Criminology and E...
Follow
Find
8.1K views | +6 today
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How FBI caught Ross Ulbricht, alleged creator of criminal marketplace Silk Road

How FBI caught Ross Ulbricht, alleged creator of criminal marketplace Silk Road | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The FBI traced the man accused of running Silk Road -- the Internet's most extensive criminal marketplace -- after he allegedly posted his Gmail address online.
Rob Duke's insight:

More on the big bad wolf living in the forest behind your house: the Dread Pirate Roberts and the illegal goods Amazon.com (the silk road) and other similar web-pirates.

more...
Joshua Matheny's comment, October 4, 2013 3:04 PM
This is really interesting, almost kind of like something you would see on a tv show. I did some research into the deep web at work at UAFPD with some of the other officers who were interested in it. Not sure why they call it the dark web, I guess it is known from a few different aliases. The web provides a deep untapped market where people can easily log in to find the services and items they need or request they would not so easily look for in the physical world. It is just like an illegal amazon.com. Bitcoin is gaining extreme popularity in how anonymous it can be transported and used. We may see a jump in popularity of this kind of currency in the future as more and more we are getting technical in this type of transaction, that is online and expedient.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

State bar association, local probation officers anticipate big changes as LB 561 goes into effect - The Sidney Sun-Telegraph

State bar association, local probation officers anticipate big changes as LB 561 goes into effect - The Sidney Sun-Telegraph | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Nebraska State Bar Association hopes that changes to the juvenile justice system in this state will lead youth toward more positive actions
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Plea deal expected in Florida high school sex crime case - WHTC

Plea deal expected in Florida high school sex crime case - WHTC | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Plea deal expected in Florida high school sex crime case WHTC ORLANDO, Florida (Reuters) - A Florida high-school student charged in February with a felony sex crime over her affair with a younger girl was expected to accept a plea deal on Thursday...
more...
Joshua Matheny's comment, October 4, 2013 3:08 PM
What I appreciate about this is that they are not letting the sexual-orientation deter from the crimes committed. It seems they are actually looking to seek justice in the extent of the law in Florida and that is no one 18 and older is to engage in sexual activity with a minor. Although the offender is young, the crime committed is still illegal and they should have been fully aware of that. A fourteen year old is still a very young child who is impressionable. Although Hunt was young too she should have seen the error in her ways.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Greenpeace piracy case sees Canadian Alexandre Paul charged

Greenpeace piracy case sees Canadian Alexandre Paul charged | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Canadian crew member Alexandre Paul is now among those charged by Russia after its coast guard seized a Greenpeace ship carrying 30 people from 18 countries following a Sept.
more...
John Philip Tilden's comment, October 3, 2013 10:14 PM
I think that the Russian government was totally justified in arresting the Greenpeace members, though I do not agree with charging them with piracy. Greenpeace members had no right to board and oil rigs, even if they wanted to protest. That is still private property, and should have been treated as trespassers not pirates. I think that the Russian government should look at the intent of the Greenpeace members, as it was clearly not to steel or have a hostile take over as true pirates would.
Rob Duke's comment, October 3, 2013 10:24 PM
It's a difficult situation. There's no real place to protest ocean drilling (or whaling), so it's difficult to completely castigate Greenpeace. On the other hand, if we let Greenpeace board oil rigs, what's to prevent real pirates or terrorists from posing as Greenpeace?
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Biker involved in SUV chase in New York may be paralyzed, wife says | Toronto Star

Biker involved in SUV chase in New York may be paralyzed, wife says | Toronto Star | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
One of the bikers involved in chasing a family in a Range Rover SUV in New York suffered broken legs and spine injuries, according to his wife, and may never walk again.
more...
Zach White's comment, October 2, 2013 3:03 PM
A pack of idiots on crotch rockets versus a man in a SUV trying to defend his wife and daughter... How could this have not ended badly. The biker should count himself lucky he wasn't killed.
Ricky Osborne's comment, October 3, 2013 8:01 PM
This goes to show that ones environment can affect criminal behavior. All of the bikers were riding together quite rowdily. Due to this an environment of hostility and aggression was created as can be seen by the outcome of the event. The victims of this aggression was the family in the SUV who were in the wrong place at the wrong time. The criminals acts were initiated by one and soon followed by others.
Joshua Matheny's comment, October 4, 2013 3:13 PM
I saw this earlier this week when I found the video on liveleak. This is extremely offensive to me in the fact that mob mentality totally overpowered reasoning and rationality based on the events that happened. You can see earlier in the video that the SUV driver was break checked by a biker whom he hit at a slow rate of speed probably without being able to fully stop. Surrounded on numerous occasions and fearing for the safety of his wife and child I feel I may have done the same thing the driver would have done and that is try to flee the scene of the crime. You can also see in the video after he hits the biker someone is trying to get into his car door which alerts him to run over the bikers in front of him, this happens twice before his window is caved in. The SUV driver is COMPLETELY the victim.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Solano County restorative justice effort underway

Solano County restorative justice effort underway | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Advocates of a process aimed at not just at holding offenders accountable, but giving victims a sense of justice beyond sentencing and incarceration, are ramping up efforts to do just that.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Gang of bikers attack driver in front of family after high-speed chase

Gang of bikers attack driver in front of family after high-speed chase | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An unidentified 30-year-old man was attacked in front of his wife in child in New York City after his vehicle was pursued by a gang of motorcyclists in a high speed chase.
more...
Lacy Church's comment, October 2, 2013 4:55 PM
The writing of the article in the beginning almost makes the SUV driver sound like the perpetrator as if the SUV driver was the one that was not driving properly with bikes on the road. It is not uncommon for bikers to band together and ride as large groups so they may not have been immediately suspected as a gang. By the end of the article it established for me that the biker gang was clearly out looking for and causing trouble around the city. Hopefully some of them caught in Times Square were also those involved in the SUV incident. It is very sad that this builds on the stereotypes of bikers being bad guys. I hope the man recovers and his family gets some counseling especially the kiddo. Thankfully there is video at all that they can hopefully identify some of the bikers.
Jarvis Johnson's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:24 PM

One of the primary causes of ongoing gang membership and violence is because of ineffective responses to gang membership and violence by law enforcement and the criminal justice system. These social institutions are much more focused on retributive rather than restorative or rehabilitative justice. In many ways, the increase in gang membership and violent crime among Americans has caused politicians and fear-mongers to create harsh, retributive enforcement and incarceration penalties for males that offers little chance for rehabilitation.

Kelly Logue's comment, October 3, 2013 11:43 PM
This article was interesting not only because of the high intensity of a high speed chase through Mannhatten, NYC, but because I was confused for most of the article. As I was reading I was assuming that the motorcyclists were in fact trying to stop the SUV from escaping and I know this is what was said in the article. But I took it as the SUV was the perpatrator and the motorcycle gang was the hero. This of course then was switched around again at the very end when NYPD arrests the motorcycle gang.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why Scandinavian Prisons Are Superior

Why Scandinavian Prisons Are Superior | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
'Open' prisons, in which detainees are allowed to live like regular citizens, should be a model for the U.S.
more...
Kristie Major's comment, October 3, 2013 9:49 PM
I think that America would not be able to handle a prison system like with out taking a long time to implement. This process will take a long time to do because most people would not be very accepting of it. Look at the reaction of the couple in this article. They were shocked at the prisons in Scandinavia and feared for their safety. Prisons like this would not work in America with out changing the perspective of most Americans.
Rob Duke's comment, October 3, 2013 10:12 PM
It'd be interesting to try one of these somewhere in rural Alaska.
Christie Hampton's comment, October 6, 2013 9:56 PM
What struck me the most with this article is that the prisoners of the open prison held themselves responsible for the act which put them there. I think the biggest problem with the prison system is people not taking responsibility for their own actions. It may be that he or she does not consider his or her own actions as criminal even if the act was against the law. That is the only obstacle I see as standing in the way of this type of prison working in the states.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The architecture of justice | Insights | HiiL

The architecture of justice | Insights | HiiL | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The judiciary feels the need to modernise: innovative procedures, use of information technology and shifting roles of judges. A next step involves looking at designing the courthouses themselves.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

NYC inmate almost as costly as Ivy League tuition

NYC inmate almost as costly as Ivy League tuition | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:

That's a good bit of dough...

more...
Tessa Butterfield's comment, October 1, 2013 5:53 PM
Yes, that's insane amounts of money. But why are they spending the same amount of money if the numbers of inmates has gone down? Its crazy to think that 85 percent goes to the employees. There's got to be a better solution to this.
Ricky Osborne's comment, October 3, 2013 8:06 PM
This goes to show that crime is expensive. Not only are the costs of investigating and sentencing astronomical but also jailing. This is why ways of reducing crime and also finding cheaper more effective rehabilitation methods are important. This is another way crime affects society as a whole.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Federal Trial Over Gulf Oil Spill Resumes

The federal trial over the 2010 BP oil spill resumed Monday with a focus on the company's response to the disaster, with billions of dollars at stake as the two sides argue over how much oil spewed into the Gulf of Mexico.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Amanda Knox retrial over killing of Meredith Kercher begins in Italy

Amanda Knox retrial over killing of Meredith Kercher begins in Italy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The latest chapter in Amanda Knox's long legal battle begins Monday in Florence with a retrial over the 2007 killing of her British roommate Meredith Kercher
more...
Christie Hampton's comment, October 2, 2013 1:05 AM
I find watching the justice system of another country interesting to see in progress. I do wonder if the US would extradite her since this would be double jeopardy in our country. I don't think the US would want to upset the good will of another country by refusing, but it is against US law to be tried again. It seems in other countries (I'm thinking Canada) they can refuse extradition if the receiving country's laws are in direct conflict on the subject. (Can't think of a citation for that right now.) On a personal level, it is a horrible thing to have this crime, trial and possible punishment hanging over one's head. The uncertainty would be very stressful. We will have to watch and see!
Lacy Church's comment, October 2, 2013 4:09 PM
I agree with Christie, it's fascinating how other countries run their courts. On one side it reads that the Italian courts are just out to find a person to blame at any cost. On the other hand she seems totally guilty and lucky they haven't found the proof. I am wondering though after reading through a timeline of the events of this case if she was there but not actually the person that performed the murder. We obviously have different classifications for your level of involvement in a crime, I wonder if Italy has those classifications. They really don't seem to care about the involvment but more either you did it or did not. It would be really hard to make the decision as an accused person to return to the country or not.
BridgetM's comment, October 2, 2013 9:18 PM
I followed this case very closely when it was happening and have never believed she was guilty of murder (or at least guilty according to what was presented in court). The evidence is just not there. There are often these well-publicized cases where lawyers have pressure from the public to solve a case so they grasp at straws. This can give law enforcement and prosecutors tunnel vision and they stop following other leads all together. We saw this in the John Hartman case, and this case reminds me of that. Four years in prison and the thousands of dollars in legal bills she is responsible for is already quite the punishment, for not having enough evidence to convict in the first place. At least it goes to show we're not the only country wasting the government's time and resources!
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Elizabeth Warren On Justice Double Standards

Elizabeth Warren On Justice Double Standards | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Will Warren's goals come to fruition? Doubtful, but it's important that she's bringing the issue into the so-called hallowed halls of Congress.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is probably impossible, but funding restorative justice would apply more justice to the bottom end of the spectrum so that more justice was delivered.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Groups push restorative justice for LGBTQ youth - Windy City Times

Groups push restorative justice for LGBTQ youth - Windy City Times | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Groups push restorative justice for LGBTQ youth Windy City Times Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer ( LGBTQ ) students report experiencing ongoing bullying, harassment, and discrimination from other youth, teachers, and school...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A restorative way to minimize crime - Capitol Hill Times

A restorative way to minimize crime - Capitol Hill Times | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A restorative way to minimize crime Capitol Hill Times If both the perpetrator and the victim agree to the restorative practice rather than a criminal prosecution, the two will then engage in mediation to help address the needs of both parties with...
more...
Robert Tanner's comment, October 7, 2013 4:40 PM
I agree that something needs to be done with our current system or process when it comes to incarceration. I think what they are doing in Seattle is a good plan. However, I think the problem lies within our society and how it is shaping and changing. We used to be called a melting pot and now we are considered a salad. Instead of a group melding and working together, we are a diverse group separated by our backgrounds. This being said, we have to figure out to become one nation and live and work together. I want to note a flaw in the report: Cultural differences. Many of the countries they talk about in the report do not have the issue we have. They do not have open doors as we do, they have a longer history of working together
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

State seeks independent review of Hartman murder case

State seeks independent review of Hartman murder case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS - The Alaska Department of Law announced today it’s asking law enforcement to re-examine the 1997 Fairbanks murder of John Hartman.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Cost Per Cybercrime Victim Skyrockets

Cost Per Cybercrime Victim Skyrockets | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
While the number of people who have been victims of cybercrime was on the decline this year, the cost per victim is up 50 percent, according to a new report from Symantec.
Rob Duke's insight:

There's no uniform  strategy to go after these kind of criminals....

more...
Carlie Bailey's comment, October 3, 2013 8:59 PM
Cybercrime is the crime of the future. It is astonishing that even though the number of cybercrime victims has decreased, the cost per victim has increased by 50%. I am surprised that there are more cybercrime attacks in South Africa than there are in the United States. It is difficult to protect yourself from these attacks outside of security passwords and catching cybercrime offenders is also difficult.
Rob Duke's comment, October 3, 2013 10:20 PM
Yes, it's a bit like allowing the big bad wolf to live in the woods behind your house. We don't want to let the police monitor the internet, but we're shocked that the damage is so high and so prevalent. At least this is just property crime, the cyber predators that try to lure our kids, are another topic entirely.
Kelly Logue's comment, October 3, 2013 11:52 PM
This is interesting because first of all, I'm not surprised by the fact that overall, men develop more virus's than women do. I say this because men are more likely to use their computers to look up pornographic sites which allow your computer to have bugs added to their softwares that cause virus's. Also, my question here is, how do you go after people planting virus's? Where would you even start? Now that these bugs can be transmitted into your iphone is very unsettling, especially since, well in my life atleast, my iphone is one of the major things that can get me through the day without losing my mind! I was especially surprised that the other countries that were stated had the most attacks. You would think it would be America because of how technologically advanced we are. But I guess that means our softwares are also advanced.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

California Gov. Jerry Brown signs bill to outlaw 'revenge porn'

California Gov. Jerry Brown signs bill to outlaw 'revenge porn' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed bills that will ease the state's sale of potentially hundreds of surplus homes in Los Angeles County, outlaw an Internet trend known as "revenge porn" and help the state implement the Affordable...
Rob Duke's insight:

No more sending pix of one's ex to naughty websites....

more...
Zach White's comment, October 2, 2013 3:15 PM
As somebody who has participated in making many a cheating-ex "famous" I just wonder where this is heading.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

ANCHORAGE, Alaska: FBI: New information on serial killer yields tips | State News | ADN.com

ANCHORAGE, Alaska: FBI: New information on serial killer yields tips | State News | ADN.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The FBI says investigators are following up on tips about an Alaska serial killer that were prompted by new information released to the public.
more...
Michael McColley's comment, October 2, 2013 2:30 PM
I must say that I remember hearing about the Samantha Koenig case and now to hear that this guy may be linked to that and some other murders and homicides is just eary. I hope they find this guy soon and finally bring some justice for Samantha's family.
Haley Gagnon's comment, October 3, 2013 8:01 PM
I am curious as to why they aren't talking more to Keyes' girlfriend? I mean they could and that information just hasn't been made public knowledge. I have to also agree with Wyndam about the speculation of a wild goose chase since he only gave the information on the couple and Samantha Koenig. If he really did murder more people within 10 states I find that it will be much more difficult to find the facts on people who have gone missing in the last who knows how many years since Keyes traveled often. It's a shame that he got to choose his own fate where his victims did not and their family's will not get the closure they need.
Sawyer Skiba's comment, October 5, 2013 1:11 AM
When I read this, it seemed like he could have just been saying all of this to bring attention to himself and make himself famous. As everyone else said, it is weird that he had such a variation in his methods and he provided little information. So my thoughts are that once you know your going down, why not go big and get famous. Every one knows who Jeffery Dommer is.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Restorative Justice League of Le Grand High School jumps in to save the day

The Restorative Justice League of Le Grand High School jumps in to save the day | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A teen starts a fistfight with a fellow student. Another brings alcohol to school. Another urinates on a fellow student’s locker, and a fight ensues. Three years ago at Le Grand High School, in Le ...
more...
Joshua Livingston's comment, October 1, 2013 1:21 AM
I really like this article. You read a lot talking about how restorative justice gets better results than traditional means, but you rarely read anything that shows how much people can gain from it. It talks about the changes that are being made and how it helps people.
Sawyer Skiba's comment, October 5, 2013 1:02 AM
I also really enjoyed this. It shows how changing the way people are punished, changing the way a community (school) acts, and the people around can help people out. The principal particularly, he is taking the time to make changes and show the students that he does care. This is making an affect in the students lives. By changing how students are punished, he is helping not label them as the bad kids, which can play a huge role in their future behavior.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Sentencing Law and Policy: Ohio DP Task Force recommends excluding those with "serious mental illness" from capital punishment

Sentencing Law and Policy: Ohio DP Task Force recommends excluding those with "serious mental illness" from capital punishment | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
more...
Joshua Livingston's comment, October 1, 2013 1:26 AM
I don’t agree with the idea of excluding people with mental illnesses. I do understand that there are people out there will real mental problems, but so what does that make the person any less responsible for their actions, besides with the way science is diagnosing people everyone has something wrong with them nowadays severe or otherwise.
Wyndam Childress's comment, October 1, 2013 2:43 PM
I do agree that "mental illness" is becoming over diagnosed. People who commit serious crimes due to their mental illness can take an insanity plea if their issue is legitimately what caused them to commit the crime.
I feel like excluding people with "serious mental illness" from capital punishment would only encourage people to hide behind their disabilities. Just because someone is handicapped, doesn't mean that they aren't capable of committing crime. I recently read about a guy who couldn't get out of bed due to a skin condition, yet with the help of his mother, he tortured his daughter to death over time.
Granted he was physically handicapped,but the same thing could have just as easily happened with someone who was mentally handicapped.
Kristie Major's comment, October 3, 2013 10:06 PM
People consider in these cases that people with mental illness can be excluded from punishment because they are not in control of their actions sometimes. They may not be aware of their actions. I think that not everyone with mental illnesses are not in control of or aware of what they do. The effects of their illness should be taken into account when it comes to punishment. It is possible that people can hide behind their illness but it is something that we should still take into consideration.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A Bold Plan to Aid Sex-Trafficking Victims

A Bold Plan to Aid Sex-Trafficking Victims | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An important initiative in New York aims to treat those charged with prostitution as abused victims, rather than criminals.
more...
BridgetM's comment, October 2, 2013 9:06 PM
This is a step in the right direction. Many of those arrested for prostitution have been victimized for years and do not have any means of getting of the streets. Shelters and half-way houses are overcrowded and can be expensive. I have heard recently that the HIV infection rates in Alaska have started to rise again due to the amount of casual sexual encounters on the internet. With prostitution and with many other crimes, it would be more beneficial for all parties involved to focus more on rehabilitation, rather than deterrence.
Carlie Bailey's comment, October 3, 2013 8:48 PM
"a consensus has emerged among criminal justice professionals that it makes more sense to treat people charged with prostitution as the exploited and abused victims a vast majority are, rather than as criminals." This is exactly what this country needs. We need to treat people like prostitutes, drugs users and so on as victims instead of criminals. The Life Course Theory explains how people become criminals through social interactions and the environments they are placed in. We need to be more sympathetic to an offenders past and help them start a new future.
Rob Duke's comment, October 3, 2013 10:18 PM
I had a worked a little vice in my assignment to a Multiple Enforcement Team (Problem Oriented Policing) in the Eastern Los Angeles Valley, but my eyes were opened during my time policing in California's Central Valley. There I was introduced to about 30 victims of human trafficking and heard their stories. Each had answered an ad to work in a restaurant north of the border, but upon arrival in the U.S., the restaurant turned out to be a bar and the duties were decidedly different than those advertised. In addition, the room and board costs were so high compared with wages that these victims were slaves in all but name. While some were not forced into prostitution, the circumstances were such that they had very little choice if they wanted to survive in a hostile land where they were immigrant members of a powerless group...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Deacon Accused of Shooting Pastor During Service

Deacon Accused of Shooting Pastor During Service | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Woodrow Karey is accused of shooting and killing Pastor Ronald J. Harris, Sr.
more...
Mark Tuttle's comment, October 3, 2013 7:31 PM
This is depressing I read in another article that the shooter thought the pastor was having sex with his wife (http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/01/us/louisiana-pastor-killed/index.html). Very sad story and hopefully the family and those that witnessed it will be able to recover.
John Philip Tilden's comment, October 3, 2013 10:19 PM
I am very curious as well about the motive here, especially since he has no priors. There has got to be more to this story than what is stated.
Sawyer Skiba's comment, October 5, 2013 1:07 AM
I too read that the deacon believed the pastor was having sexual relations with his wife. I find it interesting how people of faith can do stuff like this. They give other Christians a bad name. Its sort of like how some Catholic priests have given many others the child molester title. I do find it interesting that he called the police on himself.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Bystander shot after collision in Mountain View; 2 arrested | Anchorage | ADN.com

Bystander shot after collision in Mountain View; 2 arrested | Anchorage | ADN.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A car crash in Mountain View on Sunday started a chain of events that put a 51-year-old bystander in the hospital with gunshot wounds and two young men under arrest for shooting him as they fled the scene.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

New York to effectively ban McDonald's

New York to effectively ban McDonald's | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
If you're looking to score a Big Mac in New York, you might be out of luck. New regulations proposed in New York would effectively ban McDonald's from the city. You may remember not long ago there ...
Rob Duke's insight:

i guess they've never read "On Liberty".

more...
Kelly Logue's comment, October 3, 2013 11:59 PM
I feel like this is absolutely fantastic and that other states should be following New York's lead on this. They were absolutely right to say that McDonalds food was equal to or worse than the prohibited drugs in NYC. Thus making it obvious that this type of food should not be welcome there. Not only will this plan to remove McDonalds from NYC be beneficial to the people, but I hope that it will teach a lesson to everyone else in the country and they will become knowledgable about the fact that McDonalds isn't good food to eat.
Christie Hampton's comment, October 6, 2013 10:22 PM
"The freedom of people to be healthy trumps your right to sell a product." This statement is utterly insane. The next thing will be the banning of taxis because people should be walking more and riding in a taxi just makes people lazy. I am totally astounded by this violation of free enterprise. This is just one more nail in the coffin of personal responsibility. The biggest problem with the city's statement is that it is too ambiguous. Who's decision is it now of what is healthy or not? Televisions are unhealthy. White collar high stress jobs are unhealthy. Wlaking through the park could be unhealthy if one gets mugged. There's a whole list of unhealthy activities. I don't see how this regulation could be upheld if challenged.
Kelsey Scott's comment, October 7, 2013 11:26 PM
This nonsense makes me so angry. I'm so tired of the people in power thinking that they know what is best for us and with so many people in this country letting them tell them what to do. Why do people still live in NY, CA, IL, or DC? Good gracious.