Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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3-D Digital Forensic Analysis Confirms Lee Harvey Oswald Photo

3-D Digital Forensic Analysis Confirms Lee Harvey Oswald Photo | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Oswald is standing in an American backyard, with stark shadows thrown in the black-and-white background. The rifle is the same model that would shortly be used to kill the President of the United States of America.
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Executions in Iran could top 1,000 in 2015, says UN

Executions in Iran could top 1,000 in 2015, says UN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Tehran executes more individuals per capita than any other country, official reports, with number rising at ‘exponential rate’

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Jay Fulk's comment, October 29, 2015 1:57 PM
Iran is the poster child of the world of what not to be. That country's government is an abomination. I'm not against the death penalty, but I can say that I am against executing drug offenders. That's simply insane to me. While I understand the negative repercussions that come from drugs, you cannot simply hang a person for a drug offense. I think the only time a death sentence is warranted is when there is a taking of life intentionally. Simple as that.
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Black travelers used the ‘Green Book’ to avoid racist towns and businesses in the Jim Crow era

Black travelers used the ‘Green Book’ to avoid racist towns and businesses in the Jim Crow era | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Victor Green, a U.S. Postal Service worker, started publishing the books from his New York City Apartment after his wife decided they should scout all the black-friendly businesses on the way to visit her family in Virginia.

“The idea crystallized when, not only himself but several friends and acquaintances complained of the difficulties encountered; oftentimes painful embarrassments suffered which ruined a vacation or business trip,” wrote Novera C. Dashiell in the spring 1956 edition.
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A Sex Therapist Explains What Terrible Things Can Happen if You Like Sex Too Much | VICE | United States

I spoke to Tim Lee of New York Pathways about bad relationships, how abuse can lead to compulsive behavior, and why the term "sex addict" sucks.
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Landmark Case in Mexico's Supreme Court Could Pave the Way for Marijuana Legalization

Landmark Case in Mexico's Supreme Court Could Pave the Way for Marijuana Legalization | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
On Wednesday, Mexico’s Supreme Court will debate whether the prohibition of the consumption and cultivation of marijuana for personal use is unconstitutional. The Court will determine whether the prohibition of the consumption of marijuana – and its cultivation for non-commercial ends – violates the human right to the free development of one’s personality. This landmark case could lead to the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes if followed up with legislation.
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Orion Hutchin's comment, October 31, 2015 8:52 PM
I find it surprising it would take them this long to make marijuana legislation. One would think that they would want to try to allow this drug or legalize it to use it as a product to export legally to the U.S. Marijuana is at too high of demand to stop the use of it.
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Elderly man charged over dog's death: Dog's family not happy with RJ process

An elderly man has been charged with poisoning a pet dog.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's a case from New Zealand where the family is not happy with the outcome.  Should RJ be withheld when the victims don't want it?

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Orion Hutchin's comment, October 31, 2015 8:26 PM
I think in this specific case that the victims should have been able to reject the option of restorative justice. I am not sure how this counts a restorative justice when the victims do not feel some sort of satisfaction or repair. This seems like a case were an older individual got away with an act, because who wants to charge an 83 man in this case? How about a civil suit? Unfortunately the man is quite old and the trail would probably have to proceed swiftly before he passes if they hope to get some punitive damages. Either way the victim was not the priority in this case, the offender was it would appear.
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Under Prop. 47, former felons find themselves shedding a stifling label

Under Prop. 47, former felons find themselves shedding a stifling label | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Susan Burton knows what the first day out of jail can feel like.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's the other side of Prop. 47.

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California's Prop. 47 revolution: Voters were sold a bill of goods

California's Prop. 47 revolution: Voters were sold a bill of goods | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As crime rates rise, Californians are realizing that they were sold a bill of goods on Proposition 47, the 2014 ballot measure that converted some felonies to misdemeanors. The campaign spin was all about reducing the punishment for drug possession. But proponents played down its dramatic softening of penalties for many non-drug offenses.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's what happens when policy is poorly implemented.  Institutional change is not enough, there must also be funding to disrupt the underground economy in other ways; there must be funding for addiction and other forms of treatment (anger management, etc.); and there must be funding for re-entry.

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Sovereign citizen training for LE

Sovereign citizen training for LE | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Fla. sheriff's office has released a video on sovereign citizens and how to safely police them.
Rob Duke's insight:

1. Disconnect;

2. Call for backup and a supervisor;

3. Document every encounter; and, share those with surrounding law enforcement.

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Worse than malaria

Worse than malaria | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Africa’s roads are the world’s deadliest for a multitude of reasons including lax enforcement of traffic rules (much of that due to rampant corruption), poor road conditions, lack of pedestrian infrastructure such as pavements and crossings, and dismal accident and emergency care. Not to mention the cars themselves; all African countries except South Africa meet either none or just one of the UN’s seven main vehicle safety standards.
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World Religion Map

World Religion Map | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The incredibly detailed map of the world's religions shows what the biggest religion is by census area in each country, along with its level of support.

Via Seth Dixon
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Madison Roth's curator insight, April 7, 12:47 PM
This map relates to my human geography class because it shows the distribution of religion, and that is something my class is learning about. I think the distribution of religion is interesting to view because of the enormous level of diversity. Comparing the spread from origins of different religions to one another, the size along with the support it receives are even more actions one would practice.
Chris Rouse's curator insight, April 11, 4:34 PM
This article is about the different religions around the world and what areas have the largest amount of supporters for a certain religion. This connects to our lessons because we learned about the different religions and where they are located.
Aaron Evans's curator insight, April 25, 9:27 PM
There are many religions throughout the world. And it is interesting to see where the religions are distributed throughout regions. Christian is the biggest religion in the world, I was surprised to see the tiny bits of christian in Asia. It is an overall very detailed map.
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McDonald’s “New Policy” Bans Customers From Buying Food For Homeless

McDonald’s “New Policy” Bans Customers From Buying Food For Homeless | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A number of stories have recently come to light, showing that McDonalds allegedly has a new policy which is preventing customers from buying food for homeless people.

Via britishroses
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Brittney Menzel's comment, October 27, 2015 1:23 AM
I find this disturbing on so many levels. It is rather disgusting. Judging a book by it's cover, turning away money, and we live in America right? Why does McDonald's care if their customers have a roof over their head or not?
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Robber barons, beware

Robber barons, beware | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As Mr Xi’s purge expands, the anxieties of some businessmen are growing. Hurun Report, a rich list, shows there are now more dollar billionaires in China (596) than in the United States (537). According to its research, carried out after this summer’s stockmarket plunge and currency devaluation, China added 242 of its billionaires just this year. Some of these fortunes were earned honestly, but some surely were not. A Chinese property tycoon (who has not been accused of wrongdoing) says many fellow billionaires are akin to corrupt robber barons in America over a century ago.
Rob Duke's insight:

As we remove the ability to cheat, more freedom develops.

 

See Gordon Tullock's hypothesis that predicted the rise of the Industrial Revolution as a direct result of the Glorious Revolution of 1688.  By reorganizing the relationship between the wealthy and the monarchy, a more fair set of institutions enabled the efficiency of the industrialization to develop.

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Noam Chomsky opines that we do not live under capitalism.


Via jean lievens
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Employers Can't Ask About Criminal Background on Job Applications Anymore

Employers Can't Ask About Criminal Background on Job Applications Anymore | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Fair Chance Act makes it illegal to ask job applicants about their criminal history before an offer.

Via Doingtime2
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Doingtime2's curator insight, October 29, 2015 6:37 AM
 NEW YORK CITY — New York's civil rights organizations celebrated Tuesday as a new piece of legislation took effect, limiting when employers in New York City can ask job applicants about their criminal pasts.

The Fair Chance Act, which was signed into law by Mayor Bill de Blasio on June 29 and went into effect Oct. 27, makes it unlawful for employers to ask job seekers about their criminal records prior to making a conditional offer of employment.

After a job offer has been made, the employer has the right to inquire about the applicant's criminal history. If the job offer is retracted, the employer has to supply the applicant with a written explanation as well as a copy of any background checks. The employer also needs to keep the position open for three days after supplying the material, to give the applicant a fair chance to respond.

A 2004 Harvard study found that job applicants who declared criminal convictions when applying for jobs were about 50 percent less likely to get a callback than those who didn't.

"This is huge," said Brandon J. Holmes, civil rights organizer at the community organization VOCAL-NY.

"This is a monumental piece of legislation in New York City. This is some of the strictest fair chance/ban-the-box legislation anywhere in the United States," Holmes told DNAinfo New York.

Paul Samuels, president of the Legal Action Network, called the bill "a big step forward," but cautioned that "there is still work to be done in New York and throughout the country," mentioning access to housing and health care among remaining barriers to the formerly incarcerated.

A rally was held Tuesday in front of Brooklyn's Atlantic Terminal where activists from VOCAL-NY, the Fortune Society, and other civil rights groups celebrated the law going into effect, organizers said.

Jay Fulk's comment, October 29, 2015 2:13 PM
I'm not sure how I feel about this. As an employer, you want the ability to choose the very best candidate. I also see the point because there are a lot of people in the United States that have something on their records, but it doesn't truly indicate who they are. A lot of people screw up once and learn from that mistake, but they have a tougher time getting jobs due to that mistake. Should it be that way? I think more often than not, yes it probably should be that way. I can't help but wonder if this will create the increase in other cities doing the same thing.
Orion Hutchin's comment, October 31, 2015 8:15 PM
I agree with you Jay. I can see the reason for allowing people equal opportunities, however as an employee one wants to gain a full picture of who they are dealing with. Criminal records do say something about individuals even if it does not define them completely. In this day an age hiring people is very important because of how often a persons actions can lead to a lawsuit in the U.S. I would want to know if I have a convicted felony applying for my job to determine if the person is worth the risk. If it was twenty years ago then maybe, however a year or several months I might think twice about that person's character and my businesses reputation, liability, and image.
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Airbnb Really Pissed People Off in San Francisco with These Tone-Deaf Ads | VICE News

The do-it-yourself home rental site Airbnb just pulled the plug on a controversial ad campaign in San Francisco that bragged about the amount of taxes the $1.5 billion company paid to the city.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's a great example of "convergence" and "co-generation" of value.  The City of San Francisco, like many cities hasn't found ways of including the companies it taxes in the decisions about why the tax is needed (bringing temporary residents to the City creates demand for services, which the visitor should pay for) and what the funds should be used for (probably not libraries since visitors aren't known for running off to the library).  In one City I managed, we created a committee that directed the funds.  While we kept some for public safety and public works, we also gave a large portion (15-20%) back to promote our community to tourists.  We made the pie bigger, so to speak, which made most of our innkeepers more accepting of the need for the tax.  Did we please everyone? No.  But, we increased the size of the network, which set a better agenda.

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The Economist Films - where image is the final word

The Economist offers authoritative insight and opinion on international news, politics, business, finance, science, technology and the connections between them.
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RJ Week 2015: Call for case studies | Restorative Justice for All

This year, RJ4All is celebrating the RJ week by collecting innovative practical cases on RJ which will be disseminated through our website and social media.
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'Restorative justice' catching on with police departments local & abroad

'Restorative justice' catching on with police departments local & abroad | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The idea is to understand and treat the underlying issues that often lead to crime. For instance, one of the group's goals is to increase alternatives to arrest, like mental health care and drug treatment.
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Jay Fulk's comment, October 29, 2015 2:44 PM
I'm a huge fan of restorative justice because I think that it works! We already incarcerate the most people per capita in the entire free world, and it's obviously not fixing our crime problem. So, when something is not working then you must come up with alternatives to help solve the problem at hand. I truly believe that restorative justice can help a first time offender never offend again. For example, if you take an 18 year old kid and sentence him to 2 years in prison for theft of a computer at school, the chances of him recidivating are high. If restorative justice is pursued for him, he will be able to see the total impacts that his behavior had on everyone involved. He'll pay restitution and make it right by some other means than sitting in a jail cell being unproductive. Obviously restorative justice is a case by case basis, but I think that it needs to be used in every single city and state in the country.
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Like Prohibition, the fight over guns is about something else

Like Prohibition, the fight over guns is about something else | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A quarter-century ago, while casting about for a dissertation topic, I decided I wanted to write about alcohol prohibition. In a nation of so many drinkers, banning booze was obviously futile. So why did we try so hard to do it?
Rob Duke's insight:

Circumlocution is pretty common in public policy debate.  We use a popular issue to influence an obscure or unpopular issue in a round-about way....

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This animated map shows how religion spread across the world

This animated map shows how religion spread across the world | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.
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You know you live in Alaska when...

You know you live in Alaska when... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How do you know when you're really an Alaskan? Here are just a few possible signs.
Rob Duke's insight:

You could almost write a "good life" skit from this article....

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Time off for bad prose

Time off for bad prose | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE makers of the Romanian edition of the board game Monopoly may want to consider altering the “Get out of jail free” card to one reading “Wrote a book in jail”. A change in the law in 2013 allows convicts to claim 30 days off their sentences for every work they publish while in prison. This has led Romanian tycoons and politicians imprisoned on corruption charges to indulge in a frenzy of scribbling. It is a system as corrupt as they are.

Among those who have taken advantage of the loophole, or hope to do so, are Adrian Nastase, a former prime minister; Gheorghe Copos, a businessman and former government minister; Gigi Becali, another tycoon-cum-politician; and Ioan Niculae, reputedly the richest person in Romania. Gica Popescu, a former star footballer convicted of money laundering, is on the verge of early release after penning no fewer than four titles. Other hopeful authors include bigwigs in sports management and yet more politicians.
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How Chicago became the country's alley capital

How Chicago became the country's alley capital | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

How Chicago became the alley capital of the country and why so much of the rest of the region is conspicuously alley-free.


Via Ken Feltman
Rob Duke's insight:

The Shadow City....

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