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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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Homer man fatally shoots himself with Alaska State Trooper's gun

Homer man fatally shoots himself with Alaska State Trooper's gun | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Homer man fatally shot himself with an Alaska State Trooper's gun during a struggle Wednesday night, according to the agency. Twenty-four-year-old Aaron Michael Rael-Catholic perished. 
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Carolyn C.'s comment, April 5, 2014 9:48 PM
This seems like a strange situation. I don’t think the Trooper should be penalized in any way. He was doing the right thing; the man got out of his vehicle and started wrestling with the trooper. Sometimes things happen too quickly and I’m sure the trooper didn’t have time to grab the gun from the man when he took it from him. The article said the man fatally shot himself. I would be curious if this were intentionally or not or an accident. I can actually see either being the truth. I also wonder if the trooper or the man started getting physical first. It seems like it was the man because he got out of his vehicle and probably got mad but hard to say. I don’t think we know enough about the situation.
Todd Hallsten's comment, April 7, 2014 7:47 PM
Well the idea of someone taking their life is never good regardless of the situation. For someone to do it during a struggle with a police office makes me think he has priors or had drugs on him or in the vehicle, was on drugs, or couldnt face the charges for assaulting the woman. Uaf Justice class
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Ukraine detains 12 riot police on suspicion of 'mass murder'

Ukraine detains 12 riot police on suspicion of 'mass murder' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
KIEV (Reuters) - Twelve members of Ukraine's disbanded 'Berkut' riot police have been detained on suspicion of shooting peaceful participants in Kiev's months-long anti-government protests, a spokesman
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Ricky Osborne's comment, April 6, 2014 5:49 PM
There were many deaths in the Ukrainian protests. Most, if not all, of these deaths were unjustified. Harming or killing unarmed civilians can not be justified in any way. It is the job of the country's law enforcement to protect and serve the people of Ukraine. These twelve men should be punished accordingly if they are truly guilty of carrying out these mass murders.
Todd Hallsten's comment, April 7, 2014 7:51 PM
If men are providing their life to protect others, perhaps they felt they could take someones with out justice, i dont know what these police were thinking, but i agree with rick, they should be punished if they did commit these mass murders
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Is High-Frequency Trading Insider Trading?

Is High-Frequency Trading Insider Trading? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The federal and state investigations of speed trading may inspire regulators and lawmakers to update the hoary legal definition of insider trading
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Is China the Next Lehman Brothers?

Is China the Next Lehman Brothers? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the past few years, China’s growth rate has slowed, and the country has racked up large debts. How large?
Rob Duke's insight:

White Collar Crime or unpredictable bubbles?

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Todd Hallsten's comment, April 7, 2014 7:58 PM
In my opinion no, because even though we are in debt to china, we always pay back are debt when looking at our track record, meaning we the united states have good credit. and look who employs most of their economy, Foreign transnational corporations.
Todd Hallsten's comment, April 7, 2014 7:58 PM
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Macomb County man beaten by crowd after hitting boy in critical condition

Macomb County man beaten by crowd after hitting boy in critical condition | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Macomb County man remained was fighting for his life Thursday night with severe head injuries after he was attacked by a vigilante neighborhood mob when he stopped to check on a 10-year-old boy poice say he accidentally struck with a truck on Detroi
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Big donors fear shakedown after decision

Big donors fear shakedown after decision | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The biggest Washington donors used to have a great excuse to keep their wallets closed when fundraisers came knocking: Sorry, I’m maxed out. But a Supreme Court ruling swiped that line from them Wednesday when the justices tossed a rule that limited how much an individual can give to candidates, party committees and PACs. Now, fundraisers hope...
Rob Duke's insight:

There's labor (pretty easy to understand).  Dead labor as in Capital that we save up money that we earned through some kind of labor in the past.  There's crime (stealing someone else's labor).  And, then there's Rent where we legitimately or illegitimately demand a portion of someone else's labor or capital.  It's the rent-seeking illegitimate demand that worries folks with this new SCOTUS ruling.  John Stewart, of the Daily Show, interestingly pointed out last night that SCOTUS also ruled that corporations are people and because of this may not be limited in how much money they donate to political campaigns.  Yet, a corporation like G.M. also gets to claim that they are not responsible for killing people because they filed for bankruptcy as GM did in 2009.  This line of rulings by SCOTUS is putting us in very "weird" territory.

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Charles H. Keating Jr., who died at age 90, symbolized the savings & loan crisis era

Charles H. Keating Jr., who died at age 90, symbolized the savings & loan crisis era | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A swimming champion and antipornography crusader early in life, Charles H. Keating Jr. became a hugely successful businessman whose name is synonymous with the savings and loan crisis of the 1980s.
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'Heroic' Female Police Officer Confronted Fort Hood Gunman - NBC News

'Heroic' Female Police Officer Confronted Fort Hood Gunman - NBC News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A female military police officer who ended Wednesday’s Fort Hood shooting rampage by confronting the gunman was praised as “heroic” by army commanders.The of...
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American Samoa's anti-human trafficking law will take effect in June

American Samoa's anti-human trafficking law will take effect in June | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
American Samoa's anti-human trafficking law will take effect in June, after the acting governor, Lemanu Peleti Mauga, signed into law last Friday legislation that criminalizes human trafficking and involuntary servitude.
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Restorative Justice Effort Gains Ground in Santa Ana

Restorative Justice Effort Gains Ground in Santa Ana | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The approach calls for youth offenders to repair the harm created by their crimes and address the needs of their victims.
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Accreditation scheme will boost public confidence | UK Police News - Police Oracle

Accreditation scheme will boost public confidence | UK Police News - Police Oracle | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Baseline competency standard for restorative justice will improve consistency nationally and boost victim confidence.
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DuPont Heir Got Probation for Raping His Daughter. Judge Said He Wouldn't "Fare Well" in Prison.

DuPont Heir Got Probation for Raping His Daughter. Judge Said He Wouldn't "Fare Well" in Prison. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What is wrong with Delaware Judge Jan Jurden, who gave a DuPont heir, Roberts H. Richards IV, probation for raping his 3-year-old daughter? In her mind-boggling order suspending Richards’ eight-year prison sentence, Jurden gave one rationale that should launch a tidal wave of hate mail: Richards “will not fare well”...
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Jonathan Reed's comment, April 2, 2014 11:32 PM
My comment for this article is complete disappoint in the justice system. It's funny because listed among the most offensive and criminal crimes is rape/sexual assault and yet the sentencing is all over the board for someone who violates them. You can get more time now a days for being in possession of a controlled substance than you get for raping a 3 year old child. WHAT THE HELL HAS THE WORLD COME TOO? I'm truly confused. There is no need to explain because there isn't an adequate answer. I'm not one for imprisoning people as a solution but there are crimes that far exceed violation of moral standard or value. Without a hesitant blink we send a man to prison for decades for theft of a candy bar (Kenneth Payne)without a care of if he will "fare well" in prison, but you rape someone and you get a slap on the risk and told not to do it again. WHAT? Double standards, flawed system, or just dumb politicians? Plain and simple i don't care to comment on an obvious flaw in our justice system. Any judge who can attempt to rationalize sympathy for a child rape or rape in any context shouldn't be a justice of the peace. The purpose of prison is punishment for a crime and in most situations the thought of will someone "fare well" in prison hasn't crossed the minds of most judges, but this situation must be different in some way. This is a perfect example of a contradicting system of laws and sentencing.
E.oba's comment, April 24, 2014 2:00 AM
When I first read this, I was very skeptical and I immediately thought that the judge was playing favorites, or giving another ‘one percenter’ a break. But as I read more through the article and thought about all that I have learned about restorative justice, I decided that I actually do see the point the judge was trying to make. The author of the article said, “There are three crucial justifications for criminal punishment: retribution, deterrence, and rehabilitation. It’s the first two of those goals that should be front and center when the crime is the sexual abuse of a child, with the welfare of the rapist coming in a distant third.” While I do agree rape is a horrible crime (especially rape of a child by a parent), I think that the author is looking at this crime from a retribution mindset. Sure throwing this rapist in prison will get him away from children (hopefully) but it will also cost millions of taxpayer dollars and he will never be treated for his mental condition (which is what I believe many child abusers/rapsists suffer from). I think that the rehabilitation aspect was something that the judge had in mind as a better chance of making sure the perp, Richards never repeated this again.
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Not An April Fools' Joke: Russians Petition To Get Alaska Back

Not An April Fools' Joke: Russians Petition To Get Alaska Back | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
After Crimea, is Alaska next? A petition on the White House website calling for just that has more than 37,000 signatures.
Rob Duke's insight:

um?....

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Ricky Osborne's comment, April 6, 2014 5:50 PM
This is some whacky news. To even think about petitioning for the returning of the state of Alaska back to Russia is ridiculous. The United States bought the land from Russia in a fair agreement made between the Russian czar and the President of the United States. I realize that this event was just to show flaws within the White House's petitioning system but I think they could have come up with a better petition.
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Spike in Iran executions seen politically motivated

Spike in Iran executions seen politically motivated | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
BEIRUT (Reuters) - Within the small community of minority Arabs where he lived in southwest Iran, Hashem Shaabani was known as a teacher, an advocate for civil rights and a poet. But to the Islamic Republic
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SC woman gets 20 years in breast feeding overdose

SC woman gets 20 years in breast feeding overdose | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) â€" A judge sentenced a South Carolina woman to 20 years in prison Friday for killing her 6-week-old daughter with what prosecutors say was an overdose of morphine delivered through her breast milk. Both the prosecutor and Greene's lawyer agree no mother has ever been prosecuted in the United States for killing her child through a substance transmitted in breast milk. With no needle marks on the child's body, authorities decided the drugs must have gotten into the infant through her mother's milk, prosecutor Barry Barnette said. Wise argued that prosecutors didn't prove how the baby got the morphine and there is little scientific evidence that enough morphine can gather in breast milk to kill an infant.
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Todd Hallsten's comment, April 7, 2014 8:01 PM
even though and hopefully unintentional, the idea of someone using morphine while pregnant mean that they were not mature enough for a child.
Todd Hallsten's comment, April 7, 2014 8:01 PM
Uaf justice class
Kelley Scott's comment, April 29, 2014 7:16 PM
People like this need to stop reproducing. She is not fit to be a mother. There's no excuse for this, and I feel bad for the child. She's an idiot!
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Iowa Senate rejects human trafficking bill changes

Iowa Senate rejects human trafficking bill changes | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) â€" The Iowa Senate has rejected changes to a bill meant to crack down on certain instances of human trafficking involving minors. The Senate unanimously voted Wednesday to restore a law enforcement training reporting requirement and a victim fund in cases of prostitution involving minors.
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Ex-Microsoft Employee Pleads Guilty to Stealing Trade Secrets

Ex-Microsoft Employee Pleads Guilty to Stealing Trade Secrets | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
For his crime, Kibkalo faces up to 10 years in prison, though the court recommended a sentence of three months.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's work related, but is it really White Collar Crime?  What is distinct about WCC?  Sutherland thought it was significant that WCC suspects had not grown up in the ghetto and committed crimes for the "usual reasons"; and, he thought that folks who had grown up with the "silver spoon" in their mouth might have different reasons for committing crimes.  In recent decades, we've begun to group all non-violent work related crimes into the WCC category, but does that do a disservice to Sutherland's earlier idea about privileged crime?

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Jonathan Reed's comment, April 8, 2014 10:22 AM
I think that it does do a disservice to Sutherlands's idea of privileged crime. There is truth to the privileged crime theory and the grouping of non-violent work related crime with white collar crimes just takes away the seriousness of criminality. What i think shows this is that this guy steals trade secrets and sales them to another company and is only recommended for possible probation and retribution payments. Had this had been a regular lower-middle class man who'd done some what a similar crime he'd be facing multiple yrs. behind bars. This guy didn't seem like he had been raised in poverty or disadvantaged in any way so why the stealing of trade secrets? Monetary gain, privilege, or maybe feeling as though we'd get away with it, all of which draw the same conclusion that Sutherland's privileged crime theory has some application.
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FBI seizes trove of cultural artifacts at 91-year-old Indiana man's home

FBI seizes trove of cultural artifacts at 91-year-old Indiana man's home | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The items, which also came from Haiti, Australia, New Guinea and Peru, were collected by Donald Miller of Waldron over eight decades, FBI Special Agent Robert Jones said at a news conference.
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E.oba's comment, April 24, 2014 2:21 AM
I’m normally against these things because I believe that artifacts that hold cultural and spiritual significance for different groups and tribes should be in their own hands or on display at a museum for all to see. Particularly if the items were obtained illegally and there is a group that wants them back. However, I think that if the FBI determines that this man has legally obtained all of these artifacts he should get to keep them as long as he can prove that he is keeping them in safe conditions. I also think that if he procured some artifacts before laws were written about transactions with them, he should be ‘grandfathered’ in and allowed to keep them (provided that no tribal or government wants them back).
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Crime Inquiry Said to Open on Citigroup

Crime Inquiry Said to Open on Citigroup | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Federal authorities have opened a criminal investigation into a recent $400 million fraud involving Citigroup’s Mexican unit, according to people briefed on the matter, one of a handful of government inquiries looming over the bank.
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McCaskill: GM engineer lied about deadly ignition switch

McCaskill: GM engineer lied about deadly ignition switch | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
General Motors CEO Mary Barra goes before a Senate subcommittee this morning for her second day of testimony before a congressional panel questioning her on a widespread safety recall of millions of vehicles involving a defect linked to 13 deaths and 31 crashes.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's why white collar crime is so difficult.  Who is to blame here?  A lying engineer or the corporate structure that surrounds him/her?

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At Reedley (CA) High School, Suspensions Drop 40%, Expulsions 80% In Two Years • SJS

At Reedley (CA) High School, Suspensions Drop 40%, Expulsions 80% In Two Years • SJS | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In 2009, when the Kings Canyon Unified School District in California’s rural Central Valley offered its 19 schools the opportunity to adopt a system that would reduce school suspensions and expulsions, Reedley High School jumped at the chance. Today, Reedley is in its fourth year of changing a zero-tolerance policy...
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E.oba's comment, April 24, 2014 2:16 AM
This article was amazing! I recently graduated high school not too long ago, so I still remember what it was like to be around (and sometimes be) these kids causing disruptions and not getting along with others and rejecting teacher authority. I commend this school district for realizing that just sending the kid home does not solve the problem, it only makes it worse. I honestly believe that many of these kids, their teachers and school counselors are the only source of stability and positivity in their lives. It’s about time that schools realized that they now have the responsibility of helping youth not just with academic issues, but personal issues as well. I found the idea of informing teachers and other school workers about ‘childhood trauma’ and how to know the symptoms very interesting. Especially how they told them to watch for opposite end of the spectrum of disruptive kids; the ones who sit quietly and do not talk at all. I think these kids are often passed up because the teacher assumes quietness=attentiveness. I think more schools should implement programs like this as well as look at their own suspension policies. I understand how hard it is for teachers to deal with troubled kids (my own mother is a teacher of many low income and at-risk children) but just kicking them out of the classroom can’t be the only option to teachers. They need support of other professionals and ways to mediate and engage kids in class.
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Community has 'a role to play' in solving juvenile incarceration

Community has 'a role to play' in solving juvenile incarceration | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The United States leads the world in incarcerated youth.
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Joshua Livingston's comment, April 1, 2014 10:35 PM
I really like this article because it comes back to what we are always talking about in class that there needs to be more hands on in order to solve juvenile incarceration.
Jonathan Reed's comment, April 2, 2014 10:59 PM
Wow, what a great article. A fantastic way of approaching the problem of juvenile incarceration. What i think is interesting is that the role of the community is finally taken into account. The article makes a very good point of involving those who are primarily effected by crimes caused by juveniles and juvenile incarceration. Leaving the solutions into the hands of the people whom the problem will effect most is the best way of making the greatest impact. Giving the example of the murder case of Ann Grosmaire by her boyfriend Conor Mcbride with the use of "restorative justice" method is a direction that puts emphasis on rehabilitation. For this young man to not only be forgiven by the mother and father of the girl he killed, but for her parents to then go as far as to get involved and request that he not be punished so severely shows the real impact that restorative justice can have. The community has a responsibility that can't be handed off without the expectation of major error. For the U.S to hold the lead in incarcerated youth shows that the methods that we're attempting must not be working as our models project. Getting the people to group together in more intimate conversation to make more of a emotional link is the first step. I'm just surprised that its just being brought to the attention of others. What better than to let victims have a voice in the outcome within the realms of the statue of law.
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'Stiletto Stabbing' Trial Opens With Charge of 25 Hits to Face

'Stiletto Stabbing' Trial Opens With Charge of 25 Hits to Face | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The opening statements in the trial of a 45-year-old Texas woman accused of stabbing her boyfriend to death with her stiletto begins today.
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Joshua Livingston's comment, April 1, 2014 10:32 PM
I don't really believe that this women did it only out of self defense. I do believe that it could have started at that point, but I think that she went beyond what was necessary especially if she smothered him.
Susanna's comment, April 3, 2014 8:44 PM
Maybe it really started as a self defense but the over kill gives the idea that it wasn´t only about getting him away.