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Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Kodiak police seize $2.2 million in meth, heroin

Kodiak police seize $2.2 million in meth, heroin | Criminology | Scoop.it
The Kodiak Police Department's seizure of $2.2 million in methamphetamine and heroin on Saturday was the largest drug bust in the department's history.

Via Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

Drugs can show up at any corner of the earth extremely easily. There is no place on Earth where drug addiction isn't a problem because drugs are everywhere. And once the police think they've found the main producer for all the illegal drugs, the next guy steps up and starts where the other guy left off.

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William Bruce Gaddis III's curator insight, April 22, 2014 12:38 AM

This is definitely a victory for Kodiak Police Department and hopefully its the precursor for the decline of distribution of illegal substances in the Kodiak area.

Sawyer Skiba's comment, April 22, 2014 9:18 PM
It must suck to be this drug dealer. 2.2 million dollars is an incredible amount. I know that drugs are in Alaska, but i did not realize that it was enough of an industry to require these large amounts. It is amazing how something can be such a big deal in a state and town, and yet the people in these areas are in the dark about the problem. I have been to Kodiak multiple times and never got the feeling that it was a drug town. This just goes to show that major crime is everywhere and is occuring in our own back yards.
Colby Wallace's comment, April 27, 2014 4:00 PM
For a small town of Kodiak Alaska that is a pretty big bust. Having that amount of methamphetamine makes me think that there must be someone close by making the stuff. Shipping 25 ounces of meth up to Alaska sounds very hard. I did not realize that drug use and abuse was such a wide scale thing in Kodiak.
Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Police: Parents overdosed on heroin at McDonald's

Police: Parents overdosed on heroin at McDonald's | Criminology | Scoop.it
CINCINNATI — Police say two parents were found unresponsive from overdosing on heroin with their two young children at a McDonald's play yard.

Via Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

Parenting is something that not everyone is fit for, especially if you're a heroin addict. Honestly, I don't care if someone shoots up on heroin as long as they keep to themselves and don't hurt anyone else. In this case these heroin addicts hurt their children and put them in a rather dangerous situation. Who knows how many times these children have seen their parents shoot up, they probably know how to do it themselves. Overall the moral of the story is that hardcore drugs and children don't mix.

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Colby Wallace's comment, March 16, 2014 2:51 PM
I would charge these two to highest extents of the law. The fact that they did not know their limit or choose to push it shows that they have no regard to the safety of their children. These people are not fit to be parents.
Shasta Pomeroy's comment, March 16, 2014 9:20 PM
This is a very sad case. Though the children are supposed to be distanced from the father Robert Paul Palmer, and at first this would seem beneficial, it will be hard on the children. When children are distanced from their parents, it causes emotional upheaval and stress on the children. The parents are being held accountable for their actions, but I hope that the children are able to be well taken care of during this difficult time for them.
Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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The closure of the Silk Road: what has this meant for online drug trading? (Aus)

The FBI seizure and closure of the Silk Road has sparked a proliferation of users migrating to alternate dark web market-places to continue trade of illicit substances. The present editorial seeks to quantify the increase in retailers and explore the implications of this migration.


Via ReGenUC, Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

This is just one of the countless examples that the War on Drugs is a complete failure. In fact, there are many studies that suggest that it's easier for kids to get pot than to get alcohol because dealers don't care how old their customer is. This is actually one of the many reasons why I believe that Alaska has no choice but to legalize marijuana in August. It would help the economy and would lower the prison population and spending dramatically. All in all, drugs are never going to disappear and people need to learn to understand that.

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ReGenUC's curator insight, March 13, 2014 7:15 PM

Research from NDARC.

Andrew Kelly's comment, March 28, 2014 12:21 AM
I agree with Austin that this is a proof that the war against drugs is not easy and not very effective. I am just wondering if it wouldn't be easiest to legalize all the drugs and tax them. I think that one way how to legalize it, tax it, and still keep it under control would be creating places where it is allowed to sell the drugs but record the sales and pay taxes on it, and increase the penalties for selling it on black market. This would help to raise the capital for dealing with the black market and to have money for the treatment of the people, since now government has no income from it.
James Greer's comment, March 28, 2014 1:37 AM
I agree with Andrew and Austin; the War on Drugs is a complete failure, and this is just one more example. As far as legalizing and taxing the drugs--I say go for it. However, I would also encourage renewed studies and research on how these drugs affect people--so that we can better inform and be informed on how they truly affect us. We've spent so long being lied to about how Pot is bad for us, I've lost a lot of trust when I'm told about other "bad" things, and so have a LOT of other people. Unfortunately, this means that when real danger becomes apparent, we're less likely to believe it--and a recent example has been some studies of how Marijuana *could* have an effect on the developing brains of younger children/teenagers. And the only reason I believe that one is because--it's a mind altering substance, I wouldn't be at all surprised that altering the mind while it's still developing results in some kind of permanent alteration/effect.
Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Judge orders new sanity evaluation for accused Colorado movie theater shooter

Judge orders new sanity evaluation for accused Colorado movie theater shooter | Criminology | Scoop.it
A judge has ordered that accused Colorado movie theater shooter James Holmes undergo an additional sanity examination, saying there was good cause to believe previous testing was "incomplete and inadequate," according to a ruling issued Wednesday.

Via Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

It's very hard to believe that somebody in their right mind can commit these sorts of crimes, which why I believe the judge wanted another sanity examination. The act that he committed is so unbelievably gruesome and awful that even judges that have seen the most messed up people want to make sure that this person can be considered sane. Perhaps something happened to this individual as a child to make him act the way he did. He may have been abused his entire life and felt the need to express his feelings in the most violent way possible. Whatever the reason, this person will aways be considered insane in my mind.

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Sawyer Skiba's comment, February 20, 2014 11:56 AM
Some people are just evil, plain and simple. This guy deserves the death penalty no matter his state of mind. If he is sane, then he knew his actions and acted. If he is insane, he is likely to act again. He seems to show no remorse for what he did that day. The blank stares he gave in court seem to prove he either doesn't realize or doesn't care about what he did. Anyone that is that carefree after doing something like this deserves to be executed.
Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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New ‘Google’ for the Dark Web Makes Buying Dope and Guns Easy | Threat Level | WIRED

New ‘Google’ for the Dark Web Makes Buying Dope and Guns Easy | Threat Level | WIRED | Criminology | Scoop.it
The dark web just got a little less dark with the launch of a new search engine that lets you easily find illicit drugs and other contraband online.

Via Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

This is just another example of technology making it very easy for a prosperous black market. It is now easier than ever to get any illegal item. When more and more items are deemed illegal, the easier it is for the black market to become even more prosperous. And apparently the internet is also being as a great tool for the black market.

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Koty Emery's comment, April 26, 2014 10:24 PM
This is an interesting idea. I think this might actually be a detriment to the dark web's anonymity, and slightly helpful for law enforcement. While individual users are still very difficult to trace, identifying sites without a direct URL will be a lot easier, therefore the initial recon of finding sites dealing in less than legal actions will be a lot easier. Convenience helps both the buyers and the law enforcement in this case.
Ricky Osborne's comment, April 27, 2014 10:47 PM
Technology has had a major impact on the way we live. Most of these impacts are positive in nature, but as pointed out in this article a small portion has had the opposite effect. The selling of illegal paraphernalia such as drugs and unmarked guns, has been made easier through the use of the internet. Users are able to buy in anonymity with little risk to themselves. Our way of policing needs to adapt quickly to this ever changing world.
Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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The Psychology of Social Status: Scientific American

The Psychology of Social Status: Scientific American | Criminology | Scoop.it
How the pursuit of status can lead to aggressive and self-defeating behavior

Via Professor Jill Jameson, Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

Social status is extremely important in American culture, the amount of money one has defines who they are and what they are capable of. The poor are stereotyped as being weak and many in the lower socioeconomic class are expected to stay there for life. Money is what makes America the way it is, that's why the rich get much more respect than everyone else and are seen as being much more intelligent than everyone else, but that's not always the case. Obama is making small efforts to reduce the gap between the rich and the poor, but his methods are extremely ineffective. The government needs to stop trusting and funding the rich so much so that the lower class have a chance at the American Dream.

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Professor Jill Jameson's curator insight, November 28, 2013 9:26 AM

Interesting article from 2009 published by Scientific American about low-status compensation techniques. 

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One Mexican town finds more security by throwing out the police

About two years ago, citizens in Cherán, Mexico decided to battle illegal logging and drug violence by kicking out the police and running the town according to indigenous tradition.

Via Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

There are many times where more government enforcement is not the answer to our prayers, in fact it can be the opposite. Police are not very effective when it comes to taking care of drug problems. That's why many states are considering legalization of drugs, because whether they're legal or illegal people are still going to use them. When communities come together like this and work together to get rid of their problems, then positive feedback will come back. The citizens of Cherán need to continue what they're doing to make sure that drug-related problems don't come back to haunt them.

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Rescooped by Austin Cullen Rogers from Criminology and Economic Theory
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Roseville teen booked on suspicion of recording, photographing sex with minors - The Sacramento Bee

Roseville teen booked on suspicion of recording, photographing sex with minors - The Sacramento Bee | Criminology | Scoop.it
A Roseville teen is in jail after images of a sexual encounter with a younger girl ended up strewn across social media sites and students’ cell phones – alerting law enforcement to more alleged crimes and igniting a torrent of gossip, accusations and vitriol among his peers.

Via Rob Duke
Austin Cullen Rogers's insight:

Perhaps this teen didn't quite understand the penalties of messing around with underage girls. Maybe his family life isn't that great and in turn he has to resort to sexual pleasure. It's very important that families speak with their children about the kinds of dangers underage sex causes. It's also important to make sure that families explain that with modern technology anything on the internet is not private.

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Susanna's comment, February 23, 2014 9:56 PM
It looks like teens have weird morals, the guy for getting involved with underage girls and filming it and after that showing it to others. Either they think it is fun to act like this or their moral compass is twisted. And the girls even though they are young they should have some knoledge of what is ok and what is not.
Delisa Chapman's comment, March 6, 2014 4:42 AM
I think this issue is on the rise so people need to start educating teens on this issue. I don't know if these teens knew of the penalties for doing this or they just ignored them, but i do think it does need to be taught and made more aware of.