Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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Psychosis rarely linked to violent crime, study says

Psychosis rarely linked to violent crime, study says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
(HealthDay)—It's rare that people with mental illness have hallucinations and delusions before they commit violent crimes, researchers say.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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....but when it is...look out....

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The Abortion Rate Is Falling Because Fewer Women Are Getting Pregnant

The Abortion Rate Is Falling Because Fewer Women Are Getting Pregnant | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
You might not know it from the political debate, but abortion is becoming increasingly rare in the United States -- and activists on both sides are rushing to take credit. A survey released earlier...
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Marei Benton's comment, June 17, 2015 9:56 PM
I think that these sort of articles are very interesting... Firstly, there are officially more single/unmarried people in the United States than there are married. And according to this, the US's pregnancy rate is declining too... I follow these stats closely because I am one of these people (single, unmarried, childless) and I like to read about why "we" are the way we are... I feel like America is definitely changing in some way about all of this, but I'm not sure that I have words to describe it... Regardless, social security is totally screwed however which way you look at it.
Bethany McNutt's comment, June 23, 2015 1:17 PM
I picked this article because I know that many people are in favor of abortion being illegal. The problem with this is that even if abortions are illegal, people will still find a way to get one if that’s what they really want. Similar to how making drugs illegal doesn’t stop people from doing drugs. I personally believe that abortion should be legal and available to everyone, because it is a woman’s right and should always be considered a woman’s right (it is her body, after all.) If abortion were to become illegal, women would still find a way to get one and doctors who don’t agree with abortion would still perform them. The problem with this is that it would be considered a crime, and it could contribute to crime rates going up. I will never understand how a person could infringe this right and take away this kind of choice from a woman. I’m a woman, and I could never get an abortion, but I full heartedly believe that women should always have that right and they should decide for themselves. If you don’t want an abortion, don’t get one! Simple as that.
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How Some Criminals Evade the Cops for Decades | VICE | United States

How Some Criminals Evade the Cops for Decades | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
VICE: Are Italian mafias better than other criminal groups at spiriting people underground or out of the country for prolonged periods of time?
Richard Lehr: They certainly have an organization that a lot of criminals don't have. A lot of street-level criminals who go on the run, they're basically on their own, which is the case of Whitey Bulger as well. But the mafia certainly has the kind of international organization where, if someone has to go on the run, he can resurface in some foreign village or someplace and live a different life.
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Source: N.Y. prison escapees' getaway driver backed out

Source: N.Y. prison escapees' getaway driver backed out | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Female prison worker who was allegedly supposed to pick up escaped inmates didn't show up, law enforcement source tells CBS News
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Cleveland Police Chief: Officers should see themselves as 'guardians,' not 'warriors'

Cleveland Police Chief: Officers should see themselves as 'guardians,' not 'warriors' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Cleveland Police Chief Calvin Williams said during a news conference Wednesday that he will make it his mission to change the philosophy of policing in Cleveland.
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This is a great idea....

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, June 18, 2015 6:45 AM

GREAT STEP FORWARD!  HE DID NOT DENY ITEXISTED BUT STATE HE WILL BE ADDRESSING THE ISSUE USING TERMS THAT LET US KNOW HE KNOWS WHAT THE TRUE PROBLEM IS!!FROM WARRIORS TO GUARDIANS!! NOW THATS REAL TALK AND WE ASK GOD TO HELP HIM DO AS STATED FOR THE GOOD OF ALL! WITH THE POLICE AND PEOPLE FALLING IN LINE IN UNDERSTANDING WITH ACTIONS TO GET THE JOB DONE !

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Childhood Trauma Leads to Brains Wired for Fear

Childhood Trauma Leads to Brains Wired for Fear | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Last week, a report by the University of San Diego School of Law found that about 686,000 children were victims of abuse and neglect in 2013. T

 

raumatic childhood events can lead to mental health and behavioral problems later in life, explains psychiatrist and traumatic stress expert Bessel van der Kolk, author of the recently published book, The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma.

 

Children’s brains are literally shaped by traumatic experiences, which can lead to problems with anger, addiction, and even criminal activity in adulthood, says van der Kolk. Sound Medicine’s Barbara Lewis spoke with him about his book. 

 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Dorothy Retha Cook's comment, July 30, 2015 11:45 AM
Just one question and I am not coming from the race view but from the children view. The children of slaves were terrorized and traumatized beyond where I want to go or think they were not their own but property of the Master to do with as He saw fit. Now the Master was Liberalin view just as long as it was for his benefit and the slave children were used to purchase property/land and homes and much more for their masters gain not their own. The culture they had was endoctrinated by sheer abuse and brute force but not one of them ever was given a choice. The culture was done as the master say's or get beatin like a dog to the blood runs from their bodies and even for more punishment they were made to watch their parents and other slave members be hang by a neuce by the master with a word of if you ever think of doing thus and so you will surely be next. For some reason the government has not changed much and neither have the abuse of the children and a great deal of it is not in the home or culture environment and some children by law have to return back to the abusive environment and be abused or they or their parent go to jail by law. therefore my question is liberal parenting or not in the 21st century
Dorothy Retha Cook's comment, July 30, 2015 11:48 AM
Who has the true authority over your child(ren) you or the GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS Liberal or not? sorry did not get question in in previous post. WHO HAS THE FINAL SAY and what say do you have if your child(ren) are traumatized by the GOVERNMENT?
Ngozi Angeline Godwell's comment, August 14, 2015 9:17 AM
I quote:"In essence the kids live in a war zone and they get "bombed" and "shelled" and hurt and if they complain there will be more of the same. And on top of that you have "traps" that look innocent but are "gotchas" ! So - from the perspective of an abused kid - nothing, absolutely nothing can be trusted! A little story. A childless couple adopts a foster kid as they can't seem to have kids on their own. They encourage being called mom and dad! She now gets pregnant. The couple fears for their newborn and promptly send the kid back to foster hell! I ask: "You are surprised that they don't trust?". Dolphins are intelligent! We train them. Every human being is trained to live in their cultural matrix! And for abused kids it is enforced with inhuman punishment - not treats. You get what you put in! You put in hate and force and terror - you can't expect love! The kids see aggression and hate and force and brutality and that is their life experience? And if they saw "love" there was probably a trick to really set them up for failure. Gregory Bateson's book "Steps to an Ecology of Mind" touches on these issues.
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The obscure legal system that lets corporations sue countries | Claire Provost and Matt Kennard

The obscure legal system that lets corporations sue countries | Claire Provost and Matt Kennard | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The number of suits filed against countries at the ICSID is now around 500 – and that figure is growing at an average rate of one case a week. The sums awarded in damages are so vast that investment funds have taken notice: corporations’ claims against states are now seen as assets that can be invested in or used as leverage to secure multimillion-dollar loans. Increasingly, companies are using the threat of a lawsuit at the ICSID to exert pressure on governments not to challenge investors’ actions.

“I had absolutely no idea this was coming,” Parada said. Sitting in a glass-walled meeting room in his offices, at the law firm Foley Hoag, he paused, searching for the right word to describe what has happened in his field. “Rogue,” he decided, finally. “I think the investor-state arbitration system was created with good intentions, but in practice it has gone completely rogue.”

Via Svend Aage Christensen
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Five 13-Year-Old Boys Are Asked Why 1 Kid Is Being Bullied…Watch What The Boy On The End Reveals.

Five 13-Year-Old Boys Are Asked Why 1 Kid Is Being Bullied…Watch What The Boy On The End Reveals. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nowadays when we read headlines, it’s difficult not to stumble across some heartbreaking news about a child or children being bullied.
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It's amazing how often people go against their own best interests to help someone else.

Hirschi argues that the interesting question isn't why people commit crimes, but why the REST of us don't.

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Karl Marx and Marxism

via YouTube Capture. Moral Foundations of Politics (PLSC 118) Today, Professor Shapiro continues his discussion of Enlightenment theory of Karl Marx, ...

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EU Crime Alert : Europol on Twitter

EU Crime Alert :   Europol on Twitter | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
#FutureCrime - Key #trends for the future of Serious & Organised #Crime https://www.europol.europa.eu/sites/default/files/Europol_OrgCrimeReport_web-final.pdf … pic.twitter.com/XaNAKF8CNg

Via Marc Van den Broeck
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UCD CCI's curator insight, June 12, 2015 5:09 AM

It's not all about technology

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SEC.gov | SEC Charges CSC and Former Executives With Accounting Fraud

SEC.gov | SEC Charges CSC and Former Executives With Accounting Fraud | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Washington D.C., June 5, 2015 — The Securities and Exchange Commission today charged Computer Sciences Corporation and former executives with manipulating financial results and concealing significant problems about the company’s largest and most high-profile contract.  The SEC additionally charged former finance executives involved with CSC’s international businesses for ignoring basic accounting standards to increase reported profits.
CSC agreed to pay a $190 million penalty to settle the charges, and five of the eight charged executives agreed to settlements.  Former CEO Michael Laphen agreed to return to CSC more than $3.7 million in compensation under the clawback provision of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and pay a $750,000 penalty.  Former CFO Michael Mancuso agreed to return $369,100 in compensation and pay a $175,000 penalty.

Via Svend Aage Christensen
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Healthcare organizations face unique security challenges

Healthcare organizations face unique security challenges | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Healthcare organizations today are facing a new and unique set of challenges. Their recently-digitized healthcare records have turned out to be extremely valuable to criminals, while hospitals, clinics, and other organizations are still learning how to protect them.
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Charles Manson gets parole denied - YouTube

but it's cool
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William Estrin's comment, June 10, 2015 3:27 PM
I am glad that Manson got denied parole. There are some people that should never see the light of day again. This is where my girlfriend and I disagree. It is my personal philosophy that there are just some people that are inherently dangerous and evil, that nothing can ever be done to rehabilitate them, and that the only thing we can do with them is incarcerate them for the rest of their lives in order to protect society from them. But my girlfriend believes that everyone, despite their circumstances, is capable of healing. And I disagree with that. I think that some people are untreatable and will commit crimes no matter what and the only thing to do with them is lock them up for their entire lives. I believe that Manson is one of those people. Not just because of the high media attention he’s gotten and the monster that they’ve painted him as, but from the actual research I’ve done on him myself. Even though he’s been in prison since about 1971, I believe that he’s just as dangerous today as he was back that.
Rob Duke's comment, June 10, 2015 3:40 PM
Yeah, I was going to say that he's still got the gift of taking control of people because he was marrying a 27 year old earlier this year, but the latest is that she was just marrying him so she could put his corpse on display and charge admission. LOL. Couldn't happen to a nicer guy....
Marei Benton's comment, June 12, 2015 2:18 AM
My god, he sounds just as insane now as he did in an interview with him from the 1980s (I think?) that I once watched... Ha, ha, I had wondered about that wedding and if it had ever occurred or not. Last I saw of it on the news, it hadn't happened yet and their period of eligibility had elapsed... So happy that the girl came to her senses (or something)...
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Bail Is a Fundamentally Unfair Way to Coerce Guilty Pleas From Poor People. Here’s a Fix.

Bail Is a Fundamentally Unfair Way to Coerce Guilty Pleas From Poor People. Here’s a Fix. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
On Sunday, John Oliver devoted the majority of his HBO show to America’s broken bail system. “Bail” is the cash or property equivalent demanded of arrestees as surety—an assurance that they will return to court to face trial on the charges they have been accused of. The theory goes like...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Eric Lee's comment, June 14, 2015 11:35 PM
In many cases, the ability or the inability to post bail is probably where there is the most amount of difference between the poor and the rich. If you are unable to post bail for the amount of money that is asked by the courts, you are more of less being imprisoned without due process. Bails ought to be proportionate to the amount of money a person has, rather than match the seriousness of the charges. The idea of bail is to ensure that the defendant will comeback to court, but that doesn't ridiculous amount of money. It should just require the amount of money that is worth a lot to YOU personally. Some people stay in jail for even years before their case is tried, this is also because of their inability to pay a private attorney that will take care of their legal issues quickly.
Bethany McNutt's comment, June 17, 2015 3:36 PM
http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/jurisprudence/2015/06/bail_is_unfair_here_s_a_simple_way_to_fix_it.html
“The problem with bail”
I’m not sure if I agree with this article in the slightest. Bail was created to keep non-violent offenders out of prison while awaiting trial. Even WITH bail being available to non-violent offenders and those who aren’t a risk of fleeing, only 38% of inmates are convicted. Meaning, more than half of the inmates in prison are awaiting trial. I don’t understand how bail can help coerce a guilty plea from poor people. I’d like to think that the court system is here to serve the people (even though I don’t agree with some of it.) I believe that if a person ISN’T guilty, there has got to be a good amount of reasonable doubt. If you aren’t guilty, there is reasonable doubt to be speculated, don’t have a violent history, and aren’t at risk of fleeing, then there is no reason a judge shouldn’t let you out on ROR. I’m sure there are circumstances where an individual may have an arrest record or previous convictions, and a DA might be able to demonstrate how they might flee because they have no ties to the community, but I think those circumstances and chances are pretty low!
William Estrin's comment, June 20, 2015 2:25 PM
This does not surprise me. We live in a society where the poor are at a marked disadvantage over the rest of society. I believe in the saying that “The rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer.” It does not necessarily pertain just to money because I believe the system in our country is designed against the poor people. And that does not reflect the vision our founding fathers had in mind of our land of the free and land of opportunity. I believe that a bail amount should be directly proportionate to that person’s income and assets. For example, let’s say two people commit the exact same crime. Person A has a net worth of approximately $10,000 and person B has a net worth of approximately $100,000. Person B’s bail amount should be set approximately 10 times higher than person’s A bail amount. That way the system remains fair and does not give one class of people any advantage over another class. Assessment of bail should be based on the seriousness of the offense and the likelihood of the offender to return for their court date. It should not be based on a person’s race or be target against the poor.
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Heaven knows we’re miserable now: Reports reveal just how unhappy Americans are — and for good reasons

Heaven knows we’re miserable now: Reports reveal just how unhappy Americans are — and for good reasons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The U.S. is good at a lot of things. But when it comes to happiness and family policy, we're strictly bush leagues

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Marei Benton's comment, June 17, 2015 10:05 PM
God, this is depressing. Out of 179 countries polled, only two - the US and Papua New Guinea - don't have paid maternity leave (or a version thereof)... I mean, seriously, even IRAN has maternity leave. Iran, Iran, like the country where women where the hijab and basically cannot compete in the Olympics.
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 2015 4:19 AM
I think this article puts a lot of things into perspective. There has been a lot of discussion about feminism and feminists. How women aren't treated the same as men and how they should be guaranteed the same as men. The truth is men are not equal to women in other aspects, such as maternity leave like this article points out how men aren't given paternity leave because it is not a mandated federal law. People would probably argue that they don't carry the baby for 9 months and a woman needs to be with the baby, but why shouldn't the father be given time off. This article is proof that in different ways men and women are not equal.
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Do the Poor Make More Rational Financial Decisions Than the Wealthy?

Do the Poor Make More Rational Financial Decisions Than the Wealthy? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
But the poor see the discount through a different lens. They compare the $50 to what it can buy—perhaps a tank of gas or a week’s groceries. Those expenses are a more stable clue to the discount’s value because those tradeoffs do not change based on the tablet’s price. This is a profoundly different approach to making the decision.
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Marei Benton's comment, June 17, 2015 10:15 PM
I was poor by choice for a very long time... ("By choice" means that I couldn't find a profession, or even job, that I loved for almost all of my 20s. I therefore bounced around from bad job to bad job for almost a decade, waiting to find something that really sparked my interest)... I finally found a calling and am now quite upper middle class by the numbers... I am SO grateful to my years of being poor, however, as that time period really taught me about discounts, coupon-ing, and the worth of a dollar in general... Am I now brilliant financially? Of course not. But very little in my house goes to waste from electricity to food.
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 30, 2015 4:29 AM
Before this year I spent money on whatever I wanted, regardless if I needed it or how much money I had. Today I work two jobs and have little time to do the things I normally do. In some ways this is a blessing because I'm not wasting my money going out with friends or spending it on pointless things because I barely have time to think about it. On the other hand, my friends have had the chance this summer to do a lot of fun activities and I had to miss out because I don't have any days off. I've sacrificed my summer and social life to make a lot of money because I set a goal before the school year ended last may, and that was to travel this winter. Setting this goal has really helped me and has made me more conscious of how to manage my money and budget.
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Art of the Hustle: How Do Inmates Con Prison Workers?

Art of the Hustle: How Do Inmates Con Prison Workers? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A prison worker may have been "charmed" into helping a pair of convicted killers escape a maximum security lockup. How does that happen?
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Rob Duke's comment, June 12, 2015 5:22 AM
Yes, and there've been plenty of cases where men have been duped as well....
Brittney Menzel's comment, June 15, 2015 2:53 PM
I'm sure inmates are able to con civilian workers into many things over the course of time. This is a 'bigger deal' because to convicted killers got free, but I'm sure people who work in prisons are daily put up to many things they are not supposed to do. They probably bring contraband in often for certain people. It reminds me of Orange is the New Black and The Following.
Angela Perry's comment, June 16, 2015 5:31 PM
Well to me this is no surprise and the only reason it is getting coverage is because the inmates escaped. Had they not escaped there would be no coverage of this woman committing favorable acts for these inmates. I am sure there is always some kind of illegal acts going on in prisons. If not there would be no outside contraband inside of them. The drug paraphernalia would be non existent in prisons. However, drugs are very prominent in the prison systems. I am sure Ms Mitchell is not the only female that has been "downing the duck" she just didn't get away with it. I would like to know why do the civilian works get less training than the correctional officers get in protecting themselves against these kinds of instances? I feel that everyone working inside of these prison walls should receive the same kind of training so that they can protect themselves when correctional officers can not be with the inmates at all times.
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A plea of insanity: mental illness and the criminal justice system

A plea of insanity: mental illness and the criminal justice system | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Although the courts can exonerate people suffering from mental illness, they cannot always decipher the extent, the effects or even the validity of the defence. Are we excusing people too freely from criminal responsibility, or is the legal system failing those who need it most? Lynne Malcolm and Olivia Willis report.
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Brittney Menzel's comment, June 15, 2015 3:00 PM
Ummm... Well, I have mixed feeling on this subject matter. I do think that mental illness can be a very real demon that some must battle with. However, no matter how severe the illness, I do not think it excuses any type of criminal behavior. Mentally insane or not, each person should be accountable for their actions. An eye for an eye...
Bethany McNutt's comment, June 23, 2015 1:24 PM
I think this is sort of a controversial subject. A lot of people believe that the insanity defense is a bunch of bologna, and that if you commit a crime you should do the prison time. However, it’s important to remember that the sole purpose of our justice system is to rehabilitate these criminals (whether we actually do, is a whole other topic.) If you put a mentally ill person in prison who cannot receive proper care for their mental disorders, they do their time and are eventually let out, did we really rehabilitate them? No. Some people truly belong in a mental institution rather than prison. Some people are not capable of understanding right from wrong, etc. If all mentally ill patients are sent to prison and are eventually let back out without proper mental treatment, they could commit the same crime and end up back in prison again. This is important to remember because it would just increase the crime rates. However, if we were to actually TREAT mentally ill people, send them somewhere where they can actually be treated for their illness, I believe they will be less likely to reoffend. Thus, eventually bringing down crime rates.

With that being said, I do believe that that insanity defense is more than likely abused and that people who are not actually ill still use it. It’s also incredibly difficult to try and decipher from someone who is mentally ill and completely sane.
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The New Nationwide Crime Wave

The New Nationwide Crime Wave | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Writing in The Wall Street Journal about the new nationwide crime wave, Heather Mac Donald says that the consequences of the ‘Ferguson effect’ are already appearing. The main victims of growing violence will be the inner-city poor.
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Heather MacDonald has made a controversial assertion that crime is up due to a Ferguson Effect.

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Brittney Menzel's comment, June 15, 2015 3:02 PM
I guess it's a good thing I don't live in an inner-city... But on a serious note, crime rates are rising and there has been so much controversy over guns and police and other serious matters. It would seem that the higher powers (political) need to get their heads out of their asses and come up with some reasonable solutions.
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Why are The Economist’s writers anonymous?

Why are The Economist’s writers anonymous? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
But having started off as a way for one person to give the impression of being many, anonymity has since come to serve the opposite function at The Economist: it allows many writers to speak with a collective voice. Leaders are discussed and debated each week in meetings that are open to all members of the editorial staff. Journalists often co-operate on articles. And some articles are heavily edited. Accordingly, articles are often the work of The Economist's hive mind, rather than of a single author. The main reason for anonymity, however, is a belief that what is written is more important than who writes it.
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This YouTube Prank Video Is So Appalling It Makes Me Doubt the Point of Existence | VICE | United States

This YouTube Prank Video Is So Appalling It Makes Me Doubt the Point of Existence | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What is this inexplicable human urge to prank? Is this what separates us from the animals: Unlike chimps and unlike dolphins, unlike birds and unlike bees, we think it's funny to run a hair trimmer over someone's head and then pretend we took all their hair off, or walk around LA throwing a lasso over girls before getting legitimately beaten up? Is this the peak of our existence, making our friends believe they've killed someone while racking up the viral hits?
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Managing Collateral Consequences in the Sentencing Process: The Revised Sentencing Articles of the Model Penal Code by Margaret Colgate Love :: SSRN

Managing Collateral Consequences in the Sentencing Process: The Revised Sentencing Articles of the Model Penal Code by Margaret Colgate Love :: SSRN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The debased legal status that results from a criminal conviction makes possible a regime of restrictions and exclusions that feels like punishment to those who
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Pregnant 10-Year-Old Rape Victim May Not Be Allowed An Abortion

Pregnant 10-Year-Old Rape Victim May Not Be Allowed An Abortion | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A prominent human rights organization demanded the Paraguayan government, which currently limits abortions to women whose lives would be in danger if they gave birth, to allow the young girl to rec...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Rob Duke's comment, June 15, 2015 4:44 PM
When does life begin? Did life exist in the clay or the rib before God breathed life into the forms? Is life in the egg or the sperm or both? Is life only present once the two cells combine? I'm not throwing stones, but just exploring the boundaries of this train of thought.....
Angela Perry's comment, June 16, 2015 4:15 PM
I can't believe what i read in this article. Who are they really helping by not allowing her to have an abortion. This little girl is 10 years old for crying outloud.I am sure by no means did she make the decision to lay there and let this happen to her. So why is the decision taken away from her to not have an abortion. This is a life altering event that she will have to deal with forever if she makes it out after giving birth. I do not agree with this by no means at all. This little girl should be allowed to have an abortion and live her life as a child like other children her age.
Bethany McNutt's comment, June 17, 2015 3:44 PM
Abortion is obviously a controversial subject. Even if I would personally never get one because of the horrible effects it has on your body, I whole heartedly believe that it’s a woman’s right to have that choice. The fact that in some places around the world that it’s the lawmaker’s choice, and not the woman’s, is truly sickening to me. I’m not sure if this is true or not, but when abortion first became legal I heard that 20 years later (when people are in the prime of their “crime” committing years), the crime rate actually went down because the people who would have committed the crime due to where they came from (neighborhoods they grew up in and families they would have been born into) were aborted. That’s just an aspect to keep in mind when viewing abortion. There is a criminology aspect and viewpoint to it all.
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A 74-year-old woman is standing trial for allegedly orchestrating a $15 million 'magic cheese' scam

A 74-year-old woman is standing trial for allegedly orchestrating a $15 million 'magic cheese' scam | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A 74-year-old woman is being tried in France for allegedly selling thousands of Chileans a kit that would let them produce "magic cheese" for the cosmetics industry, the BBC reported.
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This is America’s worst college: Screwed-over Corinthian College students get screwed again by so-called debt relief

This is America’s worst college: Screwed-over Corinthian College students get screwed again by so-called debt relief | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
For the past several months, I’ve been writing about the “debt strikers” who attended for-profit colleges in the Corinthian network, which included Heald, Everest and Wyotech campuses. These students have refused to pay back their loans, because they allege Corinthian scammed them, recruiting them into high-cost career training programs with promises of well-paid employment, and instead giving them substandard educations and a worthless degree that’s useless in the job market. Corinthian closed its campuses and announced bankruptcy in early May.
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One side of this coin is that these folks scammed some students, but on the other hand, many of these students needed the junior college opportunity in systems that had too little capacity to serve them....

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