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An issue open for discussion-ELIGILBILITY FOR EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES REGULATION

I was wondering is this policy reasonable for all students:

 

ELIGILBILITY FOR EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES REGULATION

GOALS and PRINCIPLES of BOARD POLICY on ELIGIBIITY

I. The Board of Education has the authority to establish reasonable standards and eligibility requirements as prerequisites for eligibility for co-curricular, extracurricular and interscholastic athletic activities. These standards apply to entry qualifications as well as to continued participation in such activities.

Eligibility requirements include academic standards, behavioral standards, and training standards that are to be met by all students participating in extracurricular activities, including athletics. These requirements are to be applied equally to all student participants.

 

The Board is committed to promoting academic achievement for all students and motivating students to achieve to their highest potential. In recognition of the high cost and impact of dropping out of school on the student drop-out, the student's family, and the greater community, the Board is further committed to promoting the highest level of student retention and graduation possible academic achievement for all students. Accordingly the Board is committed to eligibility standards for extracurricular activities, including athletics that promote and support academic success student retention leading to graduation. It is the Board's expectation and directive that the RCSD in the administration of these eligibility requirements will implement them only in a manner to advance the BOE's stated commitment to always promoting academic achievement for all students.

 

REGULATIONS

II. Students participating in all extracurricular activities except those that are required to obtain class credit, to remain fully eligible for participation in extracurricular activities shall be subject to the following eligibility requirements:

 

A. Students shall maintain a cumulative "C" or 2.0 average for all scheduled subjects, maintain a 93 percent daily in-class attendance and demonstrate good school citizenship.

 

B. However, a student who is participating in extracurricular activities including interscholastic athletics, maintains a 93 percent daily in-class attendance record, and demonstrates good school citizenship, but does not maintain a "C" average for all core course subjects (English, Math, Science, Social Studies, and Foreign Language) that are required for graduation shall be placed on probation until either the following a progress report or the posting of grades for the next established marking period. During the probationary period, the school attended by the student, must provide opportunities for the student to receive additional academic assistance and or tutoring. A student on probation participating in extracurricular activities other than interscholastic sports who fails to regain a "C" average may be allowed by the school Principal to remain on probationary eligibility if the Principal in consultation with a student's teachers and guidance counselor concludes sufficient academic progress is being made and the other requirements for eligibility continue to be met.

 

C. A student participating in interscholastic athletics who maintains a ninety percent (93%) daily in-class attendance record during the previous marking period, demonstrates good school citizenship, but does not meet the 2.0 Grade Point Average (G. P. A.) shall be placed on probationary eligibility during the next established marking period and be required to maintain all other eligibility requirements including:

attended mandatory tutoring arranged for by the school the student attendsor other tutoring or instructional support provided by the district or via supplemental educational service providersa weekly progress report completed by the core subject teachers (utilizing District technology). This is required only for core subjects the student is failing. The weekly progress reports are to be electronically transmitted to the coach, counselor, and athletic director documenting:

1) Daily attendance

2) No tardiness

3) Completion of all homework and class assignments

4) Academic Progress

5) Attendance at mandatory study halls and/or tutoring sessions.

6) No discipline referrals.

 

It will be the responsibility of the coach of the specific sport in which the student is participating, the student's guidance counselor and teacher(s), school's athletic director, and the building principal’s responsibility or his/her designee to monitor the student's academic progress and compliance with this policy. If a student fails to meet any of the above criteria, the student may practice or attend the team meetings but will not be allowed to participate in that week's sporting event(s) unless it has been determined by the school’s building principal or his/her designee, the athletic director, guidance counselor, and coach that sufficient effort is being made. This last provision does not apply however to illegal class absences, unexcused tardiness, disciplinary referral, characteristics of poor citizenship, or unsatisfactory participation in an after-school study program.

 

A student on probation at the end of one interscholastic sport season and who then selects to play another interscholastic sport will remain on probation in that sport until the end of the established marking period in which the new sport begins.

For a student to be eligible to play fall sport, the student will need to have met the requirements of this policy during the final established marking period of the previous school year or final GPA for the year, and failure to do so shall result in the student being required to attend a designated district sponsored summer program, in order to take part in fall sports at the beginning of the year, under the probationary terms indicated in this policy. The student must also maintain attendance in classes and any ongoing study program, and good citizenship.

 

In addition to the above, to remain eligible for extracurricular activities including interscholastic athletics, students must conformed to the established behavior standards as defined in RCSD Code of Conduct and relevant administrative regulations and guidelines. Behavioral standards include a ban on consumption/use of

alcoholic beverages, drugs and/or tobacco products. These standards extend to student conduct off school grounds, including student attendance at parties off school grounds where alcohol and/or illegal drugs are present.

 

E. In addition to the section D, to remain eligible for interscholastic athletics students must conform to the established training rules for the sport in which they are participating. "Training rules" are generally accepted as a condition of participation in student athletics, and include such requirements as attendance at practices and participation in individual training programs.

 

F. The Code of Conduct specifically outlines the penalties associated with suspensions depending upon the infraction and should be followed as a guideline to determining eligibility, An appeal regarding a student’s eligibility status based on extenuating circumstances will remain within the province of the building principal or his/her designee. A suspension from participation in an extracurricular activity does not require a full hearing pursuant to Section 3214 of the Education Law. However, a student must be given the opportunity to appear informally before the disciplinarian and/or disciplinary committee, and present his/her side of the story as part of a general discussion of the conduct under review.

 

All students participating in extracurricular activities including athletics shall be informed that they have the obligation to act in a responsible manner because of the leadership roles they play in the school environment.

 

Advisors/Coaches must disseminate a copy of the expected standards of conduct and eligibility requirements as specified in this regulation and any administrative guidelines to all students and parents at the start of each school year and interscholastic sport season, and participating students should be individually informed of the application and scope of such standards. In addition, advisors, coaches, guidance counselors, teachers, and the relevant school administrators must further provide opportunities for students failing to meet academic eligibility to receive additional academic assistance through in-school or after-school tutoring programs, or academic interventions services provided by the RCSD or mandated by No Child Left Behind.

 

Rulemaking Authority

The superintendent is charged with the authority to develop administrative regulations necessary to implement the above Board policy and regulations.

 

Effective Date

This policy and regulations shall go into effect immediately upon Board of Education adoption.

 

 

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opinions about grading system

Pass/Fail Grading system

 

According to Virtual Mentor, a publication of the American Medical Association Journal of Ethics, a pass/fail grading system has several advantages. First, students don't have to worry about their grades, because most students will pass. Students can concentrate on learning. Next, eliminating letter grades eliminates competition among students for grades. Finally, for graduate students, letter grades may be more of a reflection of the quality of a student's undergraduate or high school education than a reflection of the student's effort, ability and potential. Some schools are better than others at preparing students to succeed on the next level.

 

On the other hand, a pass/fail grading system also has its disadvantages. Students who exert extraordinary effort and achieve extraordinary results get the same grade as someone who barely scraped by, so what will motivate those students to do their best? Another concern with the pass/fail system is that it may not serve students who are struggling at the low end of the pass range. In a traditional grading system, those students may be identified and offered help.

 

Traditional grading system

 

Traditional grading systems often assign the letter grades (A-F) that most Americans are familiar with. These are sometimes tied to “points” that are used to compute grade point averages, where, for example, A=4.0, B=3.0, and so on. There are two main types of traditional grading systems: norm-referenced and criterion-referenced. A norm-referenced system assigns grades based on where students place in the class. As are assigned to the top portion of the class, Bs to the next group, Cs to the next and so on. A percentage of the class is used for each grade. For example, As may be assigned to the top 10% of the class, Bs to the next 20%, and so on. In this system, even if all students do very well and have a small difference in their overall performance, some may end up with low grades. However, it does well to show how students compare to their peers.

 

A criterion-based system, on the other hand, relates grades to a fixed performance level. For example, in this system, and A may be assigned to any student who earns 90% of possible points in the class, a B may go to anyone between 80% and 89%, and so on. This allows students to earn expected grades based on their performance independent of other students. However, differences in the harshness of grading may force all students to high or low grades, so the distribution of scores may be quite small.

 

Traditional and alternative grading systems both have their benefits and drawbacks. The widely-understood meaning of traditional grading is an advantage, and many institutions require students to submit grades in this format. However, alternative schemes provide opportunities for more subjective or detailed evaluation, sometimes changing the role of the instructor. Research continues into these systems and their use in different environments.

 

Reference

http://www.educatoral.com/wordpress/2011/12/21/comparing-traditional-and-alternative-grading-schemes/

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Negative Effects of Computers in Classrooms-By Jessy Norman

Computers and other related technologies have become an enormous part of our daily lives. They have altered our sense of people, space, and time. From our living rooms, we can now talk to people, and watch ev ents unfold in far-off places. Shopping, banking, and game playing are just a few of the other daily activities that have also changed. So many aspects of the ways we communicate and handle information have been altered by technological development. Cellu l ar phones, answering machines, voice mail, fax machines, cable televisions, computer networks, satellite communications and e-mail are only some recent changes. Other manifestations of this change would be the location of where it is happening. Yes, it is everywhere, including the classrooms for the use of educating children.Technology is now becoming more popular in the presence of classrooms all around the world. Tomorrow's future is in the hands of today's students. So having computer technology in the classroom sounds like a good idea to me. As time goes by, these machines are being produced to compute at a faster rate, for a cheaper cost. These are the known facts. But, who funds these machines going into the classrooms for the children to learn? Are these computers really necessary? Who already has the education to teach others about this subject, and will that just cost more money? Are they efficient, and really worth it? What are some of the causes and effects of these machines?

 

Today, major compa nies are working with educators to support the use of new technology in the classroom. This includes laptops in the rooms for students also. School districts across the country, about seventy of them, are working with The Microsoft Corporation to create w h at they call a "Connected Learning Community". Together, Microsoft and the schools have developed the "Anytime, Anywhere Learning" program whose goal is for all students to have their own portable computer and to use these tools like pencils and paper. According to the program's promoters, the idea is to enable students to produce the work that would be acceptable in classrooms around the world (The Education Digest- pg58).

 

The program also gives teachers access to the Internet, they can talk with other t e achers and put technology into the curriculum anytime, anywhere. Teachers in this program have stated that students are not just learning better and faster: they are also learning and doing things that were impossible without the new technology(59). The program is said to have boosted the students' problem-solving skills and intellectual autonomy. The mechanical processes of typing and retyping have been minimized; it is reported that these students can spend more time now on other things in the classrooms. Wendy Schwartz states three main reasons that computers should be a significant part of a students education (1)computer can make learning all subjects easier, and they are especially valuable in developing students' language and problem-solving skills( 2 ) Students can use computers to reach hundreds of telecommunications networks, these sources provide a huge amount of information that students cannot get from textbook and more traditional learning tools(3) Computer literacy, understanding computers tech n ology, is necessary for most good-paying and interesting careers(60). But there is also a downside, In contrast, the Atlantic Monthly published a cover story on the matter. Todd Oppenheimer stated that, for many decades, technology has challenged the way students are taught. Such influential people as inventor Thomas Edison, educator William Levenson and behavioral psychologist B.F. Skinner proclaimed that new technology devices of their era would vastly increase student's interests in learning. In 1922, E dison predicted that the motion picture would replace textbooks in the classroom. In 1945, Levenson, director of the Cleveland public schools' radio stations, predicted that the radio receiver would be as common in classrooms as the blackboard. . In the e arly 1960s Skinner said that teaching machines and programmed instruction would increase student learning.

 

Those first-generation Apples and PC's often sat collecting dust in classroom corners, largely because teachers had little time or resources to learn more about them, even if they had the inclination. So, with more computers in classrooms now then ever, why is it that schools are not producing millions of Bill Gates clones? It seems that they have rushed this computers in with out having one k e y element-- training the teachers. Education Week Magazine has just completed a report on technology in school that shows teachers do not know what to do with all that RAM. Almost 50% don't use computers at all in teaching, and only 16 percent use the I nternet. The Educational software that's out there doesn't provide much promise:70% of high school teachers said finding useful products is nearly impossible (Teachers are Lagging off on Logging on).

 

Today, however schools and teacher education programs a re having to assist teachers in learning the technology skills they need in order to prepare for life in the future. The use of computer technology and the growing access to educational resources through the Internet are requiring educators to rethink ho w they teach and to help students to prepare for work in upcoming decades. Most teachers, though are not adequately prepared yet to make use of exciting new educational technologies because neither their teacher education programs nor their schools have provided sufficient time or incentives for them to learn.

 

Such advancement in today's technology has allowed now for students to learn from computers inside and also outside of the classroom. Distant learning has become popular throughout the world, allo wing more students to be educated with out even leaving the home. Technologies, such as satellite video conferences , Internet- based teleconferencing , and interactive multimedia classrooms, are giving schools the ability to reach and educate nontradit i onal students in numbers that will expand with American higher education. Giving another plus to why technology is so important and must be spread everywhere, including into schools. However, the problem being in the hands of the educator, entailing kno wledge of these subjects to be learned.

Although, doing so for these districts is not as easy as it sounds. A challenge in American schools has been the in-service training for teachers in any subject, Unlike college professors,primary and secondary teac hers have little available time during the workday for practicing technology. While children are in class, teachers spend their time teaching and supervising them. At the end of the day, few have the energy to attend workshops. Trying to get them to gi ve up a Saturday is even more of a struggle.(The Future of Technology in Teaching).

 

The educating of these professionals may be a large obstacle to overcome. However, there is still the funding for schools to keep up with the pace of technological change s. Until school boards and administrations begin to budget adequately for technology's equipment and ongoing staff development, educators will still be losing the battle. Most schools, including colleges and universities, do not have budget models yet t h at take into account equipment and software upgrades that have become routine in most business environment. School boards should be seeking the aid of local corporate leaders to help their administrators learn the ropes of budget for technology needs. ( The Future of Technology in Teaching). Although if they do find the money, how beneficial will it be? \par \tab This year, American schools will invest $5.2 billion in technology, out pacing last years $4.3 billion. Politicians, business leaders and educators cl amor to get the latest hardware into every school. Ten years ago there was one computer for every 37 students, now there is one for every seven, and 70% of American schools are on-line.(The Great Technology Mania). The nations that regularly leave us in the dust on academic tests, like Korea, have focused on good teaching, not in technology . There is no evidence that use of computers or the Internet improves student achievement. Yet the billions spent on technology represents money not spent on music, art, libraries, maintenance, and other essential functions.(The Great Technology Mania)

 

So, does this all make sense? A high school teacher interviewed by the Los Angeles Times, said that students' favorite sites on the Internet were about cars, sports, and movies. The New York Times identified dozens of Internet sites that sell term papers. One student of a New York City high school said "A lot of people download papers and just change the names. There aren't a lot of original papers that get writte n anymore".

It can be argued that Internet learning is fun for students, helping them to learn. Astrophysicist Clifford Stoll responds: " Most learning isn't fun. Learning takes work. Discipline. Responsibility. " He would rather see a youngster lea rn "how Shakespeare processed words than how Microsoft does." ( The Great Technology Mania.) Clifford Stoll loves computers. Even though he does not want kids anywhere near them, at least not in the classroom. In " High Tech Heretic" (Doubleday) Stol l writes that he'd "rather see a child push a pencil or a high schooler do a chemistry lab than tackle a similar tackel the virtual way." His reasoning is, Students will be actively thinking about the task at hand. As Stoll argues, kids will always figu re out computers, as they should \par \tab There are many uses for these tools. But since teachers lack the knowledge needed, students may get stuck doing meaningless exercises. Apparently, these machines can become a waste of time, if not in the hands of the right user. This time could be spent doing more educational things. Maybe even trying to catch up to those countries ahead of us.

 

In conclusion, teachers are lacking the knowledge to log -on to this new advancement, making this learning experience usel ess to students. There is the smallest student to computer ratio ever, and little is being done about this. Some schools have began to educate on this new trend, having positive and negative effects to go along with it. A majority of this country has not jumped on the band-wagon due to the lack of education on the teachers' behalf. The ancient Chinese Philosopher Lao-tzu pointed out that " a journey of a thousand miles begins with one small step." Large Corporations and school districts are spending billions of dollars along this walk. Although it seems to be moving at a slow pace. Something must be done for students to be able to run into tomorrow's future.

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2. “Our society is overly materialistic. We center our lives on acquiring material things at the expense of such traditional values as family and education.”

I agree with the speaker about the opinion that “Our society is overly materialistic. We center our lives on acquiring material things at the expense of such traditional values as family and education” in that it emphasized the bad effects of being overly materialistic. It’s true that we center our lives on acquiring material things at the expense of family and education, although we are still aware of the importance of such traditional values.

With the rapid development of economics, people became richer and had more money at their disposal. Unnecessary purchasing and luxurious shopping became common among us. Materialistic desire is bulging within people’s minds. For example, one friend told me that a girl refused to marry her boyfriend just because he did not buy a big diamond ring to her. Girls are never satisfied with countless shoes, bags and fragrances in their wardrobes, instead, they shopped more and more expensive items with logos like Gucci, Channel and Lancome. Boys all are working hard just for fancy limos or expensive SUVs.

With so much time and energy put on working so that people could buy more, they have became more and more indifferent to the social and moral courtesy as well as other aspects which should be treated seriously. Families are replaced by work and education could help or hurt people when they were not taken appropriately. People are regardless of the common courtesy while they are busy making money. For example, people will spend less time with their families and care less about their children or parents; people go to college just for jobs and nothing more and this would definitely cause problems to the whole society. They do not care about the poor because people judge person based upon the advantages he/her could be taken of. The overly materialistic orientation of people to some extent does sacrifice the traditional values once were appreciated by us.

In sum, the overly materialistic orientation has lead people to a somehow unhealthy path toward their future. Families are neglected and education becomes the sole tool for jobs under the driven of economics stimulations.

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Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | DMLcentral

Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | DMLcentral | Opinion Garden for Man Yang | Scoop.it

"Critical Design Literacy

The concept is informed by design thinking, a rich and dynamic process that emphasizes inquiry, innovation, ideation, building, and problem solving. Critical design literacy applies the protocols of design thinking to practice social innovations that lead to social transformation. In the learning environments that we will pilot we want students to become literate in critical thinking and critical designing. The former encourages students to look at their community through an inquisitive lens while the latter encourages students to design for community impact.

Critical design literacy challenges some of our most ‘common sense’ notions of schooling. In general schools seek to produce good, loyal, and dutiful citizens. But what if the mission of our learning institutions is to create engaged, critical, and future-building citizens? Keri Facer reminds us that future-building schools must do more than train students to inhabit some pre-determined future. Schools should be community resources and laboratories that help students develop the competence and the experience to intervene in the making of a future that is more equitable, desirable, and sustainable.

Critical design literacy also challenges the notion that the primary role of schools is to prepare students to get jobs in the global economy. Because a majority of the students at Texas City High will not attend college there is a tremendous amount of pressure on teachers and administrators to focus on career readiness. Critical design literacy strives to do more than prepare students for participation in the economy; it strives to prepare students for participation in their community. There is something extraordinarily empowering about seeing the world through the lens of critical design, a lens that encourages students to do what designers do: develop the skills to change existing situations into preferred ones.

Additionally, critical design literacy embraces the learning and design principles of connected learning, a interdisciplinary research network that believes,”that the most meaningful and resilient forms of learning happen when a learner has a personal interest or passion that they are pursuing in a context of cultural affinity, social support, and shared purpose.”


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do we need to concern about CML under the circumstance of standardized testing?

sure.

1, CML can be transferable to enhance students' understandings.

2,CML can protect student from being unfairly judged by the mass media.

3,only do you know the motivation, reason beneth the text, can you better understand them.

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Education is about preparing young people to make the world better than it is!

Education is about preparing young people to make the world better than it is! | Opinion Garden for Man Yang | Scoop.it

his speech was really insightful.


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Free Speech of students

Free Speech of students | Opinion Garden for Man Yang | Scoop.it
The Education Rights Center at Howard University School of Law fosters educational equality and equity in public schools.
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Academics and social action

Academics and social action, an article by Brian Martin published in Higher Education Review, 1984...
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Freeland For Talking » Personal Reading

Freeland For Talking » Personal Reading | Opinion Garden for Man Yang | Scoop.it

Welcome to my edublog to see more responses to various topics! Please feel free to give any suggestions and even criticises.

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1. “Celebrities have a tremendous influence on the young, and for that reason, they have a responsibility to act as role models.” What do you think of it?

I agree with the saying that “Celebrities have a tremendous influence on the young, and for that reason, they have a responsibility to act as role models”. Celebrities have huge influences on the society because they are part of it and those influences imply responsibilities to the society which finally require the celebrities to act as role model to the young.

The influences celebrities have on the society range from fashion to politics. For example, Michael Jordan who excels at playing basketball has lead a fashion of sports wear industry; Princess Kate also impresses on people with her clothing style. There are also famous musicians who would speak out their opinions about the politics. The young always dream of being one of those celebrities when they grow up because in their eyes, being celebrities means success and power.

Due to the immense influences brought by celebrities, they doubtlessly are responsible for the healthy growth of the young. It is the society which gives celebrities status and massive attention all around the country and thus it’s their responsibilities to behave good and positive. Negative effects of behaviors of celebrities have on the young can be seen from many examples. Such as the drunk driving of Lidsay Lohan and filthy sexy video tape of Kim Kadashian. Once mislead by those inappropriate or illegal actions done by celebrities, the young will take it for granted to do things like them because the young are still in the progress of growing and they sometimes lack of a sense of right or wrong.

In conclusion, what celebrities have get from the society which include countless economic benefit as well as idolization have to be paid off by their positive doings because they are under scrunity of people. The young generation of country’s future and everyone who involves in the process of leading them to the success should take responsibility of behaving good. Celebrities will too make it accountable to act as role models.

 

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Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | DMLcentral

Why Critical Design Literacy is Needed Now More Than Ever | DMLcentral | Opinion Garden for Man Yang | Scoop.it

"Critical Design Literacy

The concept is informed by design thinking, a rich and dynamic process that emphasizes inquiry, innovation, ideation, building, and problem solving. Critical design literacy applies the protocols of design thinking to practice social innovations that lead to social transformation. In the learning environments that we will pilot we want students to become literate in critical thinking and critical designing. The former encourages students to look at their community through an inquisitive lens while the latter encourages students to design for community impact.

Critical design literacy challenges some of our most ‘common sense’ notions of schooling. In general schools seek to produce good, loyal, and dutiful citizens. But what if the mission of our learning institutions is to create engaged, critical, and future-building citizens? Keri Facer reminds us that future-building schools must do more than train students to inhabit some pre-determined future. Schools should be community resources and laboratories that help students develop the competence and the experience to intervene in the making of a future that is more equitable, desirable, and sustainable.

Critical design literacy also challenges the notion that the primary role of schools is to prepare students to get jobs in the global economy. Because a majority of the students at Texas City High will not attend college there is a tremendous amount of pressure on teachers and administrators to focus on career readiness. Critical design literacy strives to do more than prepare students for participation in the economy; it strives to prepare students for participation in their community. There is something extraordinarily empowering about seeing the world through the lens of critical design, a lens that encourages students to do what designers do: develop the skills to change existing situations into preferred ones.

Additionally, critical design literacy embraces the learning and design principles of connected learning, a interdisciplinary research network that believes,”that the most meaningful and resilient forms of learning happen when a learner has a personal interest or passion that they are pursuing in a context of cultural affinity, social support, and shared purpose.”


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differences between media literacy & critical media literacy

learn to read/learn to critique

specific kind of litreacy/pedagogy to guide students

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