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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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Texas man accused of killing drunken driver after crash that killed both his sons

Texas man accused of killing drunken driver after crash that killed both his sons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Texas man has been charged with murder in the fatal shooting at a crash scene of a suspected drunken driver who authorities say plowed into his sons, killing both boys.
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Thanks to Josh for this one:

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Mike Dallaire's comment, February 15, 2013 11:34 PM
The evidence is not sufficient enough to raise the question as to whether or not he actually committed the crime. However, we can speculate and anybody who reads the article, likely will. The big question that comes from it, aside from whether or not one thinks he actually committed the crime, is whether or not he was justified in doing so. It does raising an interesting point as to where the boundaries of justification in law are. Solid arguments could be made on both sides. They of course, in this case would both be right, in my opinion, which means they would also both be wrong. Obviously, as one who abides by the law I'd like to be able to put my full trust in the justice system. Though some parts of the system seem flawed, I believe there's still enough good within the system to put a certain amount of faith in it that a punishment will be handed out. Unfortunately, whether or not the punishment fits the crime is often one of the flaws in the system. Now, I'm no parent but I do have nieces and nephews that I care for dearly. So, if I were a parent I can't imagine the amount of pain and grief this would cause. Assume for a second that there weren't two other children alive and well in the car. Would it matter to you as an individual whether or not you went to jail if the very things, the very people you loved more then life itself had suddenly been taken away from you? For those of you who are local, you may recall the incident at the corner of Steese and Johannsen a few years back where the young girl was struck by a speeding motorist not paying attention. If memory serves correctly, her body stopped over 100 yards from the point of impact. The point of impact being where her shoes were found. I believe a memorial still stands at the intersection. At the time her mother was an employee at Seekins. Can imagine hearing something that close to your work only to have an officer tell you that involves your child? Lets look at it from a different perspective. Since this is not the first DUI related homicide, and unfortunately won't be the last, do you think the guilt felt by the victim is enough of a "punishment?" is it a good deterrent? Or will the guilt from the pain they've caused be too much for them to bear? will you then be looking at a possible suicide or will it drive them further into the bottle? Getting back to the issue at hand, had the drunk driver lived do you think 1) the crime would have fit the punishment? and 2) would the father really care? One more point to think about. Certain cities and states advocate the right for you to be able to defend yourself from those who would do you harm? While most of the time this rule or law is applied to self defense (most particularly in the home), where does one draw the line as to defending themselves or others? Don't get me wrong I'm certainly not an advocate of straight vigilanteism. And though I've probably raised more questions then answers I hope they've been thought provoking.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, February 16, 2013 11:42 PM
At this point they don’t have enough hard evidence to prove he did it, but he certainly had motive, especially in the heat of the moment. My first thought when I had just read the title of this article is that you can put this story into perspective and see a new light shed on the topic. If this were to happen in earlier centuries, the father of the boys would have way more justification on his side. “Eye for an eye” would have applied in this case and the retaliation may have gone unscathed. However this is not the case in modern times. I am in no way legitimizing his reactions to the double death of his sons by the hands of negligence, but his situation does create some sympathy.
Kyle Maines's comment, February 19, 2013 3:19 AM
This really is a shame. I understand why Mr. Barajas did it, thought I don’t fully agree with it. I can’t say I wouldn’t feel like doing the same thing if I was in the same situation. Clearly it was a “heat of the moment” type of crime and whether or not I believe that Banda deserved it for what he did it should have been dealt with correctly, with Banda being arrested and being locked up for the rest of his life. Now on top of losing the two young children the family also has to deal with this.
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Arizona boyfriend killing: Testimony resumes in case - Examiner.com

Arizona boyfriend killing: Testimony resumes in case - Examiner.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Examiner.com Arizona boyfriend killing: Testimony resumes in case Examiner.com As for the deceased's alleged deviant sexual behavior, Arias reiterated throughout her testimony that he made her feel like a prostitute and spoke about fulfilling his...
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Mike Dallaire's comment, February 16, 2013 12:52 AM
Caleb, I couldn't agree more. jealous rage sounds about right. though from what I know about domestic abuse, which is what seems was the cause of this mess, is that it's very difficult to overcome so it would take an extreme amount of rage to do what she did. Obviously I don't condone domestic violence but the whole situation is bad overall. The lie does raise some red flags but it is certainly more believable that she get caught up in the crime. Though to inflict that much violence really takes some effort, I think.
Kristie Major's comment, February 16, 2013 5:46 PM
I think that if she is not lying about her boyfriend's actions, then it is possible that she could do all of those things in self-defense. When people are afraid, they have a tendency to overreact. She probably is lying about something because she has apparently changed her story many times. I think that it would be hard to tell if she deliberately killed him because there is no one who can say if she did or not.
Sarah O'Leary's comment, February 16, 2013 11:50 PM
Maybe the buildup of all her feelings of being “a door mat” in this relationship led her to have such a strong reaction in self-defense; however, it seems that this was a blatant attack that may have gotten out of hand. I don’t mean to down play her situation, but the article says she recants her life as being used and abused in different situations. She is a woman who enables her situation, as sad as it is to say that, and this murder may have been spurred by all the negative situations she’s been through. Cases like this make me question if there should be a reasonable limit to self-defense, especially when it ends in murder. It is clear, that no matter the situation at the time, 27 stabs, a slit throat and a gunshot to the head are not very justifiable to outside parties.
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US Attorney testifying for gun control: I don't know what causes gun violence - Washington Examiner

US Attorney testifying for gun control: I don't know what causes gun violence Washington Examiner Timothy Heaphy, a U.S.
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Kristie Major's comment, February 16, 2013 6:20 PM
I was reading some of the comments for this story and it seems like there are a lot of people who think that guns are only designed to kill. I do not think that guns are only out there to kill other people. Guns are used in other ways like target shooting or hunting to provide food for some families. There are many people who only shoot a gun for the fun of doing so. Knowing how to use a gun is good for people because if they are ever around one then they know how to be safe and avoid accidents.
Kevin Bishop's comment, February 16, 2013 9:15 PM
Aaron, your comment showcases one of the biggest problems with the whole gun control debate. You do not understand what a "assault weapon" is exactly other than its supposedly bad and people can buy it easily at stores. You are completely incorrect. An assault rifle or "weapon" as you call it is a firearm that has multiple settings that change its firing rate. It has a setting that can change it to full-auto, semi-auto, and 3 round burst. If you don't know what those three terms mean, google them. An assault rifle cannot be bought easily at stores. There are rifles that are semi automatic that are dressed up to appear like assault rifles that can be bought at stores. An example of that is the AR-15 or the Mossberg Tactical .22 rifle. I happen to own a Mossberg Tactical and it is a fine firearm. An assault rifle is much harder to obtain and require extensive permits. Also, assault rifles are rarely used in any crimes other than when the Federal Government uses them. An example of that is when the Federal Government passed on many assault firearms to drug cartels in Mexico where those firearms were used extensively to kill innocent people. Several of those people were some of our border control officers. That is just one case, you should look into all the other cases when the Federal Government has killed innocents. Look at all the Native American tribes, Native Alaskan tribes, etc. that were brutally murdered by the Feds. It is interesting that you fear private citizens owning firearms instead of fearing the one that has killed thousands of innocents. Also, I recomend that you read the U.S. Constitution. In it, it states that citizens have the right to bear arms. It does not limit what kind of arms that individuals can own. The writers of the Constitution had the simple understanding that technology changes and evolves in time. Another thing you could do to educate yourself about firearms is to go to a government operated firing range and complete a hunter education course. You may learn that firearms are not these nasty creatures hiding in peoples' closets. Firearms are tools and like all tools they can be used improperly. I own many firearms and use them recreationally and for defense. It is my right granted by the Constitution and has the full backing of current legal law. If gun control continues to increase, the ideas presented in the novel 1984 will become reality.
Rob Duke's comment, February 16, 2013 9:28 PM
Be careful of setting out too firm a position without adequate support. #Kevin: there are two sets of case law that go down two very different roads. You cite only one when you state that the Constitution should be interpreted literally. Another branch of law, suggests that the spirit and intent of the 2nd Amendment was that the states had a right to maintain millitias. I don't have a particulary objection to either position, but it's important to acknowledge both--even if you then attack the position which you don't support--as long as you attack with fact and logic and not with an unsupported statement. The assault weapon definition question is similar. Who defines assualt weapons? Is it a semi-auto weapon or is it one as you describe. Who gets to decide? What are the relative merits of each? Finally, in regards to the "Fast and Furious" investigation in which Federal Officers let weapons "walk" when setting up a sale with Mexican drug cartels, it's important to examine more than just the rhetoric that we hear on talk radio. Is an undercover operation needed in these cases? How else will we determine who's doing the buying and the selling? If we determine that undercover "sting" operations are appropriate, then how are these conducted? First, establish contact. The contact will be suspicious: are you who you say you are? and, can you really deliver the goods? After contact, they will want some time to check out who you are; and then, they'll want to see if you can really deliver. If you're a real bad guy, you also want to check them out and see if they really have the money necessary to complete the deal. Given this, you want a little time and then you want to see their money. At this point, you will both want to do a "show and tell": From across a parking lot or maybe from opposite sides of a bridge, you show me your money and I show you that I have the contraband (guns in this case). Once the "show and tell" is done, the buyer ususally asks for a sample and if you're a real gun runner, you will give them a sample (for a reasonable per unit charge). These guns had better work, too. As a buyer, I'm going to want several so that I'm sure I'm not getting a few good ones with the rest being junk. The guns are the buyers now so if you're going to play the sting operation, you must be prepared to let that product "walk". Later, if the buyer is satisfied with the product, you set up a bigger exchange. Now, you must ask was this reasonable. If it was reasonable, then it may be that using this as an argument in the gun control debate may be nothing more than a "straw man" argument, which is one of the deception tools used in debate.
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Strategy to cut gun crime at risk - Sydney Morning Herald

Strategy to cut gun crime at risk - Sydney Morning Herald | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald Strategy to cut gun crime at risk Sydney Morning Herald The Legal Aid Commission cannot afford to support the government's decision to undermine the right to silence, a meeting of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and the...
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Amber Thompson's comment, February 11, 2013 12:52 AM
Having lawyers present at the police station for suspects makes a great deal of sense. This would help counter a lot of the issues that rural individuals seem to have with understanding the Western system.
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The Death Penalty in 2012 | Death Penalty Information Center

The Death Penalty in 2012 | Death Penalty Information Center | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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Amber Thompson's comment, February 11, 2013 12:55 AM
I am really surprised that it has taken this long for the system to shift. After the countless studies done on the cost, effectiveness, and over all benefit of having the death penalty it took until 2012 for there to be this much of a decrease.
Robert Boutang's comment, February 11, 2013 1:25 AM
I believe we should have the death penalty for crimes involving our national security which there is no doubt that the person is guilty. The death penalty system is very expensive to operate. It takes years for the process to end. We should continue with the death penalty on crimes which there is absolute proof.
Aaron Druyvestein's comment, February 14, 2013 10:02 PM
Interesting. I also wonder why this lack of support for capital punishment came so rapidly. I feel like the public has not been educated any more on the defects of capital punishment than they have the past few decades. I also wonder why executive director Richard Dieter thinks America as a whole considers capital punishment “meaningless.” How did the countries view on the death penalty change to meaningless?
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Amish Sect Leader Gets 15 Years in Beard-Cutting Attacks

Amish Sect Leader Gets 15 Years in Beard-Cutting Attacks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Samuel Mullet Sr. was sentenced along with 15 followers for a series of beard- and hair-cutting attacks on other Ohio Amish that drew national attention.
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Karmen Louise Tobin's comment, February 8, 2013 5:53 PM
This is an article that is much more than Amish man with a beard cutting attack. Attack is the key word that has led this 15 year sentence. WOW! I think that it is very sad and disturbing some of these religious cults start and with the manipulation that controls everyone. It's funny to me how they believe that they are justified and untouchable to think that they can do anything they want and not be held accountable. My question is how does one get free from such a thing and a perspective that I view as a way of brain washing? That is scary! Karmen
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Rape case in Mexican resort city puts violence back in the spotlight

Rape case in Mexican resort city puts violence back in the spotlight | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A high-profile rape case in the Mexican resort city of Acapulco this week was a sharp reminder of significant security problems the country faces.
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Sarah O'Leary's comment, February 12, 2013 3:49 AM
It is pretty clear that Mexico has been a problem for the last few decades with cartels and violence beoming increasingly more popular. The fact that this says "puts violence back in the spotlight" is on the verge of being misleading in the way that the crime went down in the first place. Maybe this new president that took office in december is better at hiding it from american media, but that doesnt mean its not happening.
Brittney Ward's comment, February 15, 2013 1:34 AM
I agree Sarah, It sounds like to me that their new presedent has kept homicide out of the news but in reality its still very present in the area. Keeping crime rates out of the media would make it look like the rates are declining, but that's not always the case. Further more, it doesn't seem like they have high crime between individuals, it's gang crime.
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Blacks Targeted in More Than Half of Stop-and-Frisks, NYPD Stats Show - DNAinfo

Blacks Targeted in More Than Half of Stop-and-Frisks, NYPD Stats Show - DNAinfo | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Blacks Targeted in More Than Half of Stop-and-Frisks, NYPD Stats Show
DNAinfo
NEW YORK CITY — New stop-and-frisk numbers released by the NYPD Monday gave a racial breakdown of the targets in 2011— and showed more than 50 percent of them were black.
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Jolene Stracuzzi's comment, February 10, 2013 2:44 AM
Reading this article I thought of policing in the ghetto. Has the stop and frisk gone in front of the Supreme Court yet and if so was it upheld as legal? How is it, that they don’t need probably cause to stop and frisk you walking down the street but they need it to pull you over in a car? How often are stereotyping involved in the decision to stop and frisk someone?
Caleb Condon's comment, February 15, 2013 1:12 AM
It has, Jolene, Terry v. Ohio. they do not need PC, it is based on "reasonable suspicion". If the officer has a reasonable suspicion that someone has, is, or about to commit a crime (or if they have someone stopped for any other reason) and they have a reasonable belief that they are armed, they can stop and frisk them. "Reasonable suspicion" is a very vague term and is much more lenient than PC, and it is generally easy to come up with "reasonable suspicion" whether it is a legitimate reason or just an excuse. That's a good question. Police have a lot of discretion in making that decision too. But the numbers are pretty shocking... I wonder if it is all racial profiling though? Or could there also be other factors, such as where the majority of patrols take place?
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California Focus: Prison realignment alternatives could be worse - Hanford Sentinel

California Focus: Prison realignment alternatives could be worse - Hanford Sentinel | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California Focus: Prison realignment alternatives could be worse Hanford Sentinel As crime statistics for 2012 gradually filter in from around the state, gripes about the 15-month-old prison realignment program have begun rising in newspaper...
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Jeffery Thompson's comment, February 7, 2013 6:26 PM
OVER CROWDING! For many years this has been an issue that has been talked about by politicians, judicial experts, correctional departments at both the state and federal level. But when the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in and ordered the state of California to release a certain amount of prisioners by a certain date all entities sat up and paid attention. The issue is that these inmates without benefit of Supreme Court order would remain in prison and not be released early. I agree with the article that those inmates that are to be released are not mass murders or those that pose the highest risk to public safety. There can be no guarntees that any released inmate (whether on parole or completion of sentence) will not reoffend. California is facing a situation that is not open to debate, the state must release "X" amount of inmates. Will these inmates commit new crimes or violtae their paroles (due to technical violations) nobody knows and to use satistics to justify defying the U.S. Supreme Court is not finding a solution but rather adding to the turmoil. I agree that prison realignment could be worse. The plan could have ignored high risk and instead implemented that all inmates that have completed 2/3 of their sentences be elgibile. I am sure that there are many high risk inmates that have been repeatadly denied parole are nearing the end of their sentences. Once these inmates complete their sentences how do we stop them from entering society because these inmates are more at risk of committing new crimes. Oakland, San Fransico have always had a high crime rate. The Raiders left in part because of the violence, in the 70's San Fransico was the background for a weekly crime show called the Streets of San Fansico. When I read the article and I read about the increasing crime levels I conclude that with the budget cuts in the police forces it not a rise in crime but rather the lack of appropiate law enforcement agents to stop crime. San Jose also has had its share of crime because of its rural setting. Rather than make unfounded assertions and finger pointing all of these officials need to band together and work on a solution on how to get those officers that were cut due to budget cuts back on the job before those mentioned cities become ground zero for criminals both in and out of state.
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Slain Irvine, California, Couple's Death a Mystery to Police - ABC News

Slain Irvine, California, Couple's Death a Mystery to Police - ABC News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ABC News Slain Irvine, California, Couple's Death a Mystery to Police ABC News The shooting death of a couple has mystified police in Irvine, Calif., with indications that they were shot by someone outside their car and were not robbed, police said...
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Jeffery Thompson's comment, February 7, 2013 6:47 PM
What is sensless about these deaths is that they are both reported now to be victims of a vengeful ex police officer, aho had a personal grievance aginst the young womans father. This happened on Sunday and it wasn't till this morning when the same officer gunned down a protective detail that it all came to light. Now a highly trained individual not only in military tatics but also police tatics is on the loose. This morning I listened to the news reports and heard more than one expert state that this situation will not end peacefully nor quickly. As a trained law enforcement officer this man clearly isn't hiding to escape but rather formulating his next attack. The couple killed were guilty by association only. Now those family members of other officers who Dorner blames are living in a world of fright. The police have proven they are not immune to this high level of nervousness as it has been reported that two innocent individuals were shot by police in a case of mistaken identity. Dorner is accomplishing more chaos and havoc being loose and costing the city more money. Don't get me wrong this individual needs to hunted down, but I point out that he is not your typical criminal, and I would assume that he knows he will be prosecuted to the fullest and be a target within prison walls. Simply stated he has nothing to lose by not being taken alive, this isn't dramatics but just a fact.
Mona Brown's comment, February 10, 2013 2:03 AM
This story is sad. This woman had a great career and future that was cut short by an ex-police officer with a grudge. It's disheartening that Christopher Dorner didn't handle this differently. All he had to do was go public with how the LAPD fired him because of the allegations he brought forward. It seems like he had all the proof to show that the Justice system failed to protect him and serve justice to those that wronged him. Killing innocent people is not the way to handle it and makes his case less credible. Obviously there is something mentally wrong with this man or he finally just snapped.
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California Prison Realignment Controversy Continues - Correctional News

California Prison Realignment Controversy Continues - Correctional News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California Prison Realignment Controversy Continues
Correctional News
California's ongoing prison realignment adventure continues to evolve as various counties come up with their own unique strategies for addressing a changing justice system.
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Feds: S&P defrauded investors, fueled crisis

Feds: S&P defrauded investors, fueled crisis | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. government accused Standard & Poor's of inflating ratings on mortgage investments to boost its bottom line, taking aim at a key player in the run-up to the financial crisis.
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Colby Wallace's comment, February 6, 2013 4:40 AM
This is amazing that in today’s world something like this can make for as long as it did. It makes you wonder what other people are doing with our money. Crime has changed in this age; it is now something that we can barely see hidden behind a façade of computer screens and passwords. The scariest kind of civil crime is the kind you can’t see.
Moe's Legal Shop's comment, February 7, 2013 7:32 PM
I know cases of trust accounts that are hacked and attacked with no legal reprocussions to the crimes committed yet, but word is a class action lawsuit will encompass many who were victim of such crimes with monies. I hope they get a team together to regulate such accounts so that the owner can be protected and funds safe.
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5 Security Holes Almost Everyone's Vulnerable To

5 Security Holes Almost Everyone's Vulnerable To | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Problems with security seem to pop up all the time—from an easy to hack router to apps that leak your data into the world. Thankfully, it's pretty easy to protect yourself.
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Zach Bohan's comment, February 7, 2013 12:46 AM
Good article. I can't even start to count how many times I had my MySpace password phished back in the day because I was not on an HTTPS. These are things everyone should know
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The hunt for Christopher Dorner: Do reward offers help or hinder? - Christian Science Monitor

The hunt for Christopher Dorner: Do reward offers help or hinder? - Christian Science Monitor | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Christian Science Monitor The hunt for Christopher Dorner: Do reward offers help or hinder?
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Kristie Major's comment, February 16, 2013 5:37 PM
I think that rewards can be helpful because if people do not know that the information they have is being looked for. By broadcasting the reward offer, people can be informed that this information is being looked for. They can also be helpful because by knowing that people will be looking out for them, criminals might be discouraged from going out to commit crimes. They might also think that it is better to hide out rather than be seen by anyone who would report them. The downside to rewards is that everyone will come in with information and it may not all be true. All of this information needs to be sorted through to see if it is relevant.
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Some hate crime victims are not aware that they're victims - Science Omega

Some hate crime victims are not aware that they're victims - Science Omega | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Science Omega Some hate crime victims are not aware that they're victims Science Omega In October of last year, ScienceOmega.com spoke to Dr Neil Chakraborti, the study's Principle Investigator and Senior Lecturer in Criminology at the University...
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T Hall's comment, February 15, 2013 5:51 PM
One of the unfortunate outcomes of hate crimes includes the years of distress individuals endure because of seemingly normal events within their environment. Some individuals are exposed to negative and destructive behavior on a daily basis, resulting in the individual conforming to the negative ideals or being able to manifest enough energy to break the cycle of abuse.
Joe L.'s comment, February 17, 2013 11:41 AM
How does one define what constitutes a "hate crime", and how can the state prove intent on the part of the offender? These are the questions I am left with.
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Facing up to the law: increasing surveillance raises privacy concerns - Sydney Morning Herald

Facing up to the law: increasing surveillance raises privacy concerns - Sydney Morning Herald | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Facing up to the law: increasing surveillance raises privacy concerns Sydney Morning Herald Garner Clancey, the deputy director of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, warned against the proliferation of cameras for the purpose of facial...
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Cord Hege's comment, February 10, 2013 10:11 PM
One crime solved per 1000 cameras? I’m surprised people are even talking about privacy concerns when the cameras have a success rate like that. Talk about a money pit.
Amber Thompson's comment, February 11, 2013 12:49 AM
I agree that it is a huge money pit but also we are already doing this here in the United States. Of course not with the same software but we have been using artists composites and video surveillance to solve crimes for a long time. This is a way to ensure that the accurate person is being charged. I do not think this is a realistic solution for the US at this point in time.
Nathaniel Moreland's comment, February 16, 2013 7:32 PM
The question on privacy issues is pretty good in this article though, while it's purpose in how effective can be argued, the resulting cameras left over could lead right in to some Big Brother issues.
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Kake teen's slaying shocks village; investigators press on | Crime | ADN.com

Kake teen's slaying shocks village; investigators press on | Crime | ADN.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"It's overwhelming at times," said Kip Howard, the victim's father. "But we're dealing with things and trying to stay strong, because we just have to."
Rob Duke's insight:

This will test Kake's restorative justice system.  Verticle prosecution seems likely, if the suspect is found, but the father's comments that his daughter wouldn't want them to be angry makes one stop to think....

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Robert Boutang's comment, February 11, 2013 1:41 AM
This terrible tragedy which happened in this small close native community will have a tragic effect on the whole community especially the children. I worked as a Alaska State Trooper in Juneau many years ago. I realize how close the villagers are to one another. The fact that there are so many visitors in the village at that time of certainly make the investigation harder. The Alaska State troopers are very professional organization I know they will solve this crime.
Kamdon Thompson's comment, February 14, 2013 1:13 PM
I am all for restorative justice practices and I think that they work the best in close communities such as Kake but this kind of crime is so appalling that vertical prosecution seems to be the only solution. The level at which these communities can forgive offenders and seek to reintegrate them back into the community is highly commendable but if the murderer in this case is from Kake I do not think that the members of the community will allow that person to come back for along time, if ever, unless there is a major change in that persons life. The fathers statement that they are not allowing themselves to be angry is nothing short of incredible and shows the strength of traditional village values. Prayers for this family and community and for the Alaska State Troopers.
Aaron Druyvestein's comment, February 14, 2013 9:53 PM
Very sad. I will be interested in how the community will handle this tragedy. I believe the Troopers should keep their investigations on this case in particular, behind the media’s attention. A small village like this would tear apart anyone that is even suspected of this crime. I am from a city of 30,000 and remember an individual suspected of killing a beloved wild wolf that has been around the city for years. Though it was never proven, their family was destroyed and was ridiculed by the community, then eventually being forced to leave the city.
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Welcome to the world's nicest prison

Welcome to the world's nicest prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Off Norway, murderers and rapists sunbathe and tend cows. Norwegians stand up for this brand of justice, even as the trial of an admitted mass killer is under way.
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Brittney Ward's comment, February 15, 2013 1:47 AM
This type of prison is working very well in Norway, but like Taylor said I can't see our society accepting this type of prison. I think it is great that the prisoners have to apply and be accepted to the island. It seems to me that this would serve more as a rehabilitation instead of punishment. I think rehabilitation is a great way to help reintegrate ex-convicts into society and it is the best hope for real change in people. The Main reason why I think this would not work in America is because I can't see tax payers wanting to pay for criminals to housed at a location and in better conditions than they themselves live in.
Carolyn C.'s comment, February 15, 2013 6:26 PM
I can understand why Norway would want to do this. It is a good idea to start the transition from jail life to real like society but what is the prison system teaching them? Does it really teach them a lesson. It makes them feel like they're part of a normal society and they don't deserve that treatment. That is why they are called criminals. Just because they have the resources, doesn't mean they should be taking these actions. The individuals did something bad and there for they do not deserve to be treated like everyone else. They need to be taught a lesson.
Kevin Bishop's comment, February 16, 2013 9:25 PM
I think this is a good idea. It would probably be best used for criminals that committed nonviolent crimes. I think that it is possible for this system to be used in the United States but that it would take a long period of time for it to become popular. Some members of the population believe that strong punishments should be handed out for minor offenses such as marijuana use. Those members would be the sticking point for this concept.
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9/11 Hate-Crime Victim Seeks To Save His Attacker : NPR

9/11 Hate-Crime Victim Seeks To Save His Attacker : NPR | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rais Bhuiyan was shot in the face by Mark Stroman in 2001. Stroman was on a shooting spree, targeting people who appeared to be Muslim or of Middle Eastern descent.
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Karmen Louise Tobin's comment, February 8, 2013 5:33 PM
This story brought tears to my eyes. There are so many levels to discuss on this story. Something that Rais Bhuiyan said that is so true and powerful is that Mark Stroman already had dies many times mentally and now he is just waiting to die physically. He wishes for his heart to change and that forgiveness I am saying is so powerful. Mark Stroman stated how truly and how deeply he was sorry and that this is the first act of kindness that he has ever known. The Islamic beliefs are to save one person is the same as saving mankind. To me this is how we should be and to have the value of life just like this! Karmen
Mona Brown's comment, February 10, 2013 1:46 AM
This a true story of forgiveness. I have to be honest, I don't know if I would be this forgiving, especially if someone caused me to lose part of my vision, along with murdering others. This man has shown no matter how horrid the crime or violent act a person has committed, there is always a path to redemption. Even though I am a Christian, hearing him talk about the saying that states, "In Islam it says that saving one human life is the same as saving the entire mankind." This is so true. By showing forgiveness to one, that person in turn shows forgiveness to others and so it begins to spread like wildfire. This is a perfect example of a victim asking for his attacker to seek the restorative and rehabilitative path in the Justice system.
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Sharp drop in drink deaths follows alcohol price rise

Sharp drop in drink deaths follows alcohol price rise | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Increasing the minimum price of alcohol by 10 percent can lead to immediate and significant drops in drink-related deaths and may also have long-term beneficial health effects, according to a study published on Thursday...
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Mona Brown's comment, February 10, 2013 2:01 AM
Robert I think you bring up a good point. I really think there needs to be more statistical research done on this before they come up with these kind of conclusions. Maybe there a slump in the economy at the time, that an effect on the purchase of alcohol during that time frame. If not, then possibly it did have an effect. If true this could be something the U.S. considers, although I do not think it will go over well with business owners. As i stated above, more statistical research needs to be conducted first.
Kassandr Liesenfeld's comment, February 13, 2013 5:12 PM
If a 10% price rise decreases the number of drink deaths, this affects only people who cannot effort spending more money on alcohol. Even though it might be accurate that unemployed individuals are more likely to get addicted to alcohol, a policy based on the cost of alcohol only shifts the consumption to "higher classes".
Zach Bohan's comment, February 21, 2013 3:05 AM
I could definitely see how a rise in price would lead to a decrease in consumption. Especially among families on tight budgets where alcoholism is usually a higher factor. Then again, this is from fox news...
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Mixed-Use Neighborhoods Reduce Some Violent Crimes, Study Says

Mixed-Use Neighborhoods Reduce Some Violent Crimes, Study Says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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T Hall's comment, February 15, 2013 6:00 PM
Combining residential and business sectors may reduce crime for the mere fact of constant traffic to and from the areas. For the sake of maintaining sanity, I think this blend of residential and work-related environment would not give individuals a break from really being able to escape work. Also, I would be concerned about children being able to have a safe and peaceful play environment due to so much traffic, people, etc (many other factors to consider as well).
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LA police pore over 12,000 pages of priest abuse records for leads ...

LA police pore over 12,000 pages of priest abuse records for leads ... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES -- Los Angeles police are combing through some 12000 pages of priest abuse records released last week by the city's Catholic archdiocese to determine whether to open any new criminal investigations, ...
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Kiara's comment, February 7, 2013 3:51 PM
This story is sickening. How traumatic for the families who have to go through this with a person that they "trusted". Its scary to think that a "man of God", who is supposed to follow bible principles and strive to lead an honorable life that God would be proud of, could do something so detestable to him. This situation would make anyone question the legitimacy of a church/religious organization. A lot of the people who attend these churches have been going for a very long time, knew the priests well and maybe even had outside relationships with their families. How shocked to find out the disgusting lives they were leading, while they were telling the church members how to lead and conduct their lives. Their so much bad in the world, it's hard to believe that within a person's religious worship there are things like this going on. It would be the last thing I would expect...but then again maybe not now-a-days (as sad as it is to say that).
Moe's Legal Shop's comment, February 7, 2013 7:30 PM
Governor Frank Murkowski in 2003 reversed the Statutes of Limitations...shortly there after the Natives came forward about abuses in the villages where the Catholic Church had boarding houses and schools for the children. It got on the media and soon there after, stories from the lower 48 came out and eventually it went global with reports from Ireland and England in the Catholic Church...so I am glad the awareness is there now...no more silence...
Lindsey Giacomelli's comment, February 10, 2013 11:07 PM
This is insane! I am a Catholic myself and I can't stand this, I feel like you hear about it all the time in the news. These priest that are doing this need to be arrested and tried, not just moved to another church or removed of their duties. Church is supposed to be a place where you feel safe, not a place where you're afraid to leave your children. Priest are supposed to be people we are able to look up too and confide in, and they should be held to higher standard. Crimes like this can't be swept under the rug, but prosecuted.
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Colombia rebels call for decriminalization of drug crops - GlobalPost

Colombia rebels call for decriminalization of drug crops - GlobalPost | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Colombia rebels call for decriminalization of drug crops
GlobalPost
Colombia's leftist FARC guerrillas on Wednesday called for the decriminalization of the cultivation of marijuana, coca leaf and poppies in the country.
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Judge denies delay in Zimmerman's June trial

Judge denies delay in Zimmerman's June trial | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Trayvon Martin would have turned 18 Tuesday. Instead, lawyers for George Zimmerman, the man accused of murdering the teen, and prosecutors were back in court to discuss evidence and a trial date.
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Kassandr Liesenfeld's comment, February 13, 2013 5:19 PM
I agree that a speedy trial has way more deterring effect than postponing the trial date again and again. Of course prosecution and defense need to have enough time to prepare and collect evidence. However, those left behind AND the perpetrator deserve a decision shortly after the act to have a chance to process and move on.
Brittney Ward's comment, February 15, 2013 1:22 AM
I also think it is a good thing the judge denied the motion to delay the trial. Like Kamdon said, its been almost a year and it's time for a verdict. If the delay would have been granted the case would be drawn out even further delaying justice ofr the victim and his family. while delaying a trial allows the defense more time, it also prolongs the perpetrator from receiving his/her sentence.
Kyle Maines's comment, February 22, 2013 6:04 AM
Like others I agree the judge made the right call denying a delay in the trial. Its been so long since this happened I'd forgotten about it until I saw the story. Not only does it take away the deterrence value but also keeps the family from moving forward and prolongs their grief, hurting them even more than they already have. I'm amazed they let them draw it out this long.
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Prosecutors ask for life sentence for leader of Amish group convicted of beard-cutting in Ohio

Federal prosecutors want a life sentence for the leader of an Amish breakaway group convicted in a series of beard- and hair-cutting attacks in Ohio.
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Robert Boutang's comment, February 9, 2013 4:26 PM
This is a 62-year-old ex-Amish person. The federal prosecutor’s case is way out of reality. Even a force was used and Mullet was the leader someone getting a life sentence is way out of line.

This is a 62-year-old ex-Amish person. The federal prosecutor’s case is way out of reality. Even a force was used and Mullet was the leader someone getting a life sentence is way out of line.

This is a 62-year-old ex-Amish person. The federal prosecutor’s case is way out of reality. Even a force was used and Mullet was the leader someone getting a life sentence is way out of line.

This is a 62-year-old ex-Amish person. The federal prosecutor’s case is way out of reality. Even a force was used and Mullet was the leader someone getting a life sentence is way out of line.

This is a 62-year-old ex-Amish person. The federal prosecutor’s case is way out of reality. Even a force was used and Mullet was the leader someone getting a life sentence is way out of line.

This is a 62-year-old ex-Amish person. The federal prosecutor’s case is way out of reality. Even if force was used and Mullet was the leader, someone getting a life sentence for this crime is way out of line.
Jolene Stracuzzi's comment, February 10, 2013 2:52 AM
I understand this can be construed as a hate crime. I understand the aspects of the beard to an Amish man. What I do not understand is a life sentence. Yes I think the man should be tried on assault, sure throw in hate crime with it. I just think that a life sentence is a bit harsh in my opinion. I can agree with the term his lawyer is asking for.
Kyle Maines's comment, February 22, 2013 6:16 AM
I remember seeing a news story on this after it happened. I was amazed at how extremely upset the amish were about this. It was like Mullet and his men had killed those people and not just cut their beards. Like Mandy said it is a sign of manhood and a very important part of amish life. So I understand why the prosecutor would ask for such a stiff sentence, though I have no reason to believe that a judge will see it that way.