institutional strength, including the college’s support for applied research through the Green Building Centre and the Food Innovation and Research Studio, its work with organizations such as the Toronto Construction Association and Cisco, and its flexible learning models and experiential and work-integrated learning options. The SMA also notes George Brown’s focus on access and success for underrepresented groups including Aboriginal students, first-generation students, immigrants, and persons with mental illness and/or addictions. George Brown is also recognized as a leader in college-to-college business articulations and for its global partnerships. The SMA names 5 areas of proposed program growth: hospitality management, art and design, construction, community health, and business management. George Brown SMA
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Howard Rheingold: Teaching Critical Thinking in Age of Digital Credulity

Howard Rheingold: Teaching Critical Thinking in Age of Digital Credulity | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

By HOWARD RHEINGOLD August 21, 2014 - 8:12am 

 

"I’ve been writing about digital media for nearly 30 years, and over that time, I’ve been asked over and over again by readers, critics, scholars and myself: “Do these personal computers, digital networks, webs of unfiltered information, mobile attention magnets do us more good than harm — as individuals, families, communities, and societies?” I have come to believe that the answer is: “It depends on how many people know how to use these technologies to their own benefit and that of the commons.”


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 26, 6:37 AM

Sparking thought!

Steve Vaitl's curator insight, August 26, 6:41 AM

Excellent resource for EVERYONE online!! In today's age of information, it is no longer an issue of recalling information. "Just Google it" is much more than simply a catchy phrase. Nearly every bit of information can be obtained in seconds, somewhere online. The issue has become finding the proverbial "needle in the haystack".

It has become mush more important to understand how to filter the good from the bad and the ugly.

Character Minutes's curator insight, August 27, 7:41 AM

Crap detection resources could be most helpful.

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University of Saskatchewan presidential veto power revoked

University of Saskatchewan presidential veto power revoked | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A tentative deal between the University of Saskatchewan and its faculty will remove the administration’s controversial power to veto tenure appointments.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten 25 August 2014

uSask President will no longer have tenure veto power

The President of the University of Saskatchewan will no longer have the power to veto tenure decisions. The change was stipulated in a new 3-year collective bargaining agreement tentatively agreed to by the university and the uSask Faculty Association. “I am pleased we have reached this agreement,” said Ernie Barber, uSask’s Interim Provost. “Tenure is a significant career milestone for academics and one of the most important decisions that a university makes. I believe the proposed changes are respectful of our collegial processes and will bring resolution to this important issue that has been widely debated in recent months.” In July, the StarPhoenix reported that uSask was considering appealing an earlier arbitrator’s recommendation that the President not have veto power over tenure decisions, though uSask said at that point that it was still engaged in an internal review of the policy. StarPhoenix

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How the Humanities Strengthen Science

How the Humanities Strengthen Science | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
This article originally appeared in Inside Higher Ed. “Would you like to see the brain collection?” my guide asked, as we finished our tour of the Yale School of Medicine. What scientist could resist? I was expecting an impersonal chamber crammed with specimens and devices. Perhaps a brightly lit, crowded,...
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The Question in St. Louis County: Can Whites Empathize With Blacks?

The Question in St. Louis County: Can Whites Empathize With Blacks? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
As the Brown grand jury hears evidence, are its white and black members even hearing the same thing? Many studies suggest: probably not.

 

Empathy isn’t about your own experience, but honoring and valuing someone else’s experience, especially when it’s different from your own. But studies show white people simply have less empathy for black people. For instance, in one study, white subjects were shown videos of people being stuck with a needle. The subjects’ brains and body chemistry were monitored for what researchers have identified as the tell-tale signs of empathy.

 

And when the white subjects watched white people being stuck with a needle, they responded with more empathy than when they saw black people being hurt. Another study corroborated this — asked how much something would hurt someone else (for instance, stubbing a toe), subjects consistently responded that hypothetical black people would feel less pain than hypothetical whites....

 

Sally Kohn


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Promiscuous media: News needs to go where the people are, not the other way around

Promiscuous media: News needs to go where the people are, not the other way around | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Media companies like BuzzFeed, NowThis News and Fusion are increasingly creating content that is designed to live on other apps and services rather than just including links to their websites. This promiscuous approach to media is a smart strategy in an increasingly crowded environment
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A War on Gaza’s Future? Israeli Assault Leaves 500 Kids Dead, 3,000 Injured, 373,000 Traumatized

A War on Gaza’s Future? Israeli Assault Leaves 500 Kids Dead, 3,000 Injured, 373,000 Traumatized | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
As the Israeli offensive in Gaza resumes, we look at the impact the military campaign has had on the children of Gaza. More than 467 Palestinian children have died since July. That is more than the combined number of child fatalities in the two previous conflicts in Gaza. According to the World Health Organization, more than 3,000 children have been injured, of which an estimated 1,000 will suffer from a lifelong disability. The United Nations estimates at least 373,000 children require direct and specialized psychosocial support. And, based on the total number of adults killed, there may be up to 1,500 children orphaned. Gazan children’s right to an education has also been severely compromised with at least 25 schools reportedly damaged so severely that they can no longer be used. We speak to Pernille Ironside, chief of UNICEF’s Gaza field office.

"There isn’t a single family in Gaza who hasn’t experienced personally death, injury, the loss of their home, extensive damage, displacement," Ironside says. "The psychological toll that has on a people, it just cannot be overestimated, and especially on children."
iPamba's insight:

Desmond Tutu: 

"I have condemned those in Palestine responsible for firing missiles and rockets at Israel. They are fanning the flames of hatred. I am opposed to all manifestations of violence.

"But we must be very clear that the people of Palestine have every right to struggle for their dignity and freedom. It is a struggle that has the support of many around the world."

Occupations, sieges and blockades are insufferable assaults on the inalienable rights of humans and an insufferable status quo for any human population.

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Americans' Deep Racial Divide on Trusting the Police

Americans' Deep Racial Divide on Trusting the Police | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
It isn't just Ferguson—polling shows that black Americans are wary of law enforcement across the nation, while whites are more likely to trust officers.

 

"As journalists and politicians grapple with ways to restore confidence in Ferguson's local police, it's worth noting that these tensions between police and citizens aren't confined to a small community in Missouri."

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The 9 Principles of Good Policing

The 9 Principles of Good Policing | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The foundations of a civilized law-enforcement agency—and a veteran LAPD officer whose attitudes are at odds with them
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Former post-secondary students give their education an A+ | BC Newsroom

Former post-secondary students give their education an A+ | BC Newsroom | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
As more than 430,000 post-secondary students in B.C. are getting ready to hit the books, a new survey shows that an education in B.C. is a blueprint for workplace success.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten 20 August 2014

BC graduates report satisfaction with education

British Columbia has released the results from its annual student outcomes surveys, reporting a graduate satisfaction rate of 93%. The surveys poll graduates from a wide range of academic, technical, and developmental programs, 2 years after graduation. 91% of respondents that graduated from diploma, associate degree or certificate programs were in the workforce, 88% of baccalaureate graduates were in the workforce, and 96% of former apprentice students were employed at the time of the survey. “Students who have a good experience with post-secondary education are more likely to find good jobs and be successful in their work and personal lives,” said Advanced Education Minister Amrik Virk. The surveys collect information on employment, student loan/debt information, and student satisfaction with the education they received. BC News Release | The Province | Survey Factsheet

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When Fleeing War Becomes Illegal

When Fleeing War Becomes Illegal | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Palestinians escaping Syria are being turned away by neighboring states.

...

"Amid the millions of refugees from Syria flooding into neighboring countries like Lebanon and Jordan, a minority group is being quietly denied entry, detained, deported, and pushed out in any way possible: Palestinians. They are refugees who literally have nowhere to go."

...

"In Jordan, Prime Minister Abdullah Ensour said that Palestinians fleeing Syria should be allowed to return to their places of origin in Israel and Palestine. “Jordan is not a place to solve Israel’s problems,” Ensour said in an interview with Al-Hayat, adding that receiving those refugees would lead to another wave of displacement. “Our Palestinian brothers in Syria have the right to go back to their country of origin. They should stay in Syria until the end of the crisis.” "

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