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Winslow Township police officer charged with shooting his own patrol car

Winslow Township police officer charged with shooting his own patrol car | Criminology | Scoop.it

 Da'Shaun Carr, 23, of Clayton, charged with false public alarm in alleged incident.


Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

As I was reading this, all that I could really do is laugh. For the simple fact of why would you do something like this? There was not a great deal of information that came along with this article, but from what I read, the officers’ actions were pointless and his motives and reasoning were not mentioned. This is something that has to be embarrassing for Carr, but without knowing his intentions as to why he would shoot his own car and call for help its hard to make or pass judgment on the incident. 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, November 22, 2014 12:09 AM

Perhaps a Munchausin by Officer incident?

Ricky Osborne's comment, November 22, 2014 12:56 AM
What was the point of shooting his own vehicle? This officer did not thoroughly plan out this false shooting report. He should have known the exact procedures that would take place after he shot his patrol car being that he himself is an officer. This guys should be embarrassed and removed from his position as a law enforcement officer for breaking the law in a deceitful manner. I guess everyone is innocent until proven guilty in the court of law.
Amanda McColley's comment, November 30, 2014 4:04 PM
There is such little information in this article! Has he said his reason for doing it? I wonder if he had planned on pinning it on someone else? Or maybe he really shouldn't have passed the psych eval when he became a cop. That is so bizarre that he did this, and the fact they said he did it with a personal weapon. Why does a cop carry his personal gun with him while on duty? Who knows though, maybe once more information is released there could have been a reason this all happened.
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It’s not just Ferguson: US cops who kill are rarely indicted

Why is police misconduct so poorly recorded?

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

This is a topic that really rubbed me the wrong way. Not only the fact that I am a African American man, but the fact that this seems to be the new trend when it come to police shooting young men of the African American community. Do to the fact that something similar just happened to Trayvon Martin, and then now this is mind-blowing to me. Of course I was not there and do not know exactly what happen between the two men, but I do not believe that there is any excuse to have to shoot an unarmed man to death. There is nothing that I can think of that will ever justify that. Especially taking into consideration how old Mike Brown was. Now on top of that there is no criminal action tat is being taking place to have the officer serve time for his crime is horrible. Now there’s a family out there that just lost their baby boy and there is no justice being served for them, which I couldn’t even imagine going through. Based on everything that has been going on lately with the justice system and letting all these cops get off with no consequence is definitely something that needs to change. They are held to a higher standard in the community and should know how to handle situations in ways that don’t end lives. 

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Two shot by Columbus police officer as his hand is pinned in door

Two shot by Columbus police officer as his hand is pinned in door | Criminology | Scoop.it
Two people were shot yesterday afternoon by a Columbus police officer who opened fire after a door was slammed on his hand at a South Side home. Brian Bates, 44, was charged tonight with felony assault on a police officer, whose name hasn’t yet been released. Police say that Bates pinned the officer’s hand in the door. Police haven’t yet released the name of the 23-year-old woman who also was shot. She was not charged.

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

I definitely do not like situation such as this one. When it comes to my point of view of the situation, I definitely do agree that the cop was in a vulnerable situation to the point where firing his gun was necessary because you never know what is on the other side of the door, and also based on the actions of the man who slammed the officers hand in the door. The only thing that caught my eye in the situation was the fact that there was nine bullets found in the house from the gun. Taking into consideration that I was not in the situation and have no idea how I would react, it is hard for me to come to a conclusion if that is excessive shooting. Based on what I know I do believe that the officer was in a position to shoot to kill and that may not have been his motive, but at the same time he was most likely shooting until his hand was released, which I can understand, especially if the officer had to go to the hospital to check if he had a broken hand. I do feel bad for the woman that was shot by the stray bullet just do to being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Although she might have been the lady, that the police were flagged down about, she still did not deserve to get shot. At the end of the day I’m just happy that everyone is okay.

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Brittany Stahle's comment, November 12, 2014 1:04 AM
I do not think the officer was at fault at all, he was in a vulnerable state where his hand was pinned in the door and being held there by a gentlemen on the other side of the door. The officer took matters into his own hand and shot bullets through the door to try to release his hand, not knowing what was happening on the other side. It is scary to imagine what the people inside could be doing, and so he did what he had to do.
Brandon Jensen's comment, November 12, 2014 8:39 PM
I agree that the officer shouldn't be at fault for what had happened. It could have very well been a dangerous situation if things had escalated any more than they had. The officer said to let his hand go multiple times with no response or action taken to release his hand so he acted as he saw fit for the situation.
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School to Prison Pipeline Slowed in Los Angeles

School to Prison Pipeline Slowed in Los Angeles | Criminology | Scoop.it
The “school to prison” practices that have become so common place in disciplinary practices in schools all across America are about to end in school districts in Los Angeles.

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

I definitely think that this is a great idea for the simple fact that it wont portray a child’s image early in their life as someone negative. We are all human and we all make mistakes, and hopefully this changes the future mistakes in a child’s near future. The way I can see this back firing is that kids will end up committing more low offense crimes without the fear of the law. That is my only knock on this issue, but my personal opinion is that low offense crimes shouldn’t send children to courthouses anyway unless it is a continuous thing. There are many pros and cons that come along with the “school to prison” practice, but there’s nothing wrong with giving it a shot to lower it and seeing where it goes from there. Hopefully it works out for the better. 

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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, September 23, 2014 2:17 AM
I think this is a positive direction to go with dealing with youth. However will the school be able to handle the influx of cases that will be directed towards the counselors? They are also trying to take a stance on just suspending kids from school which is great, because this is not a solution to the problem. Making kids not be able to attend school when they are already at risk, causes more harm then good. It would be interesting if they really follow the changes and show how not putting the kids into the justice system can help prevent them from being in it as adults.

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NYPD Chief of Department skips out on 9/11 ceremony

NYPD Chief of Department  skips out on 9/11 ceremony | Criminology | Scoop.it
Going on vacation was apparently more important to the NYPD’s highest-ranking uniformed officer than attending this year’s 9/11 ceremony at Ground Zero, where 23 of his brother officers perished, s...

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

After reading this article and understanding the importance of the day, I do not believe that it was okay for him to miss the ceremony taking into consideration his rank as a officer and the what he stands for. Although there were comments that supported each side of the argument, I think it was not a good thing for him to miss out on the ceremony. It’s an important day that I know he did not forget about. Therefore there is no excuse for missing it beside a family emergency, but that definitely was not the case. 

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Melia Markell's comment, September 25, 2014 2:29 AM
I am not excusing the chief or saying that he should not have any moral conflict about taking a vacation. However, some people do handle their mourning or sadness in different ways. The chief should have been there as a symbolic management figure, yes. However it is not fair to say that he simply didn't care or that he doesn't respect all those that lost their lives. The article does not discuss in any way what type of vacation this way. The term vacation can be used loosely and doesn't always necessarily mean just some "on the whim" trip that he took. It may have been something that was planned far in advance and they may have to work around the another spouses or children's schedule. I agree with the unnamed NYPD boss that stated that it was petty to criticize someone who is entitled, like he said, to take a vacation.
Brandon Jensen's comment, September 25, 2014 4:41 AM
Agreeing with many of the other comments, 9/11 is a pretty well known date for our country and he should have taken that into account when planning his vacation, or at least pushed it back so those dates did not cross. It seems kind of sad that he would miss it being such a high ranking officer and having lost other officers on that day. I could understand missing it for something else if it were pretty important, but for a vacation? nah.
Rob Duke's comment, September 25, 2014 2:01 PM
Melia, you do make an important point about people grieving in different ways. PTSD is marked now through some studies to test avoidance. Essentially, what is done is to show military recruits scenes of warfare and record eye movements toward and away from different scenes. As you can imagine, young recruits who have self-selected for military service most often move their eyes towards the "cool" action shots. However, many returning vets, avoid those scenes with their eyes, and it ends up higher percentages of those who avoid the scenes, have PTSD. Not surprisingly, there are much higher rates of suicides within the ranks of eye avoiders (however the researchers caution that 89% of the eye avoiders have no serious problems adapting). Here's a link on the subject: http://www.cbc.ca/player/AudioMobile/Day%2B6/ID/2443515202/
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Ferguson officer Darren Wilson in talks to resign from police force, sources say

Ferguson officer Darren Wilson in talks to resign from police force, sources say | Criminology | Scoop.it
Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed Michael Brown, is in the final stages of negotiations with city officials to resign, sources say.

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

After reading this article, I do not believe that there is any type of remorse for his actions at all. I don’t expect him to just have a sob story and apologize to the family every chance he gets, but for him to truly believe that he did nothing wrong is a little obscured. He took the life of a young man that was unarmed and as a trained police officer; I know that he did not have to shoot to kill Mike Brown. Looking at the fact that he would want to resign for the safety of the his fellow officers does make sense, but at this point I d not think it makes a difference if you look at all the horrible actions taking place by the people of Fergusson. 

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LAPD Selects Taser for Body Cameras | KFI AM 640

LAPD Selects Taser for Body Cameras | KFI AM 640 | Criminology | Scoop.it
The Los Angeles Police Department said Tuesday it ha selected Taser International to supply body-worn cameras for officers, following a months long field evaluation of several models from different manufacturers.

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

This topic was a bit interesting to me and I wish that there were a little more detail. I personally believe that this will be a good idea, just to monitor the use of the Taser and to also protect an officer in regards to be accused of using the Taser for an unnecessary reason. Also to protect the people who actually do get tased when its not a valid reason nor situation to. I am a big fan of cameras when it comes to anything having to do with the justice system, because people tend to lie at times, but cameras never do. 

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Marijuana milestone

Marijuana milestone | Criminology | Scoop.it
BESIDES choosing lawmakers, on November 4th voters in three American states and the District of Columbia considered measures to liberalise the cannabis trade. Alaska...

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

Not coming from a bias standpoint at all but I do not see the problem that marijuana can have, that would stand as something that is worst than alcohol. Therefore I do not see the problem with legalizing marijuana. There are much more things going on in the world that is way more important to focus on. Along side of that, do to the fact that marijuana is so popular in the world today, it is not a drug that is hard to come across and partake in using regardless if it were legal or not. In other cases I do although I do feel as if there are people that would benefit from legalization based on their medical history and the fact that it is a drug that can be beneficial in curing what even the medical problem is with a certain individual. Referring to my person experience and upbringing, there have been plenty of times when I was in high school in which that marijuana was presented to me. I personally do not smoke, but I do have friends that are heavy smokers and it was no problem for them to get their hands on marijuana at any moment. I say this because like I stated above whether it is legal or not, it is going to be used by those who have a habit or just feel like partaking in smoking weed. 

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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 15, 2014 3:19 AM
Its interesting to follow the changing laws state to state. Until the Federal government changes the classification of Marijuana it still wont change too much. I have already received the “notifications” and reminders stating federal law trumps state law and for those involved with the federal government it is still against the law to have anything to do with Marijuana. Opinions have changed, but than again you have a city in MA who is trying to make smoking anything in general banned. There are still companies who are against the legalization because they don't want it to affect their company. Fear of industrial Hemp,Hemp would be an ideal source of biomass for fuel, and hemp Ethanol burns very cleanly. Also pharmaceutical companies would rather have you take a pain pill which you become addicted to, than use medical marijuana for cancer pain treatment. I wonder what big changes will be in the next five years time.
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Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem

Blacks Don’t Have a Corporal Punishment Problem | Criminology | Scoop.it
“While 70 percent of Americans approve of corporal punishment,” wrote sociologist Michael Eric Dyson for the New York Times on Wednesday, “black Americans have a distinct history with the subject. Beating children has been a depressingly familiar habit in black families since our arrival in the New World.” Dyson was...

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

Taking into consideration that growing up his was something I see as a normal form of discipline, I do not see the big issue with this problem, unless it is taken over board. I hate the term “beating” because it sounds as if it is something that different than a spanking. I do not understand why this had to be an issue of race as well. There are plenty of different racial groups that go about disciplining in this fashion. 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, September 21, 2014 1:48 AM

For an excellent discussion of the "ghetto" behaviors as a legacy of slavery and not inherent Black culture, see Thomas Sowell's "Black Rednecks: White Liberals.  Sowell is another Hoover fellow who served with McNamara who I mentioned yesterday.  Sowell also wrote the quintessential book on Marx: Marxism: Philosophy and Economics.

Jonathan Reed's comment, September 23, 2014 11:24 PM
This article speaks directly to the assumptions that society as fashioned and hand feed to populace ideology. Let’s make clear that prejudice is an inherent human response, being that we all make assumptions of the present from previous experience or ideas of what it may seem like, but with that being said does that mean that we shouldn’t examine our first thoughts and look for deeper meaning within our inner beliefs. The article said it best, “the most nebulous of facts and inferences”, is that not all prejudice is? And again, “I don’t know if there’s a solution here, or if one is even possible. The idea of black pathology is embedded in our public discourse and national psyche.” What is true and evident, is the acts committed lately by police officers on and unreported by the news. Corporal punishment has been a part of black culture throughout history but when you step back and look at the issue as a whole all ethnicities and races fall within the same category of disciplining children, either by physical abuse (whooping) or psychological abuse (time out). Too much of either is an issue, so why is it headlined as a BLACK epidemic, regardless of context, when the real issue is that we all need to figure out ways that best discipline our children. Could the answer be that we seek to point blame and instead of solving the problem stress labels and create scapegoats?
Clay Faris's comment, October 3, 2014 5:55 PM
I was spanked growing up. Spanked, not beaten. There's a difference between these two things, and the media today seem unable to make the distinction. Corporal punishment was alive and well all through my high school years in Texas......you got into trouble in school & got detention, you went down to the vice principal's office & got your 3 licks.....because God help you if you missed football practice or baseball practice because of after-school detention. I just don't see what the giant issue is here. Spanking shouldn't be the first option for every child offense, but neither should it be vilified as it is being currently. It has a place, like all things.
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Lawsuit Details How OK Trooper Turned Traffic Stop into Abduction and Brutal Rape

Lawsuit Details How OK Trooper Turned Traffic Stop into Abduction and Brutal Rape | Criminology | Scoop.it
When he began asking inappropriate sexual questions, the woman “began to fear for her safety."

Via Rob Duke
Rashaad's insight:

When it comes to this topic and issue, I first off would to comment that this is not right by any stretch of the imagination. Especially, the fact that he is an officer and is held to a higher standard than the average individual.  I am definitely somewhat confused about the situation because to my knowledge I thought that police cars are closely monitored and on the other hand I don’t understand why her friend didn’t see that what was going on was not right. At the same time I was not there in the situation so I don’t exactly know the officers body language or how he was conducting his self throughout the whole situation. I just ultimately feel really bad for the victim and I hope justice gets served for the actions taken place by the officer. 

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Rob Duke's curator insight, August 15, 2014 11:40 AM

Do psych exams with psychiatrists that specialize in police.  Take their advice and never hire the candidates who they mark as marginal (e.g. narcicists, rigid, etc.).  The "A" candidates rarely cause problems while the marginal ones usually come back to haunt agencies and the chiefs that hire them.