critical reasoning
Follow
Find
2.0K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by iPamba
onto critical reasoning
Scoop.it!

Who Takes MOOCs? Educated, Employed, First-World Guys.

Who Takes MOOCs? Educated, Employed, First-World Guys. | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
They promise equality of access to higher learning, but online courses will only succeed with better general education in place first, say two educationalists. A revolution in education has been promised with a little help from technology. Massive Open Online Courses are free, online, university-level instruction that anyone can access...
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

critical reasoning
Informed, openminded, fairminded, courageous, creative
Curated by iPamba
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Israeli soldiers cast doubt on legality of Gaza military tactics

Israeli soldiers cast doubt on legality of Gaza military tactics | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Testimonies of Israeli combatants about last year’s war show apparent disregard for safety of civilians
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

What The Bacteria In Your Gut Have To Do With Your Physical And Mental Health

What The Bacteria In Your Gut Have To Do With Your Physical And Mental Health | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Strange but true fact: Our bodies are made of more bacteria than human cells, and the gut alone contains trillions of microbes (bacteria and fungi). In fact, it's estimated that the body is composed of 10 times more bacteria than human cells.

And ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The rebellion in Baltimore is an uprising against austerity, claims top US academic

The rebellion in Baltimore is an uprising against austerity, claims top US academic | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Gentrified cities, the fall of manufacturing, the filling of jails with black men - all fuelled the violence that followed the killing of Freddie Gray

 

"For Baltimore to be the setting for the latest in a recent spate of high-profile police murders and riots in America – after Ferguson, New York and North Charleston – is especially compelling in the public imagination because the city was also the location for David Simon’s brilliant TV series The Wire.

 

"Baltimore is the city from which Simon wrote for this newspaper in 2013 about “two Americas” in the “horror show” his country has become, one crucial element of which is that the US is “the most incarcerative state in the history of mankind, in terms of the sheer numbers of people we’ve put in American prisons”.


"The Wire, he said, “was about people who were worthless and who were no longer necessary”, most of them black, and who become the assembly-line raw material for “the prison-industrial complex”. At an event hosted by the Observer that year, Simon said: “Once America marginalised the black 10% of the population it no longer needed, it set out to make money out of them by putting them in jail."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Tips and tools that identify and prevent speech, voice, and hearing impairments

"— (NEW YORK – May 1) To mark Better Hearing and Speech Month in May, Mount Sinai Health System experts are sharing tips and tools that identify and prevent speech, voice, and hearing impairments. Such impairments affect 43 million Americans.

“Signs of hearing loss include pain, ringing or buzzing in the ears during or after a noisy activity,” said Eric Smouha, MD, Associate Professor, Otolaryngology, Director of Otology and Neurotology, The Mount Sinai Hospital’s Hearing and Balance Center. “It’s important to get screened if you suspect you or your child have hearing loss. There are treatments available to prevent further or permanent hearing loss, if discovered early enough.”

“Difficulty with speech can be the result of problems with nerves that control, larynx, mouth and throat muscles that are necessary for speech,” said Michael Pitman, MD, Associate Professor, Otolaryngology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Director of Laryngology, The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary at Mount Sinai. “Abnormalities of the vocal cords such as inflammation, polyps, cysts, and tumors can affect the pitch and quality of the voice. Anyone who communicates with their voice as a significant part of their job, such as teachers, lawyers, call centers, translators, MTA announcers, etc. should be hyper vigilant.”"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Marketing Cognition Products

Marketing Cognition Products | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Cognition and brain health is a hot topic, especially in light of the aging population. The World Health Organization estimated that 36 million people were suffering from dementia-related conditions in 2012, and that number is expected to double by 2030. As there is currently no cure for dementia, consumers have a strong interest in both performance and preventive cognition products that include an array of options from foods and beverages to supplements and nutraceuticals to a range of cognitive services.        
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

CNN physician-journalist poses ethical dilemma after treating Nepal victims

CNN physician-journalist poses ethical dilemma after treating Nepal victims | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Questions raised after celebrated neurosurgeon and CNN reporter Sanjay Gupta is filmed performing surgery on quake victims

 

"Ethical questions have been raised after a CNN crew covering the Nepalese earthquake filmed its chief medical correspondent perform emergency brain surgery on an eight-year-old girl using a saw and resuscitate a woman mid-air on a helicopter, using a cardiac thump.

Dr Sanjay Gupta, the feted neurosurgeon and CNN journalist, who was reporting on the devastating 7.8 magnitude quake, has regularly stepped in to save lives while covering a story for the broadcaster.

Gupta is no stranger to carrying out medical procedures in front of the camera. Hetreated a two-year-old boy on assignment in the Middle East, and examined patients on camera after the 2010 Haiti earthquake."
 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Essay about the importance of college presidents teaching undergraduates | InsideHigherEd

Essay about the importance of college presidents teaching undergraduates | InsideHigherEd | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Because the work of presidents has grown exponentially, taken on relentless speed and become increasingly distant from the classroom, many believe that presidents no longer have any place as professors. Although I had been an award-winning, tenured full professor for many years, and more recently as a dean and provost guided doctoral research and taught a graduate seminar, I had to persuade my faculty union to approve me to teach at my current university. And, once approved, even though my only experience teaching freshmen was well before our current class of students was born, I was limited to a 100-level freshman class (designed to teach critical thinking, analysis and effective communication). No problem -- I wanted to teach a first-year seminar because I suspected I would learn a great deal from doing it, and I did.
iPamba's insight:

A requirement that education administrators have experience in teaching and learning in an education context would be a good start.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Living, and Dying, at Home - How to Avoid Nursing Homes

Living, and Dying, at Home - How to Avoid Nursing Homes | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"America's aging don't want to leave the places where they've lived for decades. What do they need to manage at home?"

 

"A few years back, a Domino’s pizza delivery worker named Susan Guy began to worry about one of her elderly customers, Jean Wilson, who had ordered a pizza a day for three years. Guy hadn't received an order from Wilson for a few days, so she went to Wilson’s house and knocked on the door. When Wilson didn’t answer, Guy checked with a neighbor and then called the police, who beat down the door and found that the elderly woman had fallen and was unable to reach the phone to call for help. The woman was rushed to the hospital, and survived the ordeal.

The story illustrates one of the biggest fears many seniors and their families face about aging alone. What if something should happen? What if no one is there to help?

To avoid ending up in situations like Wilson’s, seniors often move to assisted-living communities and to nursing homes, shepherded there by their worried children. This is a pricey proposition—assisted living costs, on average, $3,000 a month, and some Continuing Care Retirement Communities require seniors to cough up a hefty down payment, say $250,000, for their apartment (which sometimes is refunded to heirs upon the resident’s death)."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Why the Clintons Are No Longer 'Tough on Crime'

Why the Clintons Are No Longer 'Tough on Crime' | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Hillary Clinton is loudly repudiating the criminal-justice policies that she championed during her husband's administration.


"The criminal-justice policies she now denounces once helped her husband capture the White House."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

‘Sexist’ peer review causes storm online

‘Sexist’ peer review causes storm online | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Sussex researcher speaks of ‘disbelief’ at comments over paper on gender bias

Peer reviewer’s sexist comments cause online firestorm

Scientific journal PLOS ONE has come under fire for a sexist comment reportedly made by one of its anonymous peer reviewers. The paper in question, written by evolutionary geneticist Fiona Ingleby and evolutionary biologist Megan Head, explored gender differences in the transition from PhD student to postdoc. The reviewer rejected the paper, saying in part that “it would probably … be beneficial to find one or two male biologists to work with (or at least obtain internal peer review from, but better yet as active co-authors).” In a statement, PLOS responded that they regret “the tone, spirit, and content of this particular review.” ScienceInsider | Times Higher Education

iPamba's insight:

"Sussex researcher speaks of ‘disbelief’ at comments over paper on gender bias"

Disbelief? Real evaluation criteria are the ones that are rarely exposed. Occasional slips serve to remind us that institutionalized inequality keeps the old guard securely entrenched in place.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

UN accused of 'reckless disregard' for allegations of peacekeeper child abuse

UN accused of 'reckless disregard' for allegations of peacekeeper child abuse | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
US diplomat James Wasserstrom says case of Anders Kompass, who exposed allegations of sex abuse by French forces, shows UN turns on whistleblowers
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

We need racial justice and economic justice. We can’t breathe if we can’t eat | Hannah Giorgis

We need racial justice and economic justice. We can’t breathe if we can’t eat | Hannah Giorgis | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
To stifle a community slowly, you institutionalize and even criminalize poverty while withholding the resources needed to escape it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Faculty Mentoring Faculty: Relationships that Work

Faculty Mentoring Faculty: Relationships that Work | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Our habit of thinking of faculty mentoring as a senior-to-junior exchange troubles me. I think that the insights and learning can flow in both directions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The case for engineering our food

The case for engineering our food | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Jimmy Carter calls situation in Gaza 'intolerable' eight months after war

Jimmy Carter calls situation in Gaza 'intolerable' eight months after war | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Former US president, in Jerusalem with former Norwegian prime minister, says residents ‘cannot live with the respect and dignity they deserve’
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The damning new details of Freddie Gray's treatment by police

The damning new details of Freddie Gray's treatment by police | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

No cause for arrest, in shackles, no seat belt, no medical attention, ignoring pleas for help .

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Anne Hathaway’s New One-Woman Play Predicts a Frightening (and Very Possible) Future in the Drone Wars

Anne Hathaway’s New One-Woman Play Predicts a Frightening (and Very Possible) Future in the Drone Wars | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

A U.S. Predator drone passes over a forward operating base near Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2009.
Photo by Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images


"Never before have warriors been able to remove themselves entirely from the battlefield. "

 

"In an April 24 Slate column, my friend and colleague William Saletan argued, “For civilians, drones are the safest form of war in modern history … more discriminating and more accurate” than artillery shelling or conventional airstrikes. He’s right, as far as he goes. Since 2004, according to a range of estimates, by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism and the New America Foundation, U.S. drone strikes have killed between 2,227 and 3,949 people in Pakistan—between 8 and 24 percent of them civilians. Those are horrifying figures. But by comparison, two-thirds of combat deaths in World War II were civilian, three-quarters in the Korean War, and more than half (probably far more) in Vietnam. Saletan doesn’t mention this, but the Red Cross estimates that, in bombardment campaigns throughout the 20th century, 10 civilians were killed for every combatant casualty.

"However, on another level, these comparisons are misleading to the point of meaninglessness. Those 20th-century wars were all-out wars, most of them declared, none of them covert, all of them fought on territory that the residents knew were war zones. An ethical debate could still be held, decades later, on the morality (and strategic wisdom) of bombing cities and villages, even in the context of total war. But drone strikes in Pakistan or Yemen are different in kind: The United States is not at war with those countries.

"Imagine that a Canadian general or prime minister launched an airstrike on a border town in Minnesota because some avowed enemies of the Great White North had taken refuge there and that, as a result of bad aim or poor intelligence or dumb luck, a few—much less a few dozen or a few hundred—Americans were killed. The American people and the U.S. government would be outraged. If we didn’t already hate Canadians, we would start hating them then, maybe even start killing them in return.

 

"So it is with Yemen, Pakistan, and many parts of Afghanistan, where Americans continue to drop bombs from the sky."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

A Little Bit of Walking Can Add up to Improve Your Health

A Little Bit of Walking Can Add up to Improve Your Health | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Walking an extra two minutes per hour can actually make a difference, a new study suggests

 

"Want to reduce your risk of dying at a young age? Try walking casually for as little as 2 minutes per hour.

While it is well known that intense exercise can help you get fitter, a new study has found that even a little exercise can still go a long way. Study participants who traded time on the sofa for a total of 30 minutes of walking during the day reduced their risk of dying over a three-year period by 33 percent.

For the participants with chronic kidney disease, the risk of dying was reduced by more than 40 percent, according to the findings, published today (April 30) in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Freddie Gray death: murder charge announced against police officer

Freddie Gray death: murder charge announced against police officer | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
State’s attorney Marilyn Mosby announces criminal charges and says Freddie Gray’s arrest by Baltimore police was illegal: ‘No crime had been committed’
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Correcting Deepening Inequity in Our Schools - 3 Action Areas to Counter the Pedagogy of Pessimism

Correcting Deepening Inequity in Our Schools - 3 Action Areas to Counter the Pedagogy of Pessimism | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Fifty years ago, in June 1965, President Lyndon Johnson made a commencement speech to Howard University. He said, in part:

 

'You do not take a person who, for years, has been hobbled by chains and liberate him, bring him up to the starting line of a race and then say, "You are free to compete with all the others," and still justly believe that you have been completely fair.'

 

"This belief Johnson addresssed is still too prevalent. It creates victim blaming and pessimism. And it provides a reason why social-emotional and character competencies (emotional intelligence, to some) are so important in educators' work.

Though there are some deniers, inequity cannot be denied, and it is deepening. Further, inequity is insidious because it leads to a pedagogy of pessimism. Gradually, folks don't expect much from certain others and don't believe there will be follow through.

Hardworking educators are not met halfway and instead see a lack of enthusiasm and engagement. It's natural to begin to think, "Why go the extra mile for children who don't seem to want to go the extra yard -- for their own best interests or the best interests of their loved ones?"

We must counter what I call the pedagogy of pessimism with an attitude of optimism and the enhancement of human dignity. These factors matter with respect to the ultimate outcomes of what we do in each and all of our classrooms and schools.

Equity Area #1: Build Social-Emotional and Character Competencies...Equity Area #2: Treat All Others with Dignity...Equity Area #3: Political Action Is Needed

Finally, the third order of equity recognizes the need for political as well as educational solutions. A history of inequity supports the persistence of pessimism and ensures that a vicious cycle of failure will continue.

The ongoing and accelerating lack of equity experienced by many of those with whom you, and I, work requires redress in policy and regulation. We cannot accomplish this in our roles in schools, but rather in our roles outside the school, as citizens and advocates.

However, while that process moves forward, we must face the children in our schools with an attitude of optimism -- a commitment to systematically build their social-emotional and character competencies.

We must also commit to a determination to give the benefit of the doubt even when we have doubt, and relate with genuine warmth and support to all, and especially those whom we may have discounted in the past."

 

iPamba's insight:

Equity advocates working in schools where inequity is institutionalized often find themselves marginalized and isolated. How do concede that we cannot redress inequitable policies and regulations in school without participating in the "pedagogy of pessimism"?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Not in our name: World Press Freedom Day 116 days after Charlie Hebdo

Not in our name: World Press Freedom Day 116 days after Charlie Hebdo | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Full text of an open letter from media, writers and human rights associations worldwide calling for government action to protect freedom of speech

 

"On World Press Freedom Day, 116 days after the attack at the office of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo that left 11 dead and 12 wounded, we, the undersigned, reaffirm our commitment to defending the right to freedom of expression, even when that right is being used to express views that we and others may find difficult, or even offensive."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Why Educators Have to Blog - and Some "Best Practices of Education Blogging"

Why Educators Have to Blog - and Some "Best Practices of Education Blogging" | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

April 30, 2015

"Educators are quick to tell students about the benefits of blogging, but slow to embrace them personally. Part of this is simply the immense work load educators take on these days but part of it is also the rut in which many educators find themselves in regards to approaching their work – and their students. Many educators understand that blogging can help nurture relationships with fellow education professionals and reach out to students academically but too many think the benefits stop there.

Blogging – Why It Matters to Educators?
Educators have always come together to exchange ideas, learn about new approaches in education and, of course, to simply vent their frustrations.  While this has traditionally been done through user groups, informal social networks and both online and print journals, blogging has added a new element as well as new responsibilities. 

First, blogging forces educators to return to their roots by organizing their thoughts in order to write and post their opinions, observations and findings.  Returning to the basics this way helps professionals organize their thoughts more effectively and puts them in a better position to help students who struggle with some of the same issues.  An educator who blogs regularly can help students more effectively when it comes to organizing their essay structure, finding reliable resources and simply making the time to sit down and write. 

Blogging has become the best and most effective way to share and discuss new approaches in education and how to meet the challenges of the 21st Century classroom.  For some students that means finding the ways to draw their attention back to education (and away from Angry Birds) while for others it means finding ways to integrate personal electronics, social media and memes into their curriculum.

Reaching Out to Students  
Students today are much more relaxed, confident and at home when sitting behind a keyboard.  The same student who never says a word in class can prove to be the voice of a generation once they get home and are settled in behind their laptop, keyboard or tablet.  Involving students in blogging not only encourages them to open up and respond to posts, it also gives them more insight into your own methods and the  world of education in general.  

Students who have a clearer idea of why teachers do the things they do are more likely 
to have mature and motivated attitude to the education. They get the opportunity to see the things from an entirely different perspective and helps them to understand why education is important for their skills development and future opportunities. Teachers thus turn from 'enemies' and 'punishers' into mature friends, advisors, people who have experience and can be referred to with questions. 

Finally, it reinforces the idea that education isn’t just a phase in someone’s life – it’s a lifelong journey. Once they see that educators and professionals from every industry turn to blogging in order to connect with each other and encourage innovation, they’ll see the skills you’re trying so hard to teach them really do have a place outside your classroom."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Lloyd Axworthy: Everyone should have a chance to attend university

Lloyd Axworthy: Everyone should have a chance to attend university | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Universities are a fundamental building block of democracy and justice

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - 1 May 2015

Coates, Axworthy debate university enrolment

The National Post has published dueling op-eds in which Lloyd Axworthy and Ken Coates debate how many young people should be attending university. Coates revisits his argument that institutions should be more selective in admitting students, arguing that growing class sizes have led to a decline in quality. Axworthy counters that education is a "fundamental building block in the wellbeing of democracy" and that reducing enrolment as Coates suggests would contribute to inequality. Axworthy quotes Andrew Parkin's recent argument on Academica's Rethinking Higher Ed that education need not be a zero-sum game, and emphasizes the value of a liberal arts education as well as skills-based training for preparing graduates for an uncertain future. National Post (Coates) | National Post (Axworthy)

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Why are people racist? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Joseph Harker

Why are people racist? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Joseph Harker | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Every day, millions of people ask Google some of life’s most difficult questions, big and small. In a new series, our writers answer some of the most common queries – starting with the issue of racism
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by iPamba from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

Education in the Digital Age

Education in the Digital Age | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

It is time to re-examine how we deliver education over the 20-plus years students spend in schools and institutions to determine if we can find new and more effective ways of addressing the challenges.


Via Bobbi Dunham, juandoming
more...
Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, April 30, 10:51 AM

"...if the public systems do not provide what the students want for the future, the private sector will step in." Yep.