Critical Conversations
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Critical Conversations
Something tells me these things are important to educators even if they are not part of the usual conversations educators have.
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Cord-Cutters Rejoice: Streaming Broadcast TV Wins Big in Court | Threat Level | Wired.com

Cord-Cutters Rejoice: Streaming Broadcast TV Wins Big in Court | Threat Level | Wired.com | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
A divided federal appeals court, ruling 2-1 Monday, declined to block a unique, antenna-based subscription service that enables the streaming of broadcast television to any internet-enabled device.
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

Copyright talks continue in multiple media. This shapes what we ach our students about what they can do, what they should do--digital citizenship.

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Mind and Cosmos: Philosopher Thomas Nagel’s Brave Critique of Scientific Reductionism

Mind and Cosmos: Philosopher Thomas Nagel’s Brave Critique of Scientific Reductionism | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
How our hunger for definitive answers robs us of the intellectual humility necessary for understanding the universe and our place in it.
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

Something to keep, er, in mind and the reason we need the liberal arts and the reason STEM is good but not good enough. 

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Through the Noise: Balance in a Digital World

Through the Noise: Balance in a Digital World | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
Photo Credit: giulia.forsythe via Compfight cc When thinking about balance in a digital world, three questions come to mind: Why is balance necessary, how do we demonstrate or measure it, and are e...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

As you say Ana, this is a journey we (in schools) have to make together with students and their families. No one really knows where all this will land and every community will have different needs so the only possible way forward is through constant dialogue with all stakeholders. At my school, we're developing that conversation arounf the Brand of Me, something I think sounds more proactive that digital footprints or tattoos; those are things you leave behind, passively. See this discussion over on Bill Ferriter's blog: http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical/2013/03/guest-post-braddo-on-digital-footprints.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+the_tempered_radical+(The+Tempered+Radical)

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 21, 2013 11:46 PM

As educators, we need to teach about digital footprints and how they can impact our lives, both online and offline. Yet, can we sometimes inadvertently condone or not condone online attitudes. For example, it  can be difficult to avoid playing into the culture of public shaming that often occurs in social media. Perhaps the public shaming of individuals who have made poor online presence choices, generating “digital tattoos” as some have coined it (prints you are stuck with), is not the best way to instill an attitude of thoughtful dialogue and respect with regard to digital citizenship. After all, if public shaming becomes the norm, will society become immune to social consequences? Additionally, some may view a tattoo as a work of art or a sign of creativity. Instead, a willingness to listen, understand, help and support may set a better example. Through listening, we can create opportunities to help each other navigate this difficult digital world (a world that will undoubtedly see us make many more mistakes). Let’s listen; together we might just find balance!

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Talk to Me: The Future of Voice | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Talk to Me: The Future of Voice | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

A collection of WIRED pieces on the future of voice interaction with our devices. This will be very disruptive to our current classroom model.

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Reselling Digital Goods Is Copyright Infringement, Judge Rules | Threat Level | Wired.com

Reselling Digital Goods Is Copyright Infringement, Judge Rules | Threat Level | Wired.com | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
A federal judge is declaring as unlawful a one-of-a-kind website enabling the online sale of pre-owned digital music files.
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

Digital is not the same as analog--the ease with which we can copy digital content makes a difference. This ruling highlights a couple places where digital touches everyday practice in our schools: in how we handle digital content, such as eBooks, and how we handle the development of digital citizenship in our students.

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Why The Human Body Will Be The Next Computer Interface

Why The Human Body Will Be The Next Computer Interface | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
By now you’ve probably heard a lot about wearables, living services, the Internet of Things, and smart materials.
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

Last yeaI at Alan November's BLC conference I gave a presentation called the Infinite:1 Program, Or Why Your 1:1 Program is Already Out of Date. I was cheekily suggesting that a 1:1 program is still a reflection of an aging industrial model of education. We need to stop thinking about devices and start thinking about schools themselves as a kind of operating system that we connect to in whatever way is convenient--through the front door or through an app. People often say to me "look Brad, people need to move forward in little steps and a 1:1 program is a necessary first step." That may be so (I am not convinced it is, however)  but even as we build the infrastructure to support a robust 1:1 program what must appreciate that the world outside of schools has already moved past that.

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Julie Lindsay's comment, March 25, 2013 11:55 PM
I think it is the teachers and leaders who are holding back ubiquitous computing. Schoosl today should provide essential infrastructure and then insist on everyone having at least one device with which to connect and share. Gone are the days when IT Departments covet humming servers and make things far too complicated for the average person to understand. Cloud computing and mobile technology and now of course moving into the body being the next interface......I say bring it on! Those schools still deciding if 1:1 is right for them (!) will hopefully get left behind in the dust.
Chris Long's comment, April 22, 2013 1:39 PM
Yes we must look at changing the culture of learning starting with the question of "what do we want our students to be able to do?" Then look at how technology can be used to support this goal. Buying a bunch of stuff and throwing it into the classroom is not a sustainable or effective approach. In this regard, I think our district (that has no 1:1) and is feeling left-behind can actually be ahead.
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Buying Our Way into Bondage: The Risks of Adaptive Learning Services - David Wiley

The Perfect Storm Much of the education technology world - and many of the foundations and venture firms that provide the funding for it - are obsessed with adaptive learning. The Gates Foundation'...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

Ana's comments are worth noting. I wonder if, as a way out of the problem, we look at the state somehow take over the delivery/ownership model. Public edcuation is done, as it is. (See my ost http://www.ovenell-carter.com/education-aint-broke-so-dont-fix-it/) It's neither sustainable nor scalable. I believe we need a whole new structure; the current new option, as described in this article, is problematic. BUt some variation might work.

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, March 22, 2013 12:08 AM

Adaptive learning services are a perfect response to the business model challenges presented by OER to publishers. While the broad availability of free content (e.g., CNN.com) and OER have trained internet users to expect content to be free, many people are still willing to pay for services. Adaptive learning systems exploit this willingness by deeply intermingling content and services so that you cannot access one with using the other. Naturally, because an adaptive learning service is comprised of content plus adaptive services, it will be more expensive than static content used to be. And because it is a service, you cannot simply purchase it like you used to buy a textbook (particularly useful for publishers given the Court’s recent decision upholding the first sale doctrine with regard to textbooks). An adaptive learning service is something you subscribe to, like Netflix. And just like with Netflix, the day you stop paying for the service is the day you lose access to the service.

Helena Capela's curator insight, March 22, 2013 7:08 AM

interesting article on the implications of openness, OER, the end of textbooks and the end of ownership if the trend is adaptive learning services

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She's Not Talking About It, But Siri Is Plotting World Domination | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

She's Not Talking About It, But Siri Is Plotting World Domination | Gadget Lab | Wired.com | Critical Conversations | Scoop.it
Apple wants to give Siri a distinct personality and AI to make interacting with her more natural, and it is capitalizing on our tendency to anthropomorphize things to remake its digital assistant.
Brad Ovenell-Carter's insight:

Mostly I find that schools, even ones with (or planning for) robust technology programs, take a narrow view of the way we interact or could interact with our technology. I suspect that is a reflection of the deep structure of schools, which is set up to control behaviour & isolate the individual. Outside of schools, we are more open-minded. There is no way current classroom design can accommodate students and teachers all talking to their devices. 

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