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critical reasoning
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Millennials not as selfish as some people think - CBC News reports on new study

Millennials not as selfish as some people think - CBC News reports on new study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Some have said the millennial generation want it all without having to work for it. But that perception is at odds with the latest research.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - 23 June 2015

Millennials not as entitled as some may think, UBC study finds

A recent study from UBC finds that millennials (people born between the early 1980s and 2000s) might not warrant the “entitlement generation” label that many have applied to them. The study found that governments currently spend three times as much on a retiree as they do on someone under 45. Paul Kershaw of the School of Population and Public Health at UBC said of this discrepancy, “I think that’s one of the places where actually we need younger Canadians to feel more entitled. More entitled to have a world of politics that works for them simultaneously while it works for others, including the people that they love, like their parents and grandparents.” Kershaw also noted that according to existing polls, millennials value money and wealth much less than those over 45, citing fulfillment and making a difference as their highest priorities.

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Not Good Enough: A Report Card on Canada’s Labour Market Information · Canadian Chamber of Commerce

Not Good Enough: A Report Card on Canada’s Labour Market Information · Canadian Chamber of Commerce | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary from Academica Top Ten 26 May 2015

CCC says Canada's labour market information is not good enough
A report released last week by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CCC) says that "the federal government is delivering a poor performance" when it comes to providing labour market information. Canada earned its highest grade, a "B," for information on labour force needs by geographic area, a slight improvement since 2014. Elsewhere, the verdict is not as positive. Areas of particular weakness include information on future labour force needs and on workforce training. The CCC says the government should make data more accessible and user-friendly; coordinate and aggregate sector-specific projections with its broad-based projections; and support a publicly funded, arm's-length agency to prepare labour market information for public consumption. Globe and Mail | CCC News Release | Full Report
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Do tall people really deserve to earn more?

Do tall people really deserve to earn more? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A new study says tall people are more prosperous because on average they are cleverer and have better social skills. So what are short people supposed to do?
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To protect teens, don't keep them offline - Parent based on empowerment, not fear - Penn State study

To protect teens, don't keep them offline - Parent based on empowerment, not fear - Penn State study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The best way to keep teenagers safe isn't keeping them off the internet entirely. Teaching them to be resilient is a better option, say researchers.
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Teens and tech: what happens when students give up smartphones?

Teens and tech: what happens when students give up smartphones? | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A recent project challenged young people to go cold turkey on using digital devices for a week. The results suggest compulsion – not addiction – is the issue
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Reliance on smartphones linked to lazy thinking | Waterloo News

Reliance on smartphones linked to lazy thinking | Waterloo News | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Tues March 10, 2015

uWaterloo researchers link smartphone use to lazy thinking

A new study from researchers at the University of Waterloo suggests that an over-reliance on smartphones can lead to "lazy thinking." The study, published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior, found that persons who are intuitive thinkers—that is, those who typically rely on instinct when making a decision—are likely to rely on their phone rather than think through problems themselves. "They may look up information that they actually know or could easily learn, but are unwilling to make the effort to actually think about it," said Gordon Pennycook, co-lead author of the study. Study participants who had stronger cognitive skills and who were likely to engage in analytical thought were less likely to rely on their phones than intuitive thinkers. Researchers say that their findings suggest an association between heavy smartphone use and lowered intelligence; they also suggest that a reliance on smartphones may have consequences for an aging population. uWaterloo News Release

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Three to five cups of coffee a day may prevent heart attacks, says study

Three to five cups of coffee a day may prevent heart attacks, says study | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Research highlights potential link between coffee consumption and lower risk of developing clogged arteries
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Placebo, Are You There? « Science-Based Medicine

Placebo, Are You There? « Science-Based Medicine | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
By Jean Brissonnet, translation by Harriet Hall Note: This was originally published as 'Placebo, es-tu là?' in Science et pseudo-sciences 294, p. 38-48...
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Why Canadians shouldn't worry about where universities appear in roller coaster global ranking

Why Canadians shouldn't worry about where universities appear in roller coaster global ranking | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Recent international rankings of universities seem to show that Canada’s major universities are slipping. But looking closer, we’re in fact not doing badly.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Tuesday February 24, 2015

Why Canadians shouldn't worry about where universities appear in global rankings
Canadians institutions shouldn't worry too much about their placement in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings, argue Robert Lacroix and Louis Maheu. Lacroix and Maheu say that the THE rankings are highly unstable, especially when it comes to evaluating reputational factors. They suggest that Canadian schools' performance have been hit significantly hard by these subjective scores: in the THE rankings, the 2 factors influenced by reputational surveys accounted for 94% of Canadian schools' drop in total score. In contrast, Canadian universities' performances in the Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities have been more stable, possibly because those rankings do not include a reputational survey. Lacroix and Maheu also apply a 6-factor macro-economic model to compare research-intensive universities. When applying this model, they found that Canada has a higher proportion of research universities among the top 200 than expected. This finding corroborates their belief that countries with higher economic density tend to perform better under some ranking methodologies.University Affairs

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What do the numbers mean? Ryerson, Acadia University statements on CBC's campus sexual assaults report

What do the numbers mean? Ryerson, Acadia University statements on CBC's campus sexual assaults report | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Statements by universities named in the CBC News campus sexual assaults report, published verbatim.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wed Feb 11, 2015

Institutions respond to CBC sexual assault report
A number of institutions have responded to CBC's coverage of sexual assault reporting on Canadian PSE campuses. The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) issued a statement that emphasized some of the shortcomings in CBC's methodology. AUCC said that "the overall tone suggested that universities with high levels of reported assaults were in the wrong. But as CBC's own details on its methodology point out, the results cannot be interpreted as a 'scorecard,' and institutions differ in how they gather and report data." AUCC also suggested that CBC had overstated the incidence of sexual assaults, and said that "news reports that take aim at universities that have higher numbers of reported assaults are misleading and dangerous." Ryerson University and Acadia University also issued statements that were published on CBC's website. Ryerson noted that the figures it provided to CBC included "non-community members reporting incidents that happened within our precinct, which extends over a large area of Toronto," and questioned the comparability of the data provided by different institutions. Acadia, meanwhile, acknowledged that under-reporting is a serious issue and said that it includes a wide range of activities under its definition of what constitutes sexual assault; this may lead to the appearance of a higher incident rate. The presidents of Ontario's public colleges recently approved a policy framework on sexual assault, and the presidents of Ontario's universities are also pursuing a series of initiatives to curb sexual violence on campus.

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Most patients 'too optimistic' about medicine

Most patients 'too optimistic' about medicine | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Most people overestimate the benefits and underestimate the harms of medical tests and treatments, a new study has found.
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Next: Dealing with opportunities and challenges from mood-altering consumer wearables | SharpBrains

Next: Dealing with opportunities and challenges from mood-altering consumer wearables | SharpBrains | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
CES: what would blow your mind — brain-zapping head­set or smart ket­tle? (Finan­cial Times):

“A three-year-old start-up called Thync wanted to strap a pro­to­type of its brain-zapping head­set to my tem­ples, with the inten­tion of alter­ing my mood. As wear­able devices go, it sounded a refresh­ing change from another jumped-up pedometer…

Thync’s pitch is that it can “merge tech­nol­ogy with biol­ogy”, and stim­u­late spe­cific neural path­ways to affect mood. As well as a calm­ing zap, it offers a caffeine-level hit of energy, which I did not try. The com­pany says the head­set can be safely used sev­eral times a day, and has con­ducted tri­als on 3,000 peo­ple over 18 months. It is work­ing with the Food and Drug Admin­is­tra­tion to ensure its safety.”
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High-profile academic fraud a symptom of underlying dysfunction | University Affairs

High-profile academic fraud a symptom of underlying dysfunction | University Affairs | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
ABOUT MELONIE FULLICKMelonie Fullick is a PhD candidate at York University. The topic of her dissertation is Canadian post-secondary education policy and its effects on the institutional environment in universities.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday 17 January, 2015:

Academic fraud a result of “underlying dysfunction”

After numerous irregularities were discovered, Science retracted a study by Michael LaCour that purported to show that a brief conversation with a canvasser had a lasting impact on a voter’s views on marriage equality. New York Magazine has described it as “one of the biggest scientific frauds in recent memory.” This scandal, writes Melonie Fullick in University Affairs, should not be viewed as a one-off, but as the product of a dysfunctional system in which “only one particular, narrow version of ‘best’ is noted and rewarded.” “We can’t complain about high-profile cases like this without also engaging in some critical reflection on the system in which such incidents can happen," Fullick writes. 

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Why Integrating America’s Neighborhoods and Cities Is Harder Than We Think

Why Integrating America’s Neighborhoods and Cities Is Harder Than We Think | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
There’s no question that white Americans prefer white neighborhoods. As I noted in a Wednesday column, “20 percent of whites said their ideal neighborhood was all white … [a]nd only 25 percent of white respondents said they would live in a neighborhood where one-half of their neighbors were black.” At...
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Poverty levels are strongly associated with active fracking wells in Pennsylvania

Poverty levels are strongly associated with active fracking wells in Pennsylvania | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

May 6, 2015 |By Brian Bienkowski and Environmental Health News

"Poor in Pennsylvania? You're more likely to be fracked"


"Fracking wells in Pennsylvania’s Marcellus Shale region are disproportionately located in poor rural communities, which bear the brunt of associated pollution, according to a new study.

 

"The study bolsters concerns that poor people are more likely to deal with hydraulic fracturing in their community and raises concerns that such vulnerable populations will suffer the potential health impacts of air and water pollution associated with pulling gas from the ground.

 

"“This trend is not one we’re surprised by, we see this in a lot of industries,” said Mike Ewall, founder and director of Energy Justice Network, a nonprofit organization that works with U.S. communities dealing with pollution from energy."


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12 Must-Read Books on Education for 2015 - InformED

12 Must-Read Books on Education for 2015 - InformED | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Few things are more satisfying than finally getting your hands on a book you've been meaning to read. In 2015, you're going to want to make room in your
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Black gay privilege is a ridiculous notion | Zach Stafford

Black gay privilege is a ridiculous notion | Zach Stafford | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
A recent study alleges that black gay men get similar salaries to white straight men. That couldn’t sound further from the truth
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Footing the bill - students shouldn't have to pay to attend college and university - new Canadian poll

Footing the bill - students shouldn't have to pay to attend college and university - new Canadian poll | critical reasoning | Scoop.it

More than half of Canadians think university and college tuition should be free, a new poll released exclusively to The London Free Press reveals.

 

Summary from Academica Top Ten - Wednesday 22 April, 2015

Poll finds that most Canadians think students shouldn't have to pay for PSE
A new Canadian poll has found that the majority (53%) of respondents believe students should not have to pay for PSE. Respondents that are less wealthy, or located in BC or Atlantic Canada were more likely to agree that PSE should be free for the majority of Canadians. In addition, 75% of respondents said they thought that having a diploma or degree led to a higher quality of life. However, only 6% said that Canada's PSE system contributed the most to quality of life, compared to the health care system, justice system, and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Cape Breton University President David Wheeler recently called for a national debate on free education on Academica's Rethinking Higher Ed forum. London Free Press    
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Heavy smartphone use linked to lazy thinking, study finds

Heavy smartphone use linked to lazy thinking, study finds | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Love them or hate them, smartphones have undoubtely changed the way we consume and recall information — but they may also be hindering the average human's ability to solve problems without one.
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Do Spayed and Neutered Dogs Get Cancer More Often? | Dog Spies, Scientific American Blog Network

Do Spayed and Neutered Dogs Get Cancer More Often? | Dog Spies, Scientific American Blog Network | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Where I live, in America, it's taken for granted that responsible owners spay or neuter their dogs. The population of homeless animals is still large enough ...
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Learning and the Brain: Resource Roundup

Learning and the Brain: Resource Roundup | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Browse a list of resources, articles, videos, and links for exploring the connection between education and neuroscience
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UBC sex assault reports out of sync with police statistics

UBC sex assault reports out of sync with police statistics | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
The number of sexual assault reports received by the University of British Columbia between 2009 and 2013 is less than a quarter of the number received by the RCMP detachment on the UBC campus during the same time period, a CBC News investigation has learned.

The revelation raises questions about why UBC’s published data is out of sync with the RCMP’s figures.

As part of an investigation of sexual assault reporting on Canadian campuses, CBC News contacted 87 university and major colleges across Canada over the past six months, and requested the number of sexual assaults reported on each campus between 2009 and 2013.

Seventy-seven schools provided a complete set of data.

Campus sexual assaults study methodology
Interactive: Campus sexual assault reports
University statements on CBC's campus sexual assault survey
In its response to the CBC News survey, UBC said 16 students reported a sexual assault to the university between 2009 and 2013.

However, data obtained by CBC News from the RCMP detachment on the UBC campus, through access to information, shows more than 70 reports of sexual assault on the campus during the same time period.
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100 Paralyzed Children in US afflicted with "mysterious, sudden paralysis" - cause still undetermined

100 Paralyzed Children in US afflicted with "mysterious, sudden paralysis" - cause still undetermined | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Scientists thought a rare respiratory virus was what caused dozens of kids to lose feeling in their limbs last fall, but now the connection is less certain.
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How Languages and Genes Evolve Together

How Languages and Genes Evolve Together | critical reasoning | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that geography makes us who we are—genetically and linguistically.
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