critical reasoning
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critical reasoning
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Inside the golden-yellow spice turmeric lurks a chemical deceiver: curcumin

Inside the golden-yellow spice turmeric lurks a chemical deceiver: curcumin | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Curcumin dupes assays and leads some drug hunters astray"


"Inside the golden-yellow spice turmeric lurks a chemical deceiver: curcumin, a molecule that is widely touted as having medicinal activity, but which also gives false signals in drug screening tests. For years, chemists have urged caution about curcumin and other compounds that can mislead naive drug hunters. "

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New Evidence of the Superiority of Female Doctors

New Evidence of the Superiority of Female Doctors | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
New research estimates that if all physicians were female, 32,000 fewer Americans would die every year.
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No, Abortion Doesn't Cause Anxiety or Depression

No, Abortion Doesn't Cause Anxiety or Depression | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A new study finds there’s no evidence to support mandatory abortion counseling that warns women about the negative mental-health impacts of abortion.
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Sexism and Gender Inequality: Emasculated Men Refuse to Do Chores—Except Cooking

Sexism and Gender Inequality: Emasculated Men Refuse to Do Chores—Except Cooking | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"When their manhood is threatened, men react by doing less housework. The only exception? Meal preparation."


"For some men, these are scary times. Men lost jobs in the recession, and women outnumber them on college campuses. (Some are predicting, in fact, that we’re witnessing the end of men.) 


As I’ve written, one way some men are responding to their slipping place in the social hierarchy is by supporting Donald Trump, whose rhetoric hearkens to a less progressive, more traditional time. 


But another way men react to having their masculinity threatened is stealthier. They do fewer chores, according to an analysis by Dan Cassino, a professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University, and his wife Yasemin Besen-Cassino, from Montclair State University, which relied on the American Time Use Study. 


According to their findings, men especially avoid housework just when you’d think they would pick up the slack: When they make less than their wives do. 


Overall in the U.S., women clean more than men do. American men did an average of 15 minutes of housework each day, while women did 45, the Cassinos write. Most men—77 percent—did no housework on any given day, while most women—55 percent—did at least some."

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Why is so much research dodgy? Blame the Research Excellence Framework

Why is so much research dodgy? Blame the Research Excellence Framework | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The Ref star system encourages novelty but offers no incentive to replicate studies – and that’s exactly what scientists need to do to be more sure of our claims
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Don't call low-income fathers dead-beat dads - Futurity

Don't call low-income fathers dead-beat dads - Futurity | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Low-income African-American fathers are often criticized for not being involved with their children, but a new study finds those charges are largely untrue.
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Preschool teachers keep closer eye on black boys - Futurity

Preschool teachers keep closer eye on black boys - Futurity | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Eye-tracking technology reveals implicit racial bias on the part of preschool teachers, but the outcome depends on the teacher's own race, say researchers.
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Mental Health on College and University Campuses in Ontario - Executive Summary, Spring 2016 Report

Mental Health on College and University Campuses in Ontario - Executive Summary, Spring 2016 Report | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
"The ACHA-NCHA II supports the health of the campus community by fulfilling the academic mission, supporting short- and long-term healthy behaviors, and gaining a current profile of health trends within the campus community. "
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Race, Gender & Inequality - Researchers aren't talking to LGB teens of color - Futurity

Race, Gender & Inequality - Researchers aren't talking to LGB teens of color - Futurity | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Past studies have focused on "negative outcomes among LGB youth of color, and we're not focused on any of their normative experiences as people."
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Study shows degree completion time in Maritimes 4.6 years

Study shows degree completion time in Maritimes 4.6 years | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Maritime students are spending more time on their first degrees and the New Brunswick Student Alliance is hoping the timely completion benefit will cater to five years rather than four."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, September 22, 2016:


"Most undergrads in Maritimes do not finish in four years, says MPHEC 


University students in the Maritimes take on average 4.8 years to complete an undergraduate degree, according to new research by the Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission. 


The research found that one of the main reasons students do not complete their degree in four years is a change of school or field of study, as only 16% of students affected by this factor finish in four years. 


The study found, however, that even for students who remain in the same school and program, only 64% finish in four years. 


New Brunswick Student Alliance Executive Director Robert Burroughs argues that these findings should result in a change in the province’s timely completion benefit. 


“Why have a timely completion benefit for four years if we know the average is five years … To reduce student debt, why would you not add that additional year on to the timely completion,” said Burroughs."

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Parenting: Harsh Parents Raise Bullies--So Do Permissive Ones

Parenting: Harsh Parents Raise Bullies--So Do Permissive Ones | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Research supports a moderate, supportive style of parenting"


"Taken together, the studies indicate that the best parenting tactics probably fall in the middle of the spectrum. Indeed, studies have shown that a protective factor against being bullied or becoming a bully is having parents who are facilitative, meaning warm and responsive to their children and encouraging of appropriate levels of autonomy (rather than being either controlling or overly permissive). A 2015 study of 215 grade school children, reported in the Journal of Child and Family Studies, found that bullied children were consistently rated by teachers as having less facilitative parenting than nonbullied children. A 2016 study from the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry followed kids for five years and found that those whose parents supported autonomy when the kids were four or five years old bullied less over time than those whose parents showed less support for autonomy."

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One-in-10 post-secondary students face unwanted advances, assaults: survey

One-in-10 post-secondary students face unwanted advances, assaults: survey | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A new survey of Canadian university and college students finds many have struggled with mental health issues, while a disturbing number have also faced unwanted sexual advances and assaults.
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Black patients half as likely to receive pain medication as white patients, study finds

Black patients half as likely to receive pain medication as white patients, study finds | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
“This study unfortunately tells us what we already know – black patients are improperly treated for pain and that is mostly because of their skin color,” said Keisha Ray, a postdoctoral fellow with the McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

She said the fundamental problem is that black patients are treated as an “other”.

This has been suggested for decades, but was starkly depicted in an April study about how disparities in pain management may be attributable to bias from medical providers who believe things such as that black people age more slowly than white people, and that black people’s blood coagulates more quickly than white peoples.

“Black patients are not afforded the luxury of being seen in EDs, physician offices, and clinics as just patients in need of help and healing,” Ray said. “Rather they are seen as less than human, drug seekers and overall exaggerators.”

Ray and others said that because some clinicians assume black people are more likely to be addicts, they are less likely to receive pain medication.
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I’ll say it again: E-cigarettes are still far safer than smoking

I’ll say it again: E-cigarettes are still far safer than smoking | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Despite evidence suggesting e-cigarettes are far less harmful than smoking, more people than ever believe them to be just as harmful. Professor Linda Bauld discusses the evidence
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94% of ON university grads find well-paying jobs within 24 months of finishing school: survey

94% of ON university grads find well-paying jobs within 24 months of finishing school: survey | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Results of the 2015 graduate survey, including employment rates and earnings of 2013 graduates six months and two years after graduation.


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, December 15, 2016


"94% of ON university grads find well-paying jobs within 24 months of finishing school: survey 


More than nine out of ten university graduates from Ontario find well-paying jobs within two years of graduating, according to a new study conducted for the province’s Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development. 


The survey-based study showed that university graduates in full-time jobs earn an average salary of almost $42K six months after graduation, and an average of more than $49K after two years. 


The report also found that employment rates and earnings for university undergraduates were higher than they were for any other level of education. 


A large majority of recent graduates in full-time jobs also said that their work was related to the skills they developed in their program of study. 


“In a complex and ever-changing world, Ontario’s universities are helping to build a brighter future for graduates, their families and communities, and the province,” said Council of Ontario Universities President David Lindsay."

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Non-religious students more likely to radicalize than religious, says CEGEP survey

Non-religious students more likely to radicalize than religious, says CEGEP survey | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"A survey of students at eight Quebec CEGEPs published Tuesday has led to some surprising conclusions about what makes youths vulnerable to radicalization — and what may shield them from it.

For one, the youths most supportive of violence did not fit the profile we are used to hearing from police or politicians: It turns out Quebecers and second-generation immigrants are more likely to turn to violent solutions than first-generation immigrants.

What’s more, religion — and religious or spiritual practice — can protect youths from becoming radicalized to violence, the survey suggests, upending our common notions of religiously motivated youths joining Daesh or other jihadi groups. 

Students who said they had no religion tended to support violent radicalization more than those who said they are Christian or Muslim."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, October 27, 2016:


"Non-religious students more likely to radicalize than religious, says CEGEP survey 


A survey of students at eight Quebec CEGEPs has defied many popular assumptions about religion and radicalization, reports the Montreal Gazette. 


One of the report’s core findings was that youths who were most supportive of violence were less likely to identify as religious than those who did not support violence. 


Further, second-generation immigrants were found to have a higher likelihood of being radical than first-generation immigrants. “It goes against our pre-conceived notions—this is not a problem with immigrants or religion but one that can affect us all,” said SHERPA Director and child psychiatrist Cécile Rousseau."

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These findings beg the question: Is there a correlation between "radicalization" and the marginalization, social inequality or second-class citizenship experienced by Canadians who are not only outside the "mainstream," but who also bear the brunt of mainstreamed negative representations of their ancestral cultures?
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Study finds large gap between graduation rates of black, white football players

Study finds large gap between graduation rates of black, white football players | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
New report finds big-time college football players at wealthiest programs graduate at rates lower than their nonathlete male peers. For black players, the gap is even bigger.
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Parenting, chores, and childcare - Children Mean Stress for Mom and Joy for Dad

Parenting, chores, and childcare - Children Mean Stress for Mom and Joy for Dad | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"And much of the time that fathers spend with children is family time, when the mother is also present, Musick said, so, men don’t have sole responsibility for the children as often as mothers. NeuroscienceNews.com image is for illustrative purposes only."


"Summary: According to researchers, parenting carries more stress and strain for moms. 


Source: Cornell University. 


A new study from a Cornell University sociologist shows that while parents enjoy the time they spend with their children, parenting carries more strain for mothers. 


That is likely, the researchers found, because moms spend more time with their kids while doing more onerous chores like basic childcare, cooking and cleaning, whereas dads spend more time with children in enjoyable, low-stress activities like play and leisure. Mothers also do more solo parenting, experience more sleep disruptions and have less leisure time, which are all associated with lower levels of well-being."

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A Guide to the Changing Science of Flu Shots

A Guide to the Changing Science of Flu Shots | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Despite new findings, certain advice still holds true
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Canada's racial divide: Confronting racism in our own backyard

Canada's racial divide: Confronting racism in our own backyard | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A common national narrative holds the country as a bastion of multiculturalism and inclusiveness, especially compared with the United States, but it’s a narrative that glosses over some harsh truths
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'Lives at stake': campus counsellors say province must address mental health 'crisis' - CBC Report

'Lives at stake': campus counsellors say province must address mental health 'crisis' - CBC Report | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Ontario must develop a plan to deal with the increase in students arriving on campus who need mental health services, say provincial counsellors who work with them."


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Tuesday, September 27, 2016:


"Growing demand for mental health leads to call for ON-wide strategy 


Campus counsellors on Ontario college and university campuses are overwhelmed by the growing need for mental health services, reports CBC. 


A recent study released by the Ontario University and College Health Association highlighted the increased rates of anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, and suicide attempts among postsecondary students in the province. 


“Many of us who oversee counselling services describe our day as using a finger to stop a flood and the demand for our services far outstrips our capacity to support students,” states Meg Houghton, OUCHA president and Humber College Director of Student Access, Wellness and Development. 


In response to the difficulties around meeting the increased demand, Houghton states that OUCHA hopes ON will move to develop a province-wide strategy to deliver mental health services."

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“Zero correlation” between teaching quality and ratings on student evaluations, says study

“Zero correlation” between teaching quality and ratings on student evaluations, says study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

New study adds to evidence that student reviews of professors have limited validity.


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday, September 22, 2016:


"“Zero correlation” between teaching quality and ratings on student evaluations, says study 


A new study has provided further evidence that “student evaluations of teaching are unreliable due to various kinds of biases against instructors,” writes Colleen Flaherty for Inside Higher Ed, yet institutions continue to consult these evaluations when making career-shaping decisions. 


Flaherty points to a number of studies suggesting that student evaluations of teaching have little to no connection with the amount of learning achieved, and cites new research showing that even “past analyses linking student achievement to high student teaching evaluation ratings are flawed, a mere ‘artifact of small sample sized studies and publication bias.’”"

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EduData – The landscape of learning outcomes assessment in Canada | it's not academic - HEQCO

EduData – The landscape of learning outcomes assessment in Canada | it's not academic - HEQCO | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Summary from Academica Top Ten - Thursday 15 September 2016:

"Colleges and universities use learning outcomes assessment in similar ways says report A new report out of the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario has found that the Canadian college and university sectors are very similar when it comes to the thoughts and practices around learning outcomes assessments. The report found that over half of the surveyed Canadian colleges and just over two-fifths of Canadian universities use institutional learning outcomes. Colleges most commonly use employer and alumni surveys as an assessment tool, while universities most commonly turned to national student surveys. Colleges used the results of these assessments for program reviews and curriculum modification, while universities used them for program accreditation and curriculum modification."
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One-fifth of postsecondary students are depressed and anxious or have other mental health issues

One-fifth of postsecondary students are depressed and anxious or have other mental health issues | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Canada may be a wealthy country, but there appear to be alarming rates of depression and suicidal thoughts among its youth."


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Inequality in the Academe: Growing evidence of anti-female bias in student surveys

Inequality in the Academe: Growing evidence of anti-female bias in student surveys | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

"Dutch researchers find female academics 11 percentage points less likely to hit promotion threshold in course evaluations"


Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday, August 17, 2017:


"European study lends further evidence for gender bias in student evaluations A new European study suggests that female postsecondary instructors are judged more harshly than their male peers in course evaluations, reports the Times Higher Education. The study looked at five years’ worth of evaluations from Erasmus University Rotterdam’s International Institute of Social Studies, and found that female lecturers were 11 percentage points less likely to receive an average score of at least four out of five from their students. THE reports that the study’s findings are part of a growing body of evidence that gender bias is a pervasive problem in student surveys, a problem that has led many to question the validity of using such surveys to inform tenure and promotion decisions."

iPamba's insight:
These consistent results beg the question: what happens when race and other marginalized differences are factored into the equation?
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