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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World

How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Breastfeeding can be a polarizing topic. Views vary not only from person to person, but also country to country, according to a new survey examining women's opinions on breastfeeding.

Via Seth Dixon
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biggamevince's comment, October 3, 2014 6:53 PM
From the data in the article it looks like universally, breastfeeding is seen as a natural occurrence. I think it is more of a human nature behavior rather than a social norm. Therefore it is not as embarrassing in most countries. However in France, about half of the citizens would feel embarrassed if they breastfed in public. The other half feel fine with breastfeeding in public. What this article does not show is how this topic is viewed in Middle Eastern countries.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:59 AM

How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:04 AM

How women are treated is something that differs from culture to culture. This issue of breastfeeding reflects a few different issues that are present in society. First of all is the treatment of women and their control over their body.Secondly, child rearing norms and third public openness. 

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Australian judge says incest may no longer be a taboo - Telegraph

Australian judge says incest may no longer be a taboo  - Telegraph | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Judge in Australia says incest may no longer be a taboo and the only reason it is criminal is potential birth abnormalities, which can be solved by abortion
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Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 27, 2014 4:42 PM

Being pro-life, I have a hard time seeing the logic in deeming the act of incestuous relationships acceptable and decriminalizing them, but considering the result of the act (potential birth abnormalities in babies) the incriminating factor. Furthermore, I cannot morally condone this judge saying "solve this problem with abortions".

 

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He's no longer a prisoner of the war on drugs

He's no longer a prisoner of the war on drugs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The excitement had been building all day. On election day 2008, every TV in the prison was tuned to the news.
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CSUN Professor Uses Scientific Approach to Understand Religion

CSUN Professor Uses Scientific Approach to Understand Religion | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Few topic generate such heated debate as science and religion, but one professor believes a scientific study of the mind can help us understand religion.
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We'll discuss religion as a major precursor to more advanced institutional arrangement, including the ability to hold together much larger "states".  Is this something hard-wired into humans?

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Alaska legalized weed 39 years ago. Wait, what?

Alaska legalized weed 39 years ago. Wait, what? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
You'll never guess what happened next.
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Joshua Matheny's comment, September 26, 2014 6:29 PM
Interesting read, every once in a while this topic of pot being legal in Alaska (state not federal) gets brought up in various Justice classes and it has always been funny to me that there is never a concrete answer as to why it is only sometimes enforced and not always enforced, or only enforced in certain areas. I really enjoyed the information at the bottom of the page that showcased Alaska's usage rate compared to its dependency rates, really puts things into perspective when we move forward with the bill that is trying to legalize marijuana on a statewide level. I wonder if these laws that have been in limbo will be overrun at that time... I would assume so.
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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 3:07 AM
Its interesting to see the different cultural traditions that are set at different stages in a persons life as the beginning into adulthood for most. I don't think I would want to be a male in the Brazilian Amazon, or the island of Vanuatu where you literally put your life on the line to prove your ready for adulthood. It shows the differences and what is considered important or the role the person plays in society. I think the mention of the sweet 16 for American girls was a pretty weak presentation. America is a melting pot and represents so much more than that.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:59 AM

These traditions reflect the cultural geographies they take place within. In the Brazilian Amazon, the locals use the bullet ants native to the area to use in their Bullet Ant Initation. On North Baffin Island, where Inuits must be able to navigate and hunt in the wilderness of the artic, their coming of age involves a hunting journey that begins with them opening up the lines of communication between men and animals a relationship that the survival of the community hinges on. In the Amish tradition, they send their youth out into the world to witness the perils of modern society as a way to provide them with the choice of Amish Living. In Central and South America, girls have a Quinceanera where they girls solidifies their commitment to her family and faith two very important ideals of that culture. These coming of age traditions reflect the cultural differences between places throughout the world.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 1:34 AM

I think this article could also fit into the view of culture of gender. The fact that there are separate celebrations in Jewish culture represent the divide between men and women. The Satere-Mawe tradition of wearing bullet ant gloves in order for boys to demonstrate their "manliness" is actually quite sexist. It demonstrates how men must behave in "manly" ways and not cry in order to be viewed as a "true" man. This creates a mentality in boys from a very young age that they must not be "feminine," and that they must be more headstrong than girls to be viewed as a man. The same goes for the Vanuatu tradition. Young boys have to go to the extreme (jump from tall towers with a simply a rope around their legs to keep them from dying) to prove their manhood. Of course these traditions are an important part of their culture, and I have no right to criticize, but I am simply providing an alternative analysis of these traditions.

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New police 'drunk and disorderly' powers penalise Aborigines, youth, homeless and mentally ill (NSW)

New police 'drunk and disorderly' powers penalise Aborigines, youth, homeless and mentally ill (NSW) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
New powers handed to NSW police to tackle alcohol-related violence are disproportionately penalising Aboriginal people, the homeless and the mentally ill, the state Ombudsman has found.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 2:58 AM
This case sounds like a way for police to target individuals who are usually on the street from solicitation or loitering, but using the excuse that they are drunk and disorderly as a way to make these people leave the area. Also the fact that the fines have more than tripled and clear guidelines are not laid out seems unfair. I don't think this would be able to hold up in a place like New York. The jail system would be overcrowded with homeless unable to pay fines, and the Police unable to do much of anything else but play babysitter. Sounds like they need more options for these people they are targeting, perhaps instead they can offer avenues where to get help for the disorders they may have.


Mandy Burris's comment, October 3, 2014 9:22 PM
This sounds remarkably familiar to me. This could easily be an article about how the Fairbanks Police Department was dealing with inebriates in downtown Fairbanks until options like the Detox Center and the Community Service Patrol gave them other options. Just replace "Aboriginal people" with "Alaskan natives" and you'll find you've likely read this story before and it was set much closer to home.
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Alaska TV reporter quits on air to promote pot

Alaska TV reporter quits on air to promote pot | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A reporter for an Alaska TV station revealed on the air that she owns a medical marijuana business and was quitting her job to advocate for the drug.
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Kristi Gray's comment, October 1, 2014 4:36 PM
Brandon, I agree that she was very unprofessional!
I think that anyone who watches or reads about the way she quit would be shocked that she would do so in such a way. I would call it both unprofessional and unethical.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 2, 2014 2:43 AM
This story just makes me think about the saying “there is a time and a place” and I believe she got it wrong. Standing up for something you believe in is correct, but she also had the responsibility to remain professional in the environment she was in. This does not help the cause for legalization of marijuana when the ones representing the cause are using foul language and no professionalism. This is not the example to set for the cause, she had a forum and a platform and she could have turn it into something positive if she had remain intelligent in the way she approached it. Instead I believe she acted childish, and I dislike Alaska being in the headlines for something like this.
biggamevince's comment, October 3, 2014 8:27 PM

This article is funny. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion however, if you are going to promote it, be prepared for any backlash. There is a time and place for certain things but you must be aware of your actions. There are potential repercussions for voicing your opinion especially on live tv where everyone can see you. Any future endeavors can become jeopardized. If you are willing to sacrifice for what you believe in then do what is necessary within reason.
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Leaving dead presidents in peace

Leaving dead presidents in peace | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SINCE cash was invented in the seventh century BC, it has generally been the most convenient way to pay for everyday purchases. But as electronic payments get...
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Getting to "si"

Getting to "si" | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THEY put a brave face on it in Catalonia. The Scottish "no" vote, said Catalan president Artur Mas, was a triumph for democracy and an enviable example of how to...
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A little something for you Comparative Criminology folks...

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Sixx decades ago, Robert K. Merton argued that there was a series of ways in which Americans responded to the extraordinary cultural emphasis that their society placed on getting ahead. The most co...

Sixx decades ago, Robert K. Merton argued that there was a series of ways in which Americans responded to the extraordinary cultural emphasis that their society placed on getting ahead. The most co... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Gangster’s Guide to Upward Mobility ("Sixx decades ago, Robert K.
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Missionaries accuse Brazil of allowing infanticide - USATODAY.com

Missionaries accuse Brazil of allowing infanticide - USATODAY.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The missionaries, associated with the U.S.-based group Youth With A Mission, say the Brazilian government is turning a blind eye to the killing of babies born with birth defects, many of which are treatable by western medicine.
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Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 27, 2014 5:05 PM

I have a sister-in-law who works full time with YWAM - Youth With a Mission. When they go out and build homes for families in extremely impoverished situations, often times they meet kids who are not properly taken care of, and even have seen young kids being responsible for providing food and clothing for their younger siblings. After visiting Africa, I saw first hand the infanticide issues discussed in this article. Many times the parents will put the child with birth defects in a deep well to die, since they don't find value in people with birth defects. There isn't really any legal implications enforced to prevent this from happening, thus perpetuating the problem.

biggamevince's comment, October 3, 2014 8:41 PM
This is an extreme case. This comes back to how Brazilians define the good life. In their tradition, they consider an infant who has a birth defect taboo and unfit to live in their society so the child is killed. In this culture it is seen as a mercy killing because they do not believe that the child will survive. The western missionaries argue that the government is turning a blind eye to this issue and it is a human rights violation because the defects are treatable through western medicine. However some Brazilians do not have access to western medicine.
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Infanticide Statistics | All Girls Allowed

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Here's a few articles on different cultures' ideas on infanticide...

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About-face

About-face | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The great sage THE Confucius Institutes programme, an ambitious soft-power effort by China to support education overseas, has been dealt a setback by one of its most...
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Incest Is 'Taboo' but Shouldn't Be Illegal, German Experts Say - NBC News

Incest Is 'Taboo' but Shouldn't Be Illegal, German Experts Say - NBC News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
MAINZ, Germany -- An advisory board to Germany's government has called for a revision of the country’s incest law, which would end the criminalization of sex...
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, October 2, 2014 6:36 PM

This is an interesting issue being addressed. My personal opinion on incest is that it is immoral and there is a level of perversion that a family member could look at their family member and feel those sort of ways for them and feel like it is okay. I feel that there is right and there is wrong. I also disagree even on the basis that when two family members like this article shares starts a family by extending their own blood line they share by having children together is intentionally inflicting harm on another which is their babies being born having disabilities because of incest. I can't see how something like this could be found to be permissable.

biggamevince's comment, October 3, 2014 7:11 PM
In the United States, incest is considered wrong, immoral and illegal. The disabilities that can occur to the child are probably a contributing factor into why incest is illegal. In some countries in including America, the relatives that you are close to, it is taught that incest is taboo. However, in this situation the two people are long lost relatives, and did not have any prior contact. They eventually discovered that they are related. Now this topic become difficult to decipher because they did not have prior contact until after the relationship but because they are related by blood, their relationship is considered incestuous by society and law. Even with family members who are adopted and not related by blood, in some cultures, a romantic relationship with them is considered incest.
Mandy Burris's comment, October 3, 2014 9:14 PM
I feel like if something like incest is agreed to be morally wrong by a majority of the population then it should be able to be presented for and passed into law if the vote allows it. It has been seen that close relatives that procreate have children with many different disabilities. This creates added difficulties for the family and is something that should be taken into consideration whether the act is illegal or not. Things are often taboo for a reason. Sometimes that taboo is founded on false information and should be changed or ignored, but others continue to stand.
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Who’s Getting Caught In The “School-to-Prison” Pipeline? And Why?

Who’s Getting Caught In The “School-to-Prison” Pipeline? And Why? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The U.S. prison population is disproportionately black. The same racial disparity can be seen in the students who are punished in the nation’s schools. The connection between these two phenomena are stronger -- and more insidious -- than many may understand.

Via up2-21
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Kristi Gray's comment, October 1, 2014 4:18 PM
This article mentions a few possible theories why black students get in trouble more than white students at school. I believe that the problem of black students getting into more trouble than white students at a much higher rate is due to many, many contributing factors. You can never apply just one theory to a situation. The theories mentioned in this article are having for-profit prison systems, law enforcement “over-police” and see all non-white youth as potential criminals, students that are most likely to be suspended are underachieving students who school officials knowingly and excessively refer to law enforcement, and the lack of financial resources in low-income school districts. I think the order of least likely to most likely of the theories would be in the order I listed them. The only one that I think has the most possibility of being accurate is the last theory.
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Military suicide prevention: lessons from Israel

Military suicide prevention: lessons from Israel | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
News emerged this week that two more Canadian Forces soldiers had taken their own lives. Advocates and military families continue
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Brandon Jensen's comment, October 1, 2014 2:52 AM
I think if there is potential to learn more from other countries about how to help people with PTSD, then we should take the opportunity to learn from each other. Combining knowledge can be a powerful tool and there is no real downside to a situation such as this one, when it comes to shared knowledge.
Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, October 2, 2014 6:58 PM

This story is sooo sad to me. Military suicide prevention has to be addressed and I believe strongly that what our soldiers go through to defend our countries shouldn't be suppressed in the severity for Post traumatic Stress Syndrome. To get our troops taken care of is important.  

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 3, 2014 2:48 AM
I think the reason the prevention works with Israel is the mention that within their forces the stigma of mental illness does not exists like it does in other countries military. Until we can overcome the stigma and provide the proper mental health options for troops the high risk of PTSD and suicides will continue to rise. I currently work in Military Health care and have knowledge of multiple military members taking their lives in the two years I have worked in my office. Six suicides and I only remember one making it to the local newspaper. The others were never known other than immediate families and maybe a few co-workers. Falling back in line with the mental health failings in the current system. The Israel military mentions bringing mental health in line right up there with physical health which is great. The two really do go together and if you have a breakdown of one the other will suffer. It would be great if the system in the United States could change but I think with todays societies economy and the uncertainty, this also reflects the inability to seek help out of repercussion or loosing a job and being put on the VA’s imaginary waiting list. The sad reality that it is.
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AK Beat: Alaska too 'weird' to serve as test case for legal marijuana?

AK Beat: Alaska too 'weird' to serve as test case for legal marijuana? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Washington Post's Wonk Blog broke down issues with Alaska's complicated marijuana laws Wednesday, noting the implications of the Ravin decision, the Alaska Supreme Court ruling that found individual privacy protects the possession of small amounts of marijuana in the home.
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Kristi Gray's comment, October 1, 2014 4:27 PM
This title sure got my attention! Laws regarding marijuana in Alaska are a little confusing. I think it is funny that they would say “Alaska is just weird” in the article. Our state is different, even when it comes to marijuana laws.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, October 2, 2014 2:55 AM
So Alaskans smoke twice as much weed as other states? The population is still small compared to elsewhere. I think outside resources still don't understand what goes on in Alaska as far as policies and maybe thats why felons like to come to Fairbanks to hide out? It will be interesting to watch what happens in the November election and how the local police departments will respond to the issue. Also in the highly populated areas military members reside and it will still be illegal for them to consume, so will local law enforcement work with military on these issues or just ignore it in general to focus on other cases? So many unanswered questions. Its a wait and watch game.
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Alaska legislative committee reviews progress on crime-reduction bill

Alaska legislative committee reviews progress on crime-reduction bill | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska House and Senate Judiciary Committee members met Monday in Anchorage to discuss “criminal justice reinvestment,” or how the lofty goals set in a crime omnibus bill passed during the legislative session are being addressed.
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Can a "Firewall Strategy" Keep Big Energy Out of Climate Talks? It Worked for Fighting Tobacco

Kicking the polluters out of the negotiations may sound like wishful thinking. But there is a precedent: the global effort to regulate the tobacco industry.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Why Poor Students Struggle

Why Poor Students Struggle | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The price of success in college is often their own identities.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Joshua Matheny's comment, September 26, 2014 6:36 PM
Very interesting, adjustment seems to be the hardest battle for people in lower socioeconomic standings to balance out when faced with a whole new frontier that is college. Going to college at UAF was not even remotely a culture shock for me because I have grown up in the area. I cannot imagine the type of world let's say an Ivy-League college would show me. It would be really hard to acclimate and I may feel just the same way as some of these kids, unsure of my general direction. Money may only be able to buy you things physically, but it is definitely something that carries along with it a culture that will either teach you how to adapt and survive around it, or crumble like the children who have not been raised or acculturated by it.
Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 28, 2014 12:36 AM

My rebuttal to this article is that there are other factors that go into earning a college degree than financial aid or coming from a certain societal group. My husband and I got married at 18. Immediately after our wedding, we both started college life. We both hungered for an education, but were we poor? Absolutely! Have we struggled making it financially with not one but two of us paying our way for housing, books, tuition, general living? You bet. I think the most important key to our educational success has been that we are both motivated and driven.

biggamevince's comment, October 3, 2014 7:28 PM
People have been taught to go to school, get a degree, and find a good job. With today’s economy, it is difficult to find jobs. About 50 percent of graduates are hired for jobs that do not require a degree and/or move back home with their parents. Not to mention the large amount of student loans to pay back. The student loan debt is larger than the credit card debt. It is harder for poorer students to obtain financial aid and they are not guaranteed a job. If they stay home then they would have to deal with the disparity of living in a negative environment.
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How long to be a millionaire

How long to be a millionaire | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How long does it take to earn $1m in different countries?INFLATION may have ruined "How to marry a millionaire" as a good film title, but there is still something...
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For all you comparative folks...

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Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 28, 2014 12:16 AM

This is an interesting article. It would be helpful for the author to publish where the bulk of the statistics were taken. For example, what age range for earners in the US vs. Romania do they take into account, and how does the average earnings break down by the following categories: [18-24, 24-30, 30-44, 44-56, etc]?

 

Brandon Jensen's comment, October 1, 2014 3:04 AM
It is very interesting to see such a difference number of years from the top of the list to the bottom, I agree that it would also been nice to see a bit more information but it was pretty eye opening, I obviously knew it would take longer in different countries, but the specific amount of years they mentioned was pretty interesting.
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Right on!

Right on! | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FLYERS at petrol stations do not normally ask for someone to donate a kidney to an unrelated stranger. That such a poster, in a garage in Indiana, actually did...
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When I went in for my surgery, the lady next to me had flown in from the Mariana Islands to give a kidney to a friend--kind of put my surgery in perspective after that....

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Mandy Burris's comment, October 3, 2014 9:17 PM
This is very interesting to the biologist side of my brain. I think that it is fascinating that different people have different sized lobes of their brain that can be linked to certain behavior. I wonder how these developments will change how we diagnose and perceive mental instability and emotions.
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The Prevalence Of Criminology And Gang Culture In Muslim Communities - Episode 4 - YouTube

This episode of "The Mardiyah Show" tackles the prevalence of recidivism amongst many Muslims in the Islamic community. Upon release from prison, many Muslim...
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, September 22, 2014 8:16 PM

 In this video I heard the guest change the wording when he answered the first question that "whether you are Muslim or not Muslim" it is the small things that catch up with you later in life that we seem to ignore. I agree I believe that no matter who you are or what set of beliefs that are in your life everyone falls short of this at one time or another. To me gangs is culture because it is a set of beliefs that people come together on in a set of these beliefs. Muslims, Islamic groups and all of us have a set of behaviors that seem to follow that culture.

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BBC - Ethics - Abortion: Female infanticide

Infanticide is the unlawful killing of very young children. It is found in both indigenous and sophisticated cultures around the world.
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