critical reasoning
2.7K views | +1 today
Follow
 
Scooped by iPamba
onto critical reasoning
Scoop.it!

You don't need an app for that

You don't need an app for that | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Are the simplest phones the smartest? While the rest of the world is updating statuses and playing games on smartphones, Africa is developing useful SMS-based solutions to everyday needs, says journalist Toby Shapshak. In this eye-opening talk, Shapshak explores the frontiers of mobile invention in Africa as he asks us to reconsider our preconceived notions of innovation.
more...
No comment yet.
critical reasoning
Informed, openminded, fairminded, courageous, creative
Curated by iPamba
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Do not resuscitate orders placed on patients without consent, says study

Do not resuscitate orders placed on patients without consent, says study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
An audit of 9,000 patients by the Royal College of Physicians showed 20% of families were not told that CPR would not be attempted on loved ones
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Yes you can! The dangers of ‘character education’ in universities

Yes you can! The dangers of ‘character education’ in universities | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews"


From Academica Top Ten - Monday, May 2, 2016


"Examining the dark side of “character education” The concept of “character education” might be gaining in popularity among educators, writes David Matthews for Times Higher Education, but the practice runs a major risk of overshadowing the grim realities of inequality. The concept of character education is premised on the idea that teaching students to have an optimistic “growth mindset” can increase social mobility for students from challenging backgrounds. Yet for Matthews, this premise avoids the more challenging question of “how do you engender a positive outlook in students without gliding over the fact that things will be harder, perhaps much harder, for some of them because of their background?” While Matthews admits to the benefits of believing in one’s ability to achieve anything, he adds that, “the problem is, in many cases, it’s simply not true.” "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

‘We’ve had massacres all week’: Aleppo on fire again as Assad consigns ceasefire to history

‘We’ve had massacres all week’: Aleppo on fire again as Assad consigns ceasefire to history | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Even those familiar with the worst of the Syrian conflict are shaken by the scale of the latest assault, as bombs and guns seek out civilian targets
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Vulnerable people regularly refused access to GPs, says charity

Vulnerable people regularly refused access to GPs, says charity | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Refusals often due to lack of ID or proof of address even though none is needed, according to Doctors of the World
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The airstrike on an Aleppo hospital is a wake-up call for the UN. It must act now | Joanne Lui and Peter Maurer

The airstrike on an Aleppo hospital is a wake-up call for the UN. It must act now | Joanne Lui and Peter Maurer | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"The world is witnessing a sustained assault on the provision of healthcare in times of conflict. The principle that care comes first has to be enforced"


"At 10pm two nights ago, the al-Quds hospital in the north Syrian city of Aleppo came under attack. With an airstrike, the 34-bed hospital which offered services including an emergency room, intensive care unit, operating theatre and the cities’ main referral centre for paediatrics was completely destroyed. 


 Surrounded in darkness and dust, surviving patients, staff and volunteers began to dig out those caught in the rubble. Eight doctors worked full-time in the hospital, two of whom were among the 14 confirmed dead. Their dedication and commitment to providing medical care to those in need resulted in the ultimate sacrifice. 


Inside the Kunduz hospital attack: ‘It was a scene of nightmarish horror' Read more Sadly, this is not an isolated case. 


From Afghanistan to the Central African Republic, from South Sudan to Yemen and Ukraine, ambulances, hospitals and health centres have been bombed, looted, burned and destroyed. Patients have been killed in their beds; health workers have been attacked as they rescued the wounded."

iPamba's insight:
We should add Grenada and Gaza to the list of places where hospitals, patients and health care workers have been bombed, killed, and forgotten.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Managing an anxiety disorder in academia is a full-time job

Managing an anxiety disorder in academia is a full-time job | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The thought of speaking at conferences fills me with panic and the lack of job security is a constant worry, but there are ways to cope
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Globe and Mail columnist Margaret Wente caught up in plagiarism scandal — again | Toronto Star

Globe and Mail columnist Margaret Wente caught up in plagiarism scandal — again | Toronto Star | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"The newspaper has corrected two online versions of Wente’s columns to include proper attribution."


"Ann Rauhala, an associate professor at Ryerson’s school of journalism, said it seems from the Globe’s “rapid and fairly firm” response that people at the paper are taking the incident very seriously. 


“The reaction that I hear in the sort of broader journalistic community is, ‘oh no, not again,’ followed by a variation of ‘Gee, how is it that she still has a job as a columnist?’” Rauhala said. “It damages everybody’s credibility when somebody with such a privileged position and such an enviable platform appears not to play by the rules,” she added. 


Rauhala said it was “really interesting” that the Globe’s public editor reproduced part of the paper’s code of conduct in her responding column and that Walmsley said the incident should not have happened. But she still has questions. “What does that mean: ‘working with Peggy to ensure this cannot happen again?’ 


I think people are wondering,” Rauhala said, adding that part of the column has provoked some “raised eyebrows and smiles” among people she knows who care about journalism. 


“I would love to know how this happens,” she added. "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The Top 5 Faculty Morale Killers

The Top 5 Faculty Morale Killers | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"A good midlevel manager can make all the difference in determining whether faculty life is satisfying or unbearable."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday, April 27, 2016


"Prof-turned-admin lists top five ways to kill faculty morale “I know firsthand how department chairs can make faculty lives easier,” writes Rob Jenkins for the Chronicle of Higher Education, “and I also know what they do (all too often) that makes faculty lives more difficult.” Jenkins highlights a set of five “faculty morale killers” that mid-level academic managers are often guilty of: micromanagement, trust issues, hogging the spotlight, assigning blame, and blatant careerism. The author concludes that instead of falling into these common traps, “effective leaders try to create a workplace where people are comfortable and fulfilled, where they feel valued and believe what they’re doing has meaning.”"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Isn’t asking for alumni donations, well, just weird?

Isn’t asking for alumni donations, well, just weird? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Richard Budd mulls the logic of giving money to your alma mater"


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Tuesday, April 26, 2016


"Questioning the institutional practice of asking for alumni donations “I didn’t pay to do my undergraduate degree, paid for my master’s, and was then on a scholarship for my PhD. Am I duty bound, in some way, to pay again?” asks Richard Budd before discussing the purpose and mentality behind alumni donations. Budd questions the morality of public universities asking for donations after charging students for tuition. He then briefly discusses the history and tradition of universities asking for donations, as well as the institution’s need for funding to compete on a national and international level. “The state should, I think, support universities to the point where they don’t need to look elsewhere,” he concludes, “I just can’t get my head around the moral logic of the thing, whichever way you slice it—let’s face it, alumni donations are just weird.”"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Atheist pastor sparks debate by 'irritating the church into the 21st century'

Atheist pastor sparks debate by 'irritating the church into the 21st century' | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Can a minister in a Christian church be an atheist? That’s the question facing the United church of Canada as it wrestles with the case of Gretta Vosper
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Why Merriam-Webster Finally Added 'Genderqueer' and 'Transphobia' to the Dictionary

Why Merriam-Webster Finally Added 'Genderqueer' and 'Transphobia' to the Dictionary | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A conversation about Merriam-Webster’s newest words with a professional lexicographer
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The Stubborn Wealth Gap in Who Earns a College Degree

The Stubborn Wealth Gap in Who Earns a College Degree | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A new report demonstrates a stubborn chasm between rich and poor students earning bachelor’s degrees.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

New NUS president accuses media of printing falsehoods

New NUS president accuses media of printing falsehoods | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Malia Bouattia says newspaper reports that she is antisemitic and supports Islamic State are ‘simply not true’
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Defending Israel, PEN says it can’t support ‘cultural boycotts of any kind’ — but it does!

Defending Israel, PEN says it can’t support ‘cultural boycotts of any kind’ — but it does! | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The writers' organization PEN urges Enrique Iglesias not to play Azerbaijan because of its political prisoners, but it accepts money from Israel as a champion of its world voices festival, even as Marilyn Hacker, Richard Ford and Junot Diaz urge it not to accept the money.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Michael Coren - How to lose religion and find new faith

Michael Coren - How to lose religion and find new faith | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Author Michael Coren and activist Andray Domise write about how leaving their respective places of worship brought them together, even though they have often opposed one another's views.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Unearthing the Atrocities of Nazi Death Camps

Unearthing the Atrocities of Nazi Death Camps | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Forensic archaeologists are finally exploring what lies beneath the dirt—but not without resistance
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

 The Joke of U.S. Justice and “Accountability” When They Bomb a Hospital    :  Information Clearing House - ICH

 The Joke of U.S. Justice and “Accountability” When They Bomb a Hospital    :  Information Clearing House - ICH | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
By Glenn Greenwald April 30, 2016 "Information Clearing House" - "The Intercept"- 

 Ever since the U.S. last October bombed a hospital run by Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Kunduz, Afghanistan, the U.S. vehemently denied guilt while acting exactly like a guilty party would. First, it changed its story repeatedly. Then, it blocked every effort – including repeated demands from MSF – to have an independent investigation determine what really happened. 

As May Jeong documented in a richly reported story for The Intercept yesterday, the Afghan government – rather than denying that the hospital was targeted – instead repeatedly claimed that doing so was justified; moreover, they were sympathetic to calls for an independent investigation, which the U.S. blocked. 

What is beyond dispute, as Jeong wrote, is that the “211 shells that were fired . . . were felt by the 42 men, women, and children who were killed.” MSF insisted the bombing was “deliberate,” and ample evidence supports that charge. 

 Despite all this, the U.S. military is about to release a report that, so predictably, exonerates itself from all guilt; it was, of course, all just a terribly tragic mistake. Worse, reports The Los Angeles Times‘ W.J. Hennigan, “no one will face criminal charges.” Instead, this is the “justice” being meted out to those responsible: One officer was suspended from command and ordered out of Afghanistan. The others were given lesser punishments: Six were sent to counseling, seven were issued letters of reprimand, and two were ordered to retraining courses. 

 MSF continues to insist that the attack was a “war crime” and must be investigated by an independent tribunal under the Geneva Conventions. In a statement this week, Amnesty International said that it has “serious concerns about the Department of Defense’s questionable track record of policing itself.” The LA Times story notes that Physicians for Human Rights said in a letter to the White House that “the gravity of harm caused by the reported failures to follow protocol in Kunduz appears to constitute gross negligence that warrants active pursuit of criminal liability.” 

 But none of that matters. The only law to which the U.S. government is subject is its own interests. U.S. officials scoffed at global demands for a real investigation into what took place here, and then doled out “punishments” of counseling, training classes, and letters of reprimand for those responsible for this carnage. That’s almost a worse insult, a more extreme expression of self-exoneration and indifference, than no sanctions at all. 

But that’s par for the course in a country that has granted full-scale legal immunity for those who perpetrated the most egregious crimes: from the systemic fraud that caused the 2008 financial crisis to the worldwide regime of torture the U.S. government officially implemented. 

Yesterday in Syria, an MSF-run hospital was targeted with an airstrike, almost certainly deliberately, by what was very likely the Syrian government or the Russians, killing at least 50 patients and doctors, including one of the last pediatricians in Aleppo. 

On behalf of the U.S. government, Secretary of State John Kerry pronounced: “We are outraged by yesterday’s airstrikes in Aleppo on the al Quds hospital supported by both Doctors Without Borders and the International Committee of the Red Cross, which killed dozens of people, including children, patients and medical personnel.” On the list of those with even minimal credibility to denounce that horrific airstrike, Kerry and his fellow American officials do not appear.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

CV of failures: Princeton professor publishes resume of his career lows

CV of failures: Princeton professor publishes resume of his career lows | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Johannes Haushofer bravely posts document listing degree programs he did not get in to and academic positions he did not get
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

A healthy biosphere means healthier humans

A healthy biosphere means healthier humans | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Our health is tied to air, water and food from the soil. That means we should keep them clean, and stop dumping toxic wastes into them. Our health is also improved by exercise, which should be part of the way we live. Outdoor exercise is especially good. Caring for ourselves and the biosphere would pay many times over in improved health and happiness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

'To Disenfranchise Every Negro That I Could'

'To Disenfranchise Every Negro That I Could' | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A century ago, the commonwealth's leaders weren't circumspect about their motives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Ontario’s PhD Graduates from 2009: Where are they now?

Ontario’s PhD Graduates from 2009: Where are they now? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Linda Jonker, 
Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario Report hi​ghlights | Report

"When it comes to jobs, Ontario's PhD is working There's new hope for today's beleaguered PhDs. Amid pessimistic reports about job prospects for university doctoral students, a new study by the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) finds that the PhD is working. Project description Using an internet-based search, the study examined the career outcomes of 2,310 doctoral students who graduated from Ontario universities in 2009. The study found that half of the PhDs are working in postsecondary education and more than a third are working in business, industry and other fields outside of the academy. Half are employed in Ontario while the remainder are evenly divided between the rest of Canada, the United States and other countries."

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday, April 27, 2016:

"Half of 2009 Ontario PhD grads working in academia, says HEQCO study A new study by HEQCO on the career outcomes of Ontario PhD graduates has found that half of the doctoral students who graduated in 2009 are working in academia, and another 35% are currently employed outside the academy. Simona Chiose of the Globe and Mail touches on many aspects of the discussion around the size, funding, and changing strategies of Canada’s PhD production. Chiose explains that the study’s results also suggest that PhDs who hope to teach will need to attend a leading institution for the best opportunities. “Everybody wants to hear what happens to PhD graduates,” said study author Linda Jonker, “we hear that they can’t find jobs, but this [study] sheds light on where they are working.”"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

Arizona, amid cuts to higher ed, may help centers supported by Charles Koch

Arizona, amid cuts to higher ed, may help centers supported by Charles Koch | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
As Arizona institutions continue to struggle with deep cuts to state funding, some wonder why on-campus 'freedom centers' funded by the Charles Koch Foundation could get $5 million grant.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

A Damning Report on Mexico's Missing 43 Students

A Damning Report on Mexico's Missing 43 Students | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights found major inconsistencies with the government’s official investigation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The US Founding Fathers Weren’t Concerned With Inequality

The US Founding Fathers Weren’t Concerned With Inequality | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Economic disparity is a problem that has grown along with the nation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by iPamba
Scoop.it!

The importance of developing hard data about the value of the humanities (essay)

The importance of developing hard data about the value of the humanities (essay) | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Several dozen faculty members, administrators, employers, and others recently came together to discuss how to measure student success in the humanities. Paula M. Krebs describes some of the strategies they identified. 
more...
No comment yet.