Criminology
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Rescooped by William Bruce Gaddis III from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Restorative justice for everyone: An innovative program and case study from Turners Falls High School in Massachusetts —

Restorative justice for everyone: An innovative program and case study from Turners Falls High School in Massachusetts — | Criminology | Scoop.it
from the article by David Bulley and Thom Osborne:

Restorative Justice generally exists as an alternative to traditional discipline. In most schools a student who acts out will be referred to the assistant principal or to the dean of students who then makes a determination: Is the student a candidate for restorative justice or should they be disciplined the traditional way of detentions or suspensions? Often this includes a choice by the student. In fact, as part of most restorative conferences, the perpetrator is informed that participation is voluntary and that at any time they can opt out and subject themselves to traditional justice. One problem with this system is that too many students welcome an out of school suspension.

Via Rob Duke
William Bruce Gaddis III's insight:

This is a great alternative for disciplinary actions within the school systems. I believe that it will illustrate to students better ways of problems solving and it would rehabilitate them in an aspect as well. Restorative Justice being use in the schools will edify the youth more so than detention and suspension can.

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Rescooped by William Bruce Gaddis III from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Kodiak police seize $2.2 million in meth, heroin

Kodiak police seize $2.2 million in meth, heroin | Criminology | Scoop.it
The Kodiak Police Department's seizure of $2.2 million in methamphetamine and heroin on Saturday was the largest drug bust in the department's history.

Via Rob Duke
William Bruce Gaddis III's insight:

This is definitely a victory for Kodiak Police Department and hopefully its the precursor for the decline of distribution of illegal substances in the Kodiak area.

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Sawyer Skiba's comment, April 22, 2014 9:18 PM
It must suck to be this drug dealer. 2.2 million dollars is an incredible amount. I know that drugs are in Alaska, but i did not realize that it was enough of an industry to require these large amounts. It is amazing how something can be such a big deal in a state and town, and yet the people in these areas are in the dark about the problem. I have been to Kodiak multiple times and never got the feeling that it was a drug town. This just goes to show that major crime is everywhere and is occuring in our own back yards.
Colby Wallace's comment, April 27, 2014 4:00 PM
For a small town of Kodiak Alaska that is a pretty big bust. Having that amount of methamphetamine makes me think that there must be someone close by making the stuff. Shipping 25 ounces of meth up to Alaska sounds very hard. I did not realize that drug use and abuse was such a wide scale thing in Kodiak.
Austin Cullen Rogers's curator insight, April 27, 2014 8:19 PM

Drugs can show up at any corner of the earth extremely easily. There is no place on Earth where drug addiction isn't a problem because drugs are everywhere. And once the police think they've found the main producer for all the illegal drugs, the next guy steps up and starts where the other guy left off.

Rescooped by William Bruce Gaddis III from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Wrangle Over Oklahoma Executions Bounces From Court to Court

Wrangle Over Oklahoma Executions Bounces From Court to Court | Criminology | Scoop.it
After a successful challenge of the legality of Oklahoma’s secrecy in obtaining lethal drugs, no one has granted a stay of execution to two men as the state’s top two courts both have declared, repeatedly, that only the other can do so.

Via Rob Duke
William Bruce Gaddis III's insight:

when it comes to the death penalty I agree with it being swift and painless, but however using it as a ploy to hinder the execution is pitiful. I also believe that the lethal combination should be disclosed and FDA approved.

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