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8 Ways Tech Has Completely Rewired Our Brains

8 Ways Tech Has Completely Rewired Our Brains | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Thanks to technology, our brains are being rewired -- for better or worse.
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critical reasoning
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Critical Pedagogy: How to respond to ‘future-focused’ discourse

Critical Pedagogy: How to respond to ‘future-focused’ discourse | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"“So it was an instrument of radical change, that’s what they thought it was. And then around about the middle of the 1980s …this computer got into the hands of school administrations and the ministries and the commissioners of education, state education departments. And now look what they did with them … The establishment pulls together and now they’ve got … a computer curriculum, and there’s a special computer teacher. In other words, the computer has been thoroughly assimilated to the way you do things in school.” — Papert, in Papert & Freire, late 1980s via Milne (2013)."


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Lessons From a 19th Century Whaleship

Lessons From a 19th Century Whaleship | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Disproportionate misery for black Americans veiled by political illusions of racial equality and benevolence? For all the hand-wringing about rising WWC mortality, black, Latino and Native American death, disease, joblessness and poverty rates remain considerably higher than those of U.S. whites. This gap reflects racial disparities that are deeply embedded across the nation’s core social structures and leading institutions. Blacks and Latinos provide the critical raw material for the history’s greatest mass incarceration system (the U.S. is home to 4.4 percent of the world’s population but 22 percent of its prisoners). The nation’s giant U.S. prison-industrial complex’s captives are more than two-thirds nonwhite.

The special oppression experienced by the nonwhite working and lower classes elicits remarkably little interest and attention in a white-majority political culture that is understandably shocked to hear that members of the WWC are dying younger than before.

The WWC is routinely and absurdly blamed for the right-wing and racist Donald Trump presidency. In fact, however, Trump’s backers have tended to be relatively well-off and not particularly working class. The racist, white-identitarian Trump coalition is a cross-class Caucasian phenomenon tilted more to the top than the bottom of the white class structure. The WWC didn’t elect Trump any more than all the white sailors on the Essex chose to head to Chile instead of Tahiti. That fateful decision was made exclusively by the ship’s white captain and his two best-paid white overseers. The 11 white crew members without officer status had nothing to say about it.

And why is the American working class so commonly seen as “white” these days? Seven of the Essex’s 21 crew members were black. In a similar vein, people of color make up a third of the U.S. workforce today. There is a “white working class” just as there is a “black working class” or a “Latino working class,” but the working class itself is multiracial and considerably less white than commonly advertised in the Age of Trump.

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Homeopathy Embarrassing to Integrative Medicine

Homeopathy Embarrassing to Integrative Medicine | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Homeopathy is the most embarrassing form of alternative medicine, and the easiest to refute. There has been long series of skeptical wins around the world over the past year – including Univ…
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Ending Poverty in Next 13 years Means Boosting Resilience Now | Inter Press Service

Ending Poverty in Next 13 years Means Boosting Resilience Now | Inter Press Service | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Dominica, 2 October Devastation after Hurricane Maria. Credit: Ian King/UNDP

UNITED NATIONS, Oct 17 2017 (IPS) - This month the world marks two key International Days: for the Eradication of Poverty on 17 October and for Disaster Reduction, four days earlier. It is no coincidence that they are profoundly connected.

Reducing risks related to disasters has never been so urgent—and the Latin America and the Caribbean region bears witness to this. Seven hurricanes have hit the Caribbean in the past five months, two of them as category 5, causing catastrophic damage, including in island nations that were barely recovering from another massive hurricane that struck one year ago.

Also, two earthquakes rocked Mexico in September—with almost 5.000 aftershocks—while another powerful quake struck Ecuador in April 2016. In addition, both Colombia and Peru suffered major landslides in the past eight months.

The number of children, women and men killed is deeply saddening, especially in an era in which we have the knowledge to minimize loss of lives due to natural events. Yet, we keep experiencing tragedies.

The fact is that natural disasters do not exist. Such phenomena become disasters when people, communities and societies are vulnerable to them. This, in turn, translates into losses—of lives and assets. And the poorest are the hardest hit.

On the one hand, poverty reduces people’s capacity to face and recover from disasters; on the other hand, disasters also hinder people’s ability to leave poverty behind.

That’s why if the world is to end poverty in all its forms by 2030 we must also boost resilience—in all its forms. This means the capacity to cope with shocks without major economic, social and environmental setbacks.
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Living Mulch Builds Profits, Soil

Living Mulch Builds Profits, Soil | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Living mulch functions like mulch on any farm or garden except — it’s alive. No, it’s not out of the latest horror movie; living mulch is a system farmers can use to benefit both profits and the soil. While the system has been around for a while, scientists at the University of Georgia are making it more efficient and sustainable.
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Meet the new class traitors who are coming out as rich

Meet the new class traitors who are coming out as rich | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
For many, talking about money, especially their own, is a social taboo. But now wealthy progressives are opening up about a system that is skewed in their favor
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The true cost of a plate of food: $1 in New York, $320 in South Sudan

The true cost of a plate of food: $1 in New York, $320 in South Sudan | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Research reveals the stark inequality that drives the global hunger crisis, with the poorest people paying more than they earn in a day for a single meal
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College strikes a symptom of broken business model: Cohn | Toronto Star

College strikes a symptom of broken business model: Cohn | Toronto Star | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
If everyone is losing out — students, teachers, colleges, parents, politicians — why are we continuing down a dead end?
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Ontario bill seeks to ban mandatory high heels in the workplace

Ontario bill seeks to ban mandatory high heels in the workplace | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The private member’s bill from Cristina Martins would amend the Occupational Health and Safety Act to protect workers from being required to wear unsafe footwear as part of dress and uniform codes
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It looks like we're in for another La Niña winter. What does that mean?

It looks like we're in for another La Niña winter. What does that mean? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
It seems like every year there’s some talk of El Niño or La Niña, and every year you intend to figure out what that really means. This is that year.
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10 Dos and Don'ts For Group Work & Student Grouping

10 Dos and Don'ts For Group Work & Student Grouping | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
10 Dos and Don'ts For Group Work & Student Grouping
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Why adjuncts should quit complaining and just quit (essay)

Why adjuncts should quit complaining and just quit (essay) | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"The radical move might be to quit, writes Claire B. Potter."


Summary from Academica Group - Tuesday 17 October 2017


"Driving real change might require adjuncts to quit: Potter 


Quitting might be the most radical and effective course of action that adjuncts can take if they want to disrupt the exploitation of part-time academic labour, writes Claire Potter. 


The author notes that “[a]side from the stress of trying to piece together a career one course at a time, the adjunct army -- permanently contingent, underemployed, overworked and underpaid faculty members -- has every reason to demand radical change.” 


However, Potter suggests that this demand for change usually takes the form of “radical utterances that get contingent faculty into trouble and leave a system that relies on a reserve army of labor unchanged.” 


Quitting academia, Potter argues, would leave universities with a shrinking group of part-time instructors and would force real change in higher ed hiring practices."

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How Toronto is Facing the Opioid Crisis - TVO

How Toronto is Facing the Opioid Crisis - TVO | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Air Date: Oct 13, 2017
Length: 14:47

About this Video
Like many cities across Ontario, Toronto is searching for more methods and money to stem the rising number of deaths from opioids. Joe Cressy, city councillor for Ward 20 and chair of the city's Drug Strategy Implementation Panel, joins The Agenda to discuss why he believes the opioid crisis should be declared a public health emergency. TVO

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The best way to teach: Teacher-directed vs. Student-led. Results will surprise you.

The best way to teach: Teacher-directed vs. Student-led. Results will surprise you. | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"There is a long-standing, red-hot debate in educational circles about the most effective way to teach kids. 


Some favor more traditional teacher-directed methods, with the teacher presenting materials and responding to questions about it. Others advocate for inquiry-based learning—where students drive their own learning through discovery and exploration, working with peers and developing their own ideas—arguing it results in deeper, and more meaningful learning. 


The two are sometimes pitted against each other as “sage on a stage” (teacher directed) vs. “guide on the side” (student-led, or inquiry based). Both cite ample evidence to prove the superiority of their method (see here for teacher-directed, and here for inquiry-based). 


McKinsey applied machine learning to the world’s largest student database to try and come up with a more scientific answer. 


The bottom line: A mixture of the two methods is best, but between the two, teacher-directed came out stronger. 


In all five regions of the world, scores were generally higher when teachers took the lead. “The more frequently teacher-directed happens, the better students do,” said Marc Krawitz, an associate partner at McKinsey. Conversely, “Student outcomes tend to decline with inquiry-based, as it is increased in isolation.”"


Via Mel Riddile, Nevermore Sithole
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 19, 3:08 AM
The best way to teach: Teacher-directed vs. Student-led. Results will surprise you.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 19, 5:08 PM
John Dewey argued that traditional/progressive and child-centred/teacher-centered are false dichotomies. The research here points to something like that as well. Teachers teach and are responsible for that element. Students have to grow and become responsible for their learning.
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A New World Order in the Making TVO

A New World Order in the Making TVO | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Air Date: Oct 17, 2017
Length: 25:00

About this Video
The idea that might does not make right is relatively new in the annals of human history. And the aspiration that universal human rights overrule such violence and protect the rights of weak and strong alike is an ongoing struggle. The Agenda welcomes human rights lawyer Payam Akhavan, who, as this year's CBC Massey lecturer, delivered a talk titled, "In Search of a Better World; A Human Rights Odyssey." TVO

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Peace and stability must be restored in the Middle East and North Africa so as to alleviate poverty | Inter Press Service

Peace and stability must be restored in the Middle East and North Africa so as to alleviate poverty | Inter Press Service | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"GENEVA, Oct 17 2017 (IPS) - On the occasion of the 2017 International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, the Chairman of the Geneva Centre for Human Rights Advancement and Global Dialogue H. E. Dr. Hanif Hassan Ali Al Qassim observed that the unprecedented rise of violence and insecurity in the Arab region combined, breed poverty and societal decline.

He noted that the Middle East and the North Africa region was once at the forefront of progress to alleviate poverty and hunger – in line with the provisions set forth in Millennium Development Goal 1 – but noted, however, that a multitude of factors have contributed to a reversal of progress undermining the alleviation of poverty as stipulated in Sustainable Development Goal 1 to end poverty in all its forms everywhere by 2030.

 
In this context, he stated that “the spread of conflict and violence have left a social and political vacuum that has been filled by violent and extremist groups. The persistence of political and social unrest in the Arab region have become the main drivers of poverty. Approximately 2/3 of the population in Syria are now living below the poverty line. In Yemen, more than 50% of the population live in extreme poverty, whereas this malaise now affects around 1/3 of Libya’s population. Insecurity driven poverty and fragile societies – gripped by violence and conflict – have thrown Arab countries into chronic poverty and societal decline.”"

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Hopes fade in desperate search for missing after bombing in Somalia

Hopes fade in desperate search for missing after bombing in Somalia | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Saturday’s blast killed more than 300 people in one of the world’s deadliest attacks in years
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Myanmar army killed hundreds in campaign to expel Rohingya Muslims: Amnesty

Myanmar army killed hundreds in campaign to expel Rohingya Muslims: Amnesty | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
More than 580,000 refugees have arrived in Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when Myanmar security forces began a scorched-earth campaign against Rohingya villages
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Reckon you were born without a brain for maths? Highly unlikely

Reckon you were born without a brain for maths? Highly unlikely | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Maths is not about learning times tables, it’s about spotting patterns in everything we experience and using them to plan and invent
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Telling Adjuncts to Quit Is Giving Up on Education | Just Visiting

Telling Adjuncts to Quit Is Giving Up on Education | Just Visiting | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Someday, the bell will toll for all faculty. There's only one way to prevent it and it doesn't involve adjuncts quitting en masse.
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Exploring the Use of E-Textbooks in Higher Education: A Multiyear Study

Exploring the Use of E-Textbooks in Higher Education: A Multiyear Study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A four-year university-wide study of students' e-textbook practices found that e-textbook use has increased, particularly among younger students. Inst
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The 'rape capital of the world'? We women in Congo don't see it that way | Justine Masika Bihamba

The 'rape capital of the world'? We women in Congo don't see it that way | Justine Masika Bihamba | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Congo is a nation of sisterhood and solidarity. We are changing our country from within, risking our lives to speak out and taking up the political fight against sexual violence – rather than just taking notes while men speak
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Why What Students Don't Know Is More Important Than What They Do

Why What Students Don't Know Is More Important Than What They Do | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
This is organic boundary can shrink in or grow outwards as they encounter new ideas & combine multiple sources of information to create new perspectives.
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Murdered Panama Papers journalist's son attacks Malta's 'crooks'

Murdered Panama Papers journalist's son attacks Malta's 'crooks' | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Daphne Caruana Galizia was killed because she ‘stood between rule of law and those who sought to violate it’, says son Matthew
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William Watson: Turns out the STEM ‘gender gap’ isn’t a gap at all - Windsor Star

William Watson: Turns out the STEM ‘gender gap’ isn’t a gap at all - Windsor Star | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

It’s not that women aren’t interested in STEM; it’s that men aren’t interested in non-STEM subjects


Summary from Academica Group - Tuesday 17 October 2017


"There is no STEM gap in ON: Watson 


“Women [in Ontario] who come out of high school with the math and science prerequisites for STEM programs are only slightly less likely than men to go into such programs,” writes William Watson. 


The author notes that while it is true that only 30.3% of women university undergraduates are enrolled in STEM programs compared to 42.5% of men, the difference is due largely to the larger overall number of women attending university. 


Citing previous research on the topic, Watson argues that women make up roughly 49% of STEM students in ON universities. 


“If there is a problem,” Watson concludes, “it’s not that women aren’t interested in STEM; it’s that men aren’t interested in poetry—or languages or philosophy or art or all the other non-STEM subjects.”

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