Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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Could Bees Be Addicted to Pesticides? : DNews

Could Bees Be Addicted to Pesticides? : DNews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Like nicotine for humans, certain pesticides seem to hold an addictive attraction for bees, which seek out tainted food even if it may be bad for them, according to new research.

Not only did bees show no signs of avoiding neonicotinoid-laced food in lab tests, they seemed to prefer it, said a study in the journal Nature.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's an example of the complicated nature of white collar and green collar crime.  Is this a crime?  If so, who's responsible?  It's difficult to tell in these situations.

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How Baby Boomers Get High

How Baby Boomers Get High | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Reports over the past decade have detailed higher rates of illicit drug use, drug-related hospital admissions and overdoses among baby boomers in their later years than previous generations. A Wall Street Journal article last month described a “Woodstock mentality” that’s causing aging Americans to carry their youthful drug habits with them into middle age. A look at the data shows that plenty of baby boomers drink and smoke pot. But a relatively small percentage consume drugs other than alcohol and marijuana. Our analysis further reveals that boomers who do use drugs, including alcohol and marijuana, tend to use a lot.
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Brix Hahn's comment, April 24, 2015 7:02 AM
You know, this graph really doesn’t surprise me considering the times Baby Boomers grew up in. I can see them having easy access to cannabis, but then also to prescription drugs, considering America is quite literally addicted to them. What did surprise me about the article was that, “50 to 64 have lower rates of drug use overall than their younger contemporaries.” I just didn’t expect there to be a gap that big between them and their offspring.
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, April 27, 2015 5:36 PM
To me it's weird to picture baby boomers getting high off of various drugs. Like the article said, to these people it is not about getting high, it is more about coping with chronic pain, loss, social isolation or the effects of aging on the brain. For people who are my age (22), they are still in that "partying" phase where they are just doing those drugs or consuming alcohol because it's about getting high or getting drunk.
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Robert Downey Walks Out of Interview After Being Asked About Jail and Drugs - NDTV Movies

Robert Downey Walks Out of Interview After Being Asked About Jail and Drugs - NDTV Movies | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"Are we promoting a movie?," he asked, later saying it was getting "a little Diane Sawyer"
Rob Duke's insight:

A nice contrast between England and U.S. media: U.S. is extremely forgiving of past indiscretions....  Is this journalistic shaming a one-off or characteristic of Britain's media and, perhaps, culture?

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Mark Stoller's comment, May 8, 2015 3:15 AM
This is a tough one, is it wrong for a journalist to dig up old topics that are clearly trying to be forgotten or is it okay because their doing their job? I feel it would be more appropriate to ask the person or person’s in advance.
James Greer's comment, May 11, 2015 4:49 AM
I feel like it would be better to let the past lie, unless it has something immediately relevant to an ongoing current discussion. If the person asks you to drop it -- you drop it. Although I would say that from what I've seen of British comedians, their culture may just be more blunt and abrasive than what we're used to over here. Even though I laugh at their humor, I have to admit that a lot of the time it seems to be the kind of humor that requires you to examine your deepest flaws -- making fun of Americans for their guns (and not in a haha way, but in a very dark humor way) or how they treated blacks in the 50's - 70's; and so on.
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True Stories of Life on the Dole: Poverty From State to State

True Stories of Life on the Dole: Poverty From State to State | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
More than one in four Americans—many of them employed—receive some type of government anti-poverty assistance. We are bringing you their stories. Today, seven different experiences from people in seven different states.
Rob Duke's insight:

This article illustrates the conflict perspective that we discussed.  One side suggests that folks abuse welfare while the other asserts that working poor can't survive without it.

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Learning to love 'lucha' in an L.A. 'Aztec Temple'

Learning to love 'lucha' in an L.A. 'Aztec Temple' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

 The company is hoping to revive interest in the lucha libre style of wrestling, a staple of Mexican culture that has often struggled to gain national prominence in the U.S. The group also wants to strengthen cultural pride among Boyle Heights' Mexican American residents, placing its "Aztec temple" where its luchadores take flight in a warehouse district just off the Los Angeles River.

Rob Duke's insight:

Here's an interesting cultural difference on a pastime that popular on both sides of the border.....

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Iowa Man Found Not Guilty of Sexually Abusing Wife With Alzheimer’s

Iowa Man Found Not Guilty of Sexually Abusing Wife With Alzheimer’s | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Henry Rayhons was accused of sexually abusing his wife in a nursing home after staff members told him she had become cognitively unable to give consent.
Rob Duke's insight:

He was charged with a felony that carried a 10-year sentence.  He and his wife had had a long and loving relationship prior to her having dementia.  What are your thoughts on the way we deal with aging?

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Brix Hahn's comment, April 24, 2015 7:05 AM
This article was so heartbreaking, no matter the outcome it’s an emotional case. I don’t condone having any sort of sexual relations with anyone who cannot give educated consent. I don’t think the man was right having relations with his wife who could not give appropriate consent, but I also don’t think he sexually assaulted her.
Maddie Davis's comment, May 6, 2015 6:57 AM
This is a very interesting case. I think it’s so sad and heartbreaking if you really think about it. It’s hard to say that the man was wrong by having relations with his wife knowing that she could not always give proper consent because they did have a great relationship and the caretakers even said she was always happy to see her husband. I just don’t think this man would ever sexually assault his wife.
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17 Best U.S. Cities for Hippies

17 Best U.S. Cities for Hippies | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
While some may think all the hippies have burned out or faded away, the truth is they're still out there, still busily making love, but not war. We here at
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Just for fun....

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Brix Hahn's comment, April 24, 2015 7:09 AM
I thought this article was very uplifting and fun. It was a nice change of pace for the course (no offense). I also really enjoyed that Eugene was top of the list (I went to the University of Oregon). I think this article just goes to show how peaceful and happy people can live if they chose to simple mind their own business and don’t hurt one another.
Maddie Davis's comment, May 6, 2015 7:08 AM
I really enjoyed reading this list haha. I knew just from the title that Washington and Oregon cities would be the top. Being born and raised in WA I can definitely say that this list is pretty accurate. I live only 30 minutes from Olympia and one of my good friends plays volleyball at Evergreen State College and she has told me all about it and how extremely liberal it is. The hippie culture has always been an interest of mine.
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The Economist (@theeconomist) • Instagram photos and videos

The Economist (@theeconomist) • Instagram photos and videos | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Official account for the current affairs publication, providing peeks behind the scenes, article updates and editor interviews.
Rob Duke's insight:

Lots of good life examples in this instagram account operated by the economist.

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The rainbow blushes: violence in South Africa

The rainbow blushes: violence in South Africa | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Memories in South Africa are evidently short. Two decades after apartheid ended—partly thanks to a global campaign to isolate its racist regime—the country again risks international disgrace on account of prejudice, this time in the form of brutal attacks on immigrants from other African countries. Yesterday the government called in the army to quell anti-foreigner violence in townships just a few miles from wealthy suburbs of Johannesburg, as well as in parts of KwaZulu Natal in eastern South A
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A very British business

A very British business | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THEY are known, quaintly, as “public schools”, though they are certainly not open to just anyone. Their names—Eton, Winchester, Harrow, Fettes—conjure up...
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REPORT: EMCDDA | Treatment of cannabis-related disorders in Europe

REPORT: EMCDDA | Treatment of cannabis-related disorders in Europe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

While most of those receiving treatment for cannabis-related problems
are treated in outpatient settings, treatment in inpatient settings is also reported by the majority of countries. Given the young age and often limited level of problems experienced by many cannabis users, Internet-based interventions are a promising approach which is already supported by some evidence.
Addressing shortcomings and limitations will help to increase the overall availability and quality of treatment for cannabis use disorders in Europe, which may reduce the potential long-term negative effects in this relatively young group of drug users. The high levels of cannabis use in some parts of Europe, coupled with growing challenges to the drug’s status as a controlled substance and possible shifts in the social acceptability of the drug, underline the importance of meeting current treatment needs and remaining vigilant for future changes.


Via Julian Buchanan, Jocelyn Stoller
Rob Duke's insight:

A look at how things are done across the "pond"...

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Auschwitz guard admits 'moral guilt'

Auschwitz guard admits 'moral guilt' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Former SS officer has told a court he kept watch as Jewish people were led to gas chambers at Auschwitz.
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Maddie Davis's comment, May 6, 2015 7:19 AM
It’s incredibly sad to hear from an actual guard about his experiences back in 1942-1944. It still just blows my mind and disturbs me to think about what they did. I’m glad that he feels guilty for this and I’m sure he’s been feeling this for his entire life. It must’ve been hard to live with that guilt for so many years, I can’t imagine. This was a very good article to read.
James Greer's comment, May 11, 2015 4:58 AM
I think it's terrible what happened; and he acknowledges how terrible he feels. I can't imagine what it was like to live with this his entire life, and I can acknowledge the courage it takes to essentially end your own life in order to tell the truth. I don't fault him for waiting so long -- it was a very difficult time for Germans, not to down-play the horrors that victims of the camps experienced. He requested a transfer -- unless he successfully ran away, he'd have likely been shot for trying to desert or help any of the prisoners. Humans are good creatures at heart, in my mind, but they still have a flight or fight response, and very few people would be willing to throw their lives away in order to save complete strangers. A lot of people have over the history of man, and many more will in the future -- but I can't begrudge the people who don't possess that beyond-measure courage and love for man.
James Greer's comment, May 11, 2015 4:59 AM
I don't think he should be charged with anything; while it might seem like a cop-out, he's been punished more than enough just by the guilty and shame of what he participated in, that there's nothing a prison could possibly do to further change him. And if justice IS for rehabilitation -- what could this possibly do to make him a better current member of society?
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Help! I “Played Doctor” as a Kid, but My Fiancée Thinks It Was Abuse.

Help! I “Played Doctor” as a Kid, but My Fiancée Thinks It Was Abuse. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Emily Yoffe, aka Dear Prudence, is online weekly to chat live with readers. An edited transcript of the chat is below. (Sign up here to get Dear Prudence delivered to your inbox each week. Read Prudie’s Slate columns here. Send questions to Prudence at prudence@slate.com.) Q. How Do You Stop...
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Meagan Olsen's comment, April 21, 2015 11:40 PM
This article is interesting because as kids we all “played doctor” and it was a normal thing to do as a child, however this woman’s fiancé’ seems to think that she was abused. This could very well have happened and “playing doctor” could easily be used to cover it up or justify it to young kids but I could see how it could get out of hand.
Rob Duke's comment, April 22, 2015 12:20 AM
I've been on a few calls where parents were wanting a 5 year old suspect arrested for this.... It can sometimes indicate that one of the kids was molested, but often it's just innocent curiosity.
Robert M. Purcell's comment, April 27, 2015 12:58 AM
I am declining to comment on the remainder of the post here, but the first segment of question and answer really caught my attention. How do we define the line between abuse and normal childhood exploration? It seems fairly normal that boys and girls growing up together will eventually explore the differences between each other. Hey you have this and I don’t. I also understand how certain religions or other groups may severely look down upon such typical childhood activity. There are definitely signs that we can look for. Children tend to act out if they have been traumatized. You may not have a clue why, and it may be totally unrelated, but they do act out. Children will also tend to exhibit sexually reactive behaviors. I think Carrie’s fears in this case seem pretty unfounded. It’s also a telltale sign when the children are different ages. Normally an older child will be the abuser of the younger child (probably because they were abused themselves). It’s fairly unusual for two kids of an age, and mentally similar in age as well, to have actual sexual abuse going on between them at a young age.
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Portugal's Police Under Fire for Racism

Portugal's Police Under Fire for Racism | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Four separate investigations are underway into what happened. Both the Interior Ministry and Portugal's racial discrimination commission are investigating the conduct of the police.
Rob Duke's insight:

Held up as an example of good drug policy, here's another angle on this Country's police....

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Technology Sector as microcosm to illustrate aspects of Critical Theory

Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. INTERNATIONAL Business Machines (IBM) must rank as a case study in corporate...
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a great graphic to illustrate the functionalist vs. the instrumentalist views of critical theory.  If in fact the power brokers in the system use the system to maintain control, wouldn't we expect IBM to still be "in control"?  But that's not the case, companies have their day and then recede in importance.  Just as we had railroads and robber barons, which gave way to the progressive era, we continue to have different sectors in command.  This seems to support the functional perspective that the system seems to have some element or ability to sustain itself.  Winners and losers change to the extent that they help stabilize the system.

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Attorney: Full Tsarnaev cell video could cause backlash

Attorney: Full Tsarnaev cell video could cause backlash | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Showing jurors a courthouse cell video of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev fixing his hair and flashing both a V sign and his middle finger at the camera could backfire on the defense, one court watcher said.“One has to wonder if there won’t be some serious backlash to that decision. Ordinarily, the defense would move to suppress something like this. It’s almost incomprehensible,” said attorney Geoffrey Nathan, who is not associated with the case.
Rob Duke's insight:

Hmmm....seems like a questionable strategy, but it may give Tsarnaev an argument that he had inadequate representation?

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How the Alleged Paris Terror Plot Was Thwarted

How the Alleged Paris Terror Plot Was Thwarted | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An ensuing search of his apartment revealed more weapons and unspecified evidence linking him to religious extremism, officials said.

"Documents were also found and they prove, without any ambiguity, that the individual was preparing an imminent attack, in all probability, against one or two churches," French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said.
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Attack on French church foiled after Islamist shoots self in leg

Attack on French church foiled after Islamist shoots self in leg | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
France said Wednesday it had foiled a jihadist plot to attack a church after an Algerian who accidentally shot himself was found with a stash of weapons and documents mentioning Islamist militant groups.

The 24-year-old IT student Sid Ahmed Ghlam’s plans were exposed purely by chance after he called an ambulance saying he had been shot during an armed robbery at his Paris home, prosecutor Francois Molins told journalists.

However, police uncovered an arsenal of weapons in his car and home, and detailed plans to attack one of two churches, as well as DNA evidence linking him to the murder of a woman who was found shot dead in her car over the weekend near the capital.
Rob Duke's insight:

So, here's a great example of how the Inquisitorial, or Civil Law System, works....

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California’s approach to crime is costly and shortchanges victims

California’s approach to crime is costly and shortchanges victims | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This endless cycle of incarceration is largely driven by mental health and drug addiction issues that continue to be punished instead of healed. This is exactly what happened with the man who shot my husband.
Rob Duke's insight:

Fallen officer's wife has some observations about the offender-centric system....

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Cops and rockers

Cops and rockers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Busking has not been a crime on New York city’s streets since 1970. In 1985 a New York court ruled that banning subway music was unconstitutional, too. Yet some police still think buskers need a permit.
Rob Duke's insight:

Busking....I learned a new word.

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A millennium-old argument

A millennium-old argument | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A THOUSAND years ago, Baghdad presented a extraordinary scene: a city of a million people, the centre of a Muslim realm which stretched from Spain to Central Asia,...
Rob Duke's insight:

For the comparative folks, here's an interesting background article for how the middle east views interpretation of older writings....

 

For today's anti-Islamic polemicists, the next page in the story is a simple one: the Christian West accepted Aristotle, and therefore became enlightened and progressive; the Muslims rejected Aristotle and therefore sank into the mire. But that is just too simple. Today's understanding of space, time and the emergence of the universe is at least as far removed from Aristotle's static cosmological system as it is from any religious narrative; sticking too closely to that system can easily become a form of dogmatism in the worst sense. When the medieval Catholic church was persecuting Galileo and Copernicus, it was doing so in the name of an Aristotelian view of the universe. So accepting Aristotle certainly didn't make the medieval Vatican into a paragon of reason and tolerance.

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James Greer's comment, May 11, 2015 4:53 AM
I would say that accepting Aristotle doesn't itself solve some global problem of refusing to change or being averse to criticism or what have you. What accepting Aristotle would indicate, in this regard, is that the Christian West is WILLING to change when it seems acceptable. In contrast, Islamic practitioners seem to wholly reject any form of outside change or criticism outright, as full-on blasphemy. If you don't even consider a different view-point from your own, you have no hope of changing. The first step in healing is to admit there's a problem; you have to be able to admit you might not be perfect/have all the answer.
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Arvin Kangas testifies at evidence tampering trial: 'I was disgusted'

Arvin Kangas testifies at evidence tampering trial: 'I was disgusted' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — The man accused of evidence tampering in the aftermath of last year’s shooting death of two Alaska State Troopers took the stand in a Nenana courtroom Tuesday.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, April 23, 2015 1:08 AM
I think it is crazy that he is trying to say he has no memory of it happening and of the shooting…I don’t think that is going to hold up well especially because it is the troopers case and this is being taken seriously then most cases probably. I didn’t know that the trooper’s tape recorders taped 11 hours after they were dead and they could hear what they were saying. It is just wrong that Kangas said, “the way I’m thinking about it is looking at, like two dead dogs that were shot.” I think that is so messed up and I hope he goes to jail.
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Impact of Regulation: Will Wonga and other payday lenders survive?

Impact of Regulation: Will Wonga and other payday lenders survive? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A stricter regulatory regime has hit the profits and business of some payday lenders, so will they survive?

Via Matt Smith
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Matt Smith's curator insight, April 22, 2015 7:15 AM

A very good article that shows how govt intervention in the Payday loans market has reduced the number of lenders and their profits. Possible Govt Failure as where will some people now go for loans?

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Marijuana smokers may be cited for disturbing the peace in Fairbanks

Marijuana smokers may be cited for disturbing the peace in Fairbanks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Disturbing the peace with marijuana smoke will be a punishable offense in the city of Fairbanks starting Saturday.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, April 23, 2015 2:16 AM
I was kind of pleased to see that disturbing the peace with marijuana smoke will be a punishable offence in Fairbanks. This is nice because not everyone enjoys the smell of it and just because it is legal doesn’t mean it should be allowed everywhere. It is punishable by a $100 fine, which I think is reasonable, and a great idea. Another considerate thing is that the person will receive a warning before getting fined, etc. to know that they are disturbing the peace with it, which gives them a chance to move and stop, maybe they didn’t realize that it was bothering those around them.
Rob Duke's comment, April 23, 2015 7:22 PM
I'm hoping that we keep all of these as regulations and citations. I hate to see pressure to keep MJ underground where cartels and gangs hold sway. I do agree that we still should make sure that MJ is used in the appropriate time, place, and manner.
Robert M. Purcell's comment, April 27, 2015 1:06 AM
I had to read through this article twice before I really understood what the ordinance seems to be saying. If I understand correctly, for a person to be punished for the offense of ‘disturbing the peace through marijuana smoke’, they would have to first receive an official warning by a police officer, and then refuse to quit whatever smoking conduct they were engaged in. I think if this is to be the case, they would have to have some kind of issuable warning or a card similar to the Miranda rights, so that an officer can give a specific warning regarding the offensive nature of the smoking. Otherwise, we leave ourselves open to a whole slew of interpretations on what constitutes a warning by the police. This isn’t exactly something that people usually consider until it has gone to court at least once, but I’m of the mind that a more proactive plan would make a lot more sense than waiting to react and spending taxpayer money. I’m not against the ordinance as it seems to read.
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Charges dropped for grieving dad arrested on bridge where...

Charges dropped for grieving dad arrested on bridge where... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Charges have been dropped against the father who tried to build a barricade at the Georgia bridge where his teenage daughter and her boyfriend died, the District Attorney said Tuesday.
Rob Duke's insight:

Would dispute resolution been a better tool in this case than arrest?

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Meagan Olsen's comment, April 22, 2015 4:31 AM
This was fair thinking by this dad I would say, he was just trying to help and make a difference because the state wasn’t doing anything to make the bridge that his daughter died on any safer. He wasn’t doing anything wrong in my opinion but the reason he was arrested makes sense, even though it seems ethical! I can see where he was coming from
Rob Duke's comment, April 22, 2015 4:36 AM
Yeah, I think we need to be searching for reasonableness and a little human dignity.
Mark Stoller's comment, May 8, 2015 3:29 AM
I am happy that the charges were dropped because it was a ridiculous arrest, the man was just trying to help prevent another tragedy. It was actually better he got arrested then the city finally did something.