Criminology and Economic Theory
20.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Egypt: Officials admit mistake over toddler sentence

Egypt: Officials admit mistake over toddler sentence | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Egyptian toddler's sentence of life in prison was a mistake, officials say, and neither the boy nor his father will be arrested.
Rob Duke's insight:

I'll say...and what a mistake it was...or at least that's a graceful way to back down...

more...
Nichole Bathe's comment, February 24, 2016 3:49 PM
This is crazy! How could you possibly sentence a 16 month old to life in prison? Not only is that unjustifiable in every way but I also feel that it would be impossible to take care of a toddler in prison... This just goes to show just how bad some justice systems are in the world and how corrupt and problematic they may become. Its really hard to tell if they are just trying to cover their tracks with this new story if they actually made a mistake.
Rob Duke's comment, February 25, 2016 2:07 AM
This is the result of trying thousands of people in the same trial with most of them absent....
Allison Sartori's comment, March 1, 2016 10:23 PM
I agree this is crazy, how has this even gone as far as it has. He is obviously not the suspect of these crimes, he probably can’t even read or write yet. I think this shows how ridiculously things can get blown out of proportion when the press gets involved.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Let Congress decide the Apple-FBI case

Let Congress decide the Apple-FBI case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Apple is thus correct when it says that it isn't being ordered to use some existing, proprietary mechanism to open the phone. It's being required to code a new system that could then be used in the future to open other iPhones subject to court order. And there's no reason to think that only American court orders would apply. Every other country where Apple phones are used — which is to say, everywhere on earth — could then require Apple to comply and open phones under its own laws.
more...
Daniel Heselton's comment, February 23, 2016 3:12 PM
The problem that I see with this whole approach is that it is an unsystematic attempt to decode the digital DNA of security in a hackers world. This is like taking a chainsaw to delicate hand carvings and and calling it a gentile design. Mcafee had the right idea and the FBI should listen to the hacker extraordinaire who has run a successful security software firm for years and regularly chomps it up with the NEO's of the digital world. In this instance the FBI has become agent Smith from the Matrix. It is operating out of pure letter and not scope.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The terrifying link between concussions and suicide

The terrifying link between concussions and suicide | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Suicide and brain injury have long been linked by scientists, but just how many people who have had a brain injury end up committing suicide? A new study has a grim answer: It found that the longterm risk of suicide increases three-fold among adults who have had concussions.

That's the conclusion of a team of Canadian researchers who studied a health insurance database of more than 235,000 people. Their work was recently published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Rather than focus on athletes or people who were hospitalized for days or weeks after head injuries, they looked at ordinary people who had concussions but did not sustain severe brain injury. The researchers matched those whose official death certificates listed suicide with their medical history over a 20-year period. They found a suicide rate of 31 deaths per 100,000 patients - three times the population norm. The mean time between a mild concussion and suicide was 5.7 years, and each additional concussion raised suicide risk.
Rob Duke's insight:

Interesting link with what we studied the last unit....

more...
William Estrin's comment, February 24, 2016 9:53 PM
This is indeed interesting, considering what I studied in criminology last semester. These go along with the positivist school of criminology that suggests that biological factors beyond one's control are responsible for crime. I remember reading last semester how concussions are theorized to increased crime and deviant behavior. Interesting seeing what I learned last semester applied in the real world and in real world articles. You are not allowed to commit suicide even if you want to, so is suicide theoretically a crime? Except charging someone with a successful suicide would be impossible since there would be no living defendant. The only thing is if someone assisted in the suicide, that living defendant could be charged with aiding and abetting a suicide.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Apple’s Tim Cook vs. the FBI, round two: “This case is about much more than a single phone”

Apple’s Tim Cook vs. the FBI, round two: “This case is about much more than a single phone” | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a letter to Apple employees, Tim Cook has reiterated the reasons for the company's resistance to requests from US law enforcement to unlock an iPhone belonging to one of the suspects in the recent mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. The FBI has asked Apple to create a new version of the iPhone's operating system, which would allow...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Everything you need to know about that Kesha court case drama

Everything you need to know about that Kesha court case drama | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Watching tearfully from a courtroom audience, pop star Kesha lost a bid on Friday to be freed from her contract with a top record producer she says drugged, sexually abused and psychologically tormented her.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is where a good pre-text phone call early in the investigation would either have cleared the producer or revealed the evidence needed to convict him.  It goes something like this:

"Hi Dr. Luke?  I think I need to go to the clinic.  I'm late and I need to decide what to do."  Right here is where Dr. Luke would reveal everything....

The pre-text phone call is our most valuable tool in these cases.

more...
Daniel Heppeard's comment, February 22, 2016 1:42 AM
I am actually at a loss for who is guilty: Kesha or Dr. Luke? While Kesha provides a good case for herself, her producer proves a valid point as well. However, Kesha has hundreds upon millions of fans who stand behind her. Regardless of Dr. Luke's standpoint, Kesha is most likely to be the winner of this case. Although, I do agree with what you're saying, Rob. A pre-text phone call would have concluded the case.
Amanda Watkins's comment, February 24, 2016 1:43 PM
This is a double edge sword. If you question if Kesha is telling the truth then you're "victim blaming". I find it interesting that no one else has come out with allegations. Dr. Luke has worked with some big names in the industry and other young impressionable women. I also agree that a pre-text phone call would have helped too.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

FBI director on Apple clash: 'Take a deep breath' in debate over privacy and safety

FBI director on Apple clash: 'Take a deep breath' in debate over privacy and safety | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a plainspoken statement, Comey said that the scale of the San Bernardino attacks, which left 14 people dead and 22 people injured warranted the pursuit of all leads, including reviewing Syed Rizwan Farook’s iPhone 5c.

"I hope folks will take a deep breath and stop saying the world is ending, but instead use that breath to talk to each other," Comey said. 

“We simply want the chance, with a search warrant, to try to guess the terrorist's passcode without the phone essentially self-destructing and without it taking a decade to guess correctly.  That's it,” Comey said. “We don't want to break anyone's encryption or set a master key loose on the land.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

It Took 20 Years For The Government To Pay For An Obvious Way To Prevent HIV

It Took 20 Years For The Government To Pay For An Obvious Way To Prevent HIV | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A few days ago, after I heard the news that Congress had lifted a federal ban on funding for needle exchange programs, I called Alisa Solberg. She runs the Poin…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Don't ask Yelp! for help: Silicon Valley Tech Worker Fired After Blogging About Starving While Working at Billion-Dollar Food Delivery Firm

Don't ask Yelp! for help: Silicon Valley Tech Worker Fired After Blogging About Starving While Working at Billion-Dollar Food Delivery Firm | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Her letter is a summary of the economic misery many millennials have found themselves in after leaving college.
Rob Duke's insight:

Bad Yelp!  

more...
Emily Alvey's comment, February 21, 2016 6:46 PM
Oh my goodness this article speaks to me. My husband and I are struggling to make it in Kodiak. We are constantly juggling whether to buy food or to put gas in the car to get to work, as well as which bills to make each month. My husband went to the store and bought Hamburger meat, hamburger buns, a head of lettuce, tomato paste, and sloppy joe seasoning. He bought everything on sale. Checked prices on everything to make sure he was getting the lowest price on each item. The total ended up being $75. We have been selling personal items, working odd jobs, and doing everything we can just keep a roof over our head, in a 500 square foot apartment we pay $1350 a month for. The business owners and landlords here are criminal. There remains a prevalent and unfortunate belief that “if you can’t afford living here, feel free to leave.” Kodiak is facing a major depression, the economy is beginning to tank in a reflection of the depression the lower 48 experienced just years ago. My husband and I are planning our migration to the mainland, and yet we have to be able to save just to get off the island. It is a sad truth we are facing, and it is becoming more and more obvious that we are just a number with a dollar sign to many. The girl in this article decided to speak out against the situation, and Yelp! decided that there are plenty of others struggling that will work without complaint. I fear that these types of issues are only going to get worse.
Meaghan Tucker's comment, February 22, 2016 3:39 AM
It is sad that this is what the world has come to. Instead of working to change things in business they would rather fire someone that is already on the verge of being homeless. He should not have fired her if he could not stand up for what he was doing.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A Harvard psychologist says people judge you based on 2 criteria when they first meet you

A Harvard psychologist says people judge you based on 2 criteria when they first meet you | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Psychologists refer to these dimensions as warmth and competence respectively, and ideally you want to be perceived as having both.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Dementia appears on the decline, preliminary study shows

Dementia appears on the decline, preliminary study shows | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
USC-led analysis of vital statistics and the U.S. Health and Retirement Survey reveals a drop in the dementia rate among men and women 65 and older.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Here Are The 8 Most Dangerous Cities In Southern California

Here Are The 8 Most Dangerous Cities In Southern California | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The crime rate in these Southern California cities are extremley high.  
Rob Duke's insight:

Sounds about right.  San Bernardino never changes....#1 on the list.

more...
Emily Alvey's comment, February 21, 2016 3:47 PM
My grandma lives in the same house that they have lived in since before my dad was born in Lancaster, CA. I know that in the last decade, the town has gone downhill very fast. This is due to many factors, including the area surrounding being built up, making Lancaster the more rundown neighborhood. Because there are nice houses nearby in newer neighboring towns, it has driven property values down and made Lancaster a lower income area. Another factor is that the town once had a high military presence, as it is home of a large Air Force base, however the outlying areas that are newer are being more utilized now. Also, I believe there has been a prison built in the area, so that brings many families of those imprisoned who desire to live closer, as well as the ease of transition post release. Because my grandma has lived there for over 60 years, it has been almost impossible to convince her to move, despite the danger. I experience similar fears with my mom who lives in the area where I grew up, which is becoming more and more dangerous.
Rachel O'Hagin Aleman's comment, February 21, 2016 5:02 PM
This is not my initial post on this article. It is however in response to Wyatt's post. That is awful. I lived I CA my whole entire life until just about a year ago. I lived in a small town known as Salinas CA and it was just as horrible.
Rachel O'Hagin Aleman's comment, February 21, 2016 5:11 PM
From reading this list it seemed to me that quite a few of these cities where located fairly close to the border that divides Mexico ad California. Now I am not saying that, that is a contributing factor as to why crime rates are so high in these areas; however, from the pictures that was posted it did seem that these cities were a bit on the impoverished side. I too would like to see the poverty rates and even unemployment rates of these cities and see if that is a contributing factor as to why there is such a heightened criminal activity in these areas. I grew up in Salinas CA, which too me is a very dangerous city riddled with gang violence and drug crimes. There is in an area that I have dubbed prostitution row, where girls are pimped out and walk the streets. Just the other day I received a message that my fathers truck was broken into, this is the second time in a 2 year span that someone in my family has been a victim of a crime. But since I have grown up in this town I know that unemployment is high and that in some areas gangs predominate.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Pennsylvania to let more ex-offenders expunge criminal records | Reading Eagle - NEWS

Pennsylvania to let more ex-offenders expunge criminal records | Reading Eagle - NEWS | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Gov. Tom Wolf said the bill he signed into law will give low-level offenders
more...
Allison Sartori's comment, February 20, 2016 8:52 PM
I think this could cause problems with people obtaining employment in fields that they shouldn’t due to their criminal activities if their records have been expunged. Also I think this leads to more and more types of charges becoming available in the future. Also this would leave me to question if their records are expunged, then would their records come into play if they reoffend for sentencing. I don't agree with this and feel your record should show your correct record.
Wyatt Duncan's comment, February 21, 2016 1:15 AM
I am all for giving people second chances, everybody screws up... There are many crimes that many people commit while they are young, its only a matter of who gets caught and who doesn't. Their lives shouldn't be completely over because of one screw up.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Video captures key moment in the bizarre Alaska saga of fraud defendant Avery

Video captures key moment in the bizarre Alaska saga of fraud defendant Avery | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A few months before his aviation empire disintegrated, years before he was accused in a $52 million fraud case, Mark Avery had his video camera running as he presented a $2.4 million World War II plane to his right-hand man, Rob Kane.
more...
Linda Darnell's comment, February 18, 2016 3:15 PM
It seems as though Avery shows potential for some kind of possible mental illness. You would think someone who was going to engage in this type of crime, would attempt to cover their expenditures and be a little more smart about hiding the excessive spending, or at least showing a business need for the extravagant purchases. This reminds me of a bipolar friend who started a business then fell into copyright and other legal issues shortly after. This seems to be in line with a manic episode or something similar.
Linda Darnell's comment, February 18, 2016 3:15 PM
It seems as though Avery shows potential for some kind of possible mental illness. You would think someone who was going to engage in this type of crime, would attempt to cover their expenditures and be a little more smart about hiding the excessive spending, or at least showing a business need for the extravagant purchases. This reminds me of a bipolar friend who started a business then fell into copyright and other legal issues shortly after. This seems to be in line with a manic episode or something similar.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Kalamazoo shooting suspect may have switched cars the night of rampage

Kalamazoo shooting suspect may have switched cars the night of rampage | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police in Kalamazoo, Michigan, are looking for a motive. Jason Brian Dalton is charged with murder. Police say he told them he "took people's lives."
more...
William Estrin's comment, February 24, 2016 9:45 PM
I heard about this story. Another sickening mass shooting. However, as a gun loving republican, I truly believe stricter gun control isn't the answer. It's funny how in almost every other crime that occurs, we blame the person and not the mechanism. When someone drives while intoxicated and kills someone we blame the person and not the car. When someone detonates a bomb in a crowded mall, we blame the person and not the bomb. Yet when a mass shooting occurs, we blame the gun and not the person. Just goes to show how the influence of the media and those in power can jade your way of thinking. I have heard different versions of this story now. Interesting how some stories like the Sandy Hook shooting draw massive amounts of conspiracy theories and others are much more widely accepted.
Trevor Norris's comment, February 25, 2016 2:07 AM
William Estrin, you hit it right on the head. I 100% agree with what you've said. A lot of left-winged people and media have started to blame the mechanism rather than the person. I have had a round in the chamber of my pistol sitting on my hip, and it has yet to unholster itself and harm someone. Statistically, cities and states that have stricter gun control laws have often exhibited no to increased effect on crime. If a shooting was to occur, the people that can respond the fastest are the people that are there. In those situations, the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. Criminals are called criminals because they don't follow the law. Good people are usually called "good people" because they follow the law. Posting a sign or writing a law prohibiting or restricting firearms will only effect the people that follow them. Criminals do not follow the law.
Charles Marble's comment, February 26, 2016 8:09 AM
Such a tragedy for the victims and their families as well as the family and friends of the shooter. I don not know why, but there seem to be people who have no mental illness history that just snap and commit some horrible crimes. I do not see stricter gun laws being the answer as those that intend on doing harm will find a way, and black market guns are easily accessible to those with the money to get them. All that more strict gun laws do is make it harder for responsible people to get a gun whether it be for protection or recreation. Basically, if someone wants to get a gun to do harm, with or without more strict gun laws, there will always be the means to obtain them through illegal means. Tightening down on gun control/laws seems to make those of us who are or want to be responsible gun owners more a sitting duck, I feel.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

L.A. County spends more than $233,000 a year to hold each youth in juvenile lockup

L.A. County spends more than $233,000 a year to hold each youth in juvenile lockup | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Los Angeles County's juvenile detention system was designed in an era when youth crime was on the rise.
The number of juvenile arrests has fallen dramatically in recent years. Some say the system has not kept up with this shift, and now it's costing taxpayers money.A county audit found that the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Bill would reduce texting-while-driving penalty

Bill would reduce texting-while-driving penalty | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The bill would reduce the penalty for driving while texting without causing an injury from a misdemeanor to a violation, making it possible for officers to issue citations to distracted drivers. Stiffer penalties would remain in cases involving injury or death.
more...
William Estrin's comment, February 24, 2016 9:57 PM
This bill doesn't make any sense to me. It's been statistically proven over and over again that texting while driving impairs you just as much as driving while intoxicated. So in my mind, they are both just as serious. And I don't think we are going to pass a bill anytime soon that reduces the penalty for driving while intoxicated, so why are we considering passing a bill for reducing the penalty for something that impairs you just as much?
Rob Duke's comment, February 25, 2016 1:40 AM
It seems to me that the big states may have contributed to this problem by banning talking on cel phones while driving. I don't remember texting being a thing before that...and, I think I prefer to have someone talking (hands free) than texting, since that's similar to talking to a passenger or singing along with the radio.
Mary Grubbs's comment, February 26, 2016 4:13 PM
I get really upset when I look over and see someone texting and driving. Studies have shown that it is just as bad as being intoxicated. Maybe instead of handing out tickets, maybe they should have to involuntarily have to attend a screening of what happens to people when they text and drive, maybe seeing horrible images of accidents (covering up faces) that were the direct result of texting may deter a person from doing it themselves ever again.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Alaskans voice concern about comprehensive crime reform bill at hearing

Alaskans voice concern about comprehensive crime reform bill at hearing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Two Anchorage police officers said they had similar concerns. Anchorage Police Department Employees Association, the police union, said in written testimony that it also opposed the omnibus reform bill.

The bill emerged from a set of recommendations issued by the Alaska Criminal Justice Commission in December. The commission said the reforms would reduce the prison population and save $424 million over the next decade.

Those recommendations included re-evaluating pretrial practices, locking up serious and violent offenders, strengthening parole and probation to keep Alaskans from re-offending, and giving crime victims a greater priority in the law.

Sen. John Coghill, R-North Pole and the vice chairman of the commission, placed some of the recommendations in SB 91, which he introduced.

Alaska’s politicians and members of the justice commission have lauded the work done so far, but they acknowledged that changes in the way justice works statewide is a long way off. The commission is continuing its data-driven work, holding weekly meetings in Anchorage.

Winston touched on a number of issues the Office of Victims' Rights uncovered. She said reductions to bail and sentencing laws, practices governing the time served before inmates are eligible for parole and more lenient criminal penalties for certain crimes may prolong victims’ suffering.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Shooter's iCloud Password Reset With FBI Consent

Shooter's iCloud Password Reset With FBI Consent | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The FBI released a statement late Saturday refuting a federal official who had said the agency was unaware the password was reset until after it had occurred on the iCloud account associated to Syed Rizwan Farook's iPhone. The official had said Friday a county information technology employee executed the reset without being asked to do so by federal authorities.

"Since the iPhone 5C was locked when investigators seized it during the lawful search on December 3rd, a logical next step was to obtain access to iCloud backups for the phone in order to obtain evidence related to the investigation in the days following the attack," said the FBI statement.
more...
Trevor Norris's comment, February 22, 2016 3:33 AM
I am hoping that the information they gather from this iPhone will help prevent or even solve crimes in the future. It's sad that this stuff has come to American soil, but hopefully any information gathered can save some lives of the American people.
Daniel Heselton's comment, February 23, 2016 3:03 PM
I would hope that they are able to get information that will allow them to understand the people they are dealing with a little better. As far as crime prevention and or solving is concerned; I think that the reality is you can only do so much to "prevent" extremism in a pluralistic and politically correct society such as ours. Not only that but our common law system is akin to a "hitchhikers guide to the galaxy" type reaction to this type of stuff because of things such as privacy, due process, etc.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Utah man dies in police custody after being jailed for $2,400 unpaid medical bill

Utah man dies in police custody after being jailed for $2,400 unpaid medical bill | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“We go to great lengths to never arrest anybody on these warrants,” Elder County Chief Deputy Sheriff Dale Ward told the Ogden Standard-Examiner. “The reason we do that is we don’t want to run a debtors’ prison. There is no reason for someone to be rotting in jail on a bad debt.”

“How can you get blood out of a turnip?” Josh Daniels of the Utah-based Libertas Institute said. “The thing about going to jail, your time does not pay your debt… A person should be obliged to pay, but putting him in jail doesn’t solve the problem.”

Iverson’s death brings more questions about the modern-day debtors’ prisons, what Utah is calling “justice courts.” According to he Standard-Examiner, in the last three years, 13 people have been arrested and jailed for debts similar to Iverson’s, many from government agencies.

Last fall, John Oliver blew the lid off of the corrupt system of debtors’ prisons which are supposed to be illegal but that isn’t stopping many. The Free Thought Project cites a report from last October by the Sixth Amendment Center, which says that Utah’s “justice courts” exist to monetize misery, rather than to ensure justice or any kind of due process. In Iverson’s case, there was neither.
more...
Meaghan Tucker's comment, February 22, 2016 3:31 AM
They should not have placed him in jail. Placing somebody in jail does not pay their debt or solve the problem of somebody not having a job. They just need to take their tax returns and use that to pay off their debt.
Daniel Heselton's comment, February 23, 2016 3:17 PM
I have an idea! Let us take a debtor and put them in jail which will cost us more money! As if the justice system didn't have enough cost issues already.
Christopher L. Baca's comment, March 4, 2016 9:07 PM
This is a sad issue that is much too common for my tastes. I'm not promoting that we need to increase taxes to help pay for a suitable living for people in prisons, but I feel the issue could have been solved if the prison (as Josh Daniels said) could have done something different as being in jail does not pay your debt.
I feel perhaps an in-prison job could have been a good middle ground for the man to serve some time as a lesson and earn an income to pay back his bill.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

John Rawls

John Rawls | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In “A Theory of Justice”, Mr Rawls attempted to lay out a defendable basis for an equality-minded liberalism. Its pillars were two principles of justice: the inviolability of individual rights and the idea that when justifying social inequality—some degree of which was inevitable in a flourishing and prosperous society—absolute priority should be given to the needs of the worst off. By putting rights back at the centre of the enterprise and by re-invoking the old idea of a notional social contract among putative equals, Mr Rawls did much to free political theory in America and Britain from apparent cul-de-sacs. It also encouraged philosophers to think more practically about moral issues in the public arena.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Kalamazoo killer Jason Dalton was an Uber driver who took passengers for a terrifying ride during spree

Kalamazoo killer Jason Dalton was an Uber driver who took passengers for a terrifying ride during spree | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FOX17 is investigating an online posting that claimed that Dalton had been reported earlier to 911 for driving erratically and scaring customers who escaped from the car when the driver slowed down.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Anchors away

Anchors away | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Last year another anchor, Shigetada Kishii, used his news slot on TBS, a rival channel, to question the legality of bills passed to expand the nation’s military role overseas. The questioning was nothing less than what most constitutional scholars were also doing—and in private senior officials themselves acknowledge the unconstitutionality of the legislation, even as they justify it on the ground that Japan is in a risky neighbourhood and needs better security. But Mr Kishii’s on-air fulminations prompted a group of conservatives to take out newspaper advertisements accusing him of violating broadcasters’ mandated impartiality. TBS now says he will quit. The company denies this has anything to do with the adverts, but few believe that.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Here Are 10 Of The Most Charming Small Towns in Southern California

Here Are 10 Of The Most Charming Small Towns in Southern California | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Small towns are magical places. Check out the list of the best small towns that are begging for a visit.
Rob Duke's insight:

And, equal time for the charming places in So. Cal.

more...
Forrest Smoes's comment, February 22, 2016 4:26 AM
Growing up in a small town I have a heart for the “small town” atmosphere. In the town I grew up in crime rates were extremely low, maybe one or two felonies reported a year so hearing about the town happenings was a big deal. I’d be interested in seeing how the small towns of southern California are influenced, if at all, by the higher crime rate nature of big city crime in the same geographical area, if high income raises more white collar crimes or if nearby cities influence street crimes.
Rob Duke's comment, February 22, 2016 11:56 AM
In my experience, small towns are too small to "mind your own business", therefore the power of social norms is greater. People who drive fast in the city do so because they have anonymity. In a small town your neighbors would shame you for the same behavior. It may be that control of small things also leads to control of larger behavior. I also found that small towns tend to watch their neighbor's property better, thus making them poor choices for the nearby "big city" criminals, though they do sometimes wander in....
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

'Grow up' and stop taking naked photos of yourself, police tell revenge porn inquiry

'Grow up' and stop taking naked photos of yourself, police tell revenge porn inquiry | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Australian federal police assistant commissioner Shane Connelly denies he is victim blaming in saying people should stop taking naked shots of themselves to curb revenge pornography
more...
Trevor Norris's comment, February 22, 2016 2:59 AM
I think this is a good example of the merits of target hardening. Making victims less vulnerable through simple education can prevent crime. Although it does not prevent crime altogether, it ends up being one's choice in the end to do something or not. In this case, I think the commissioner is being very straightforward. I think he is just advising people that there are risks involved with sending nudes to one another.
Krista Scott's comment, February 22, 2016 3:12 AM
I completely agree with this article and the Australian Federal Police Assistant people in our society not just Australians but humans in general need to know that sending out "nudes" over instant messaging and social media direct messages there is always a risk that they are taking. Connelly wasn't victim blaming he was honestly just speaking the truth. Most people lack in education of what could potentially happen to them when they CHOOSE o send sexually explicit photos of themselves out. I think there should be legal penalties for both parties not just the revenge posters. Particularly for the underage minors who send out the pictures punishments for both parties could potentially alleviate the amount of cases of revenge pornography because of the risk of consequences for both sending sexual content and the perp slandering the content all over social media.
Mary Grubbs's comment, February 26, 2016 4:35 PM
I completely understand what they are trying to get across to people. People have to remember that once it goes online it stays online. One should be very careful what they share to others over the Internet. I like that laws are being created and have been created to punish these people that send out these things of people they have a beef with or maybe even be bragging to others. But I also like that hey are saying don't make yourself a victim and know that nothing is ever sacred.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

VIDEO: Homeless Veteran Has An Intense Reaction To Bait Car Experiment

VIDEO: Homeless Veteran Has An Intense Reaction To Bait Car Experiment | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Hammy TV recently did a challenge – test out people’s honesty with a bait prank. He scattered some cash about the seat and dashboard of his car, rolled down the window and left it. First in a well-…
more...
Daniel Heppeard's comment, February 22, 2016 1:27 AM
I remember seeing this video pop up a couple of times on my Facebook wall. It doesn't surprise me one bit to see all of these people steal the money right out of his car. I didn't think people in the wealthy neighborhood would steal the money because they have their own money. I was proven wrong. The ending of the video is quite amazing as well. Rather than taking about $500, the veteran instead places the money in the glove compartment. It makes me want to have faith in humanity and it makes me feel really sad for the veteran. It seemed like he was in a poor state.
Meaghan Tucker's comment, February 22, 2016 3:49 AM
Seeing this video was kind of sad. knowing that there are people everywhere that will take anything that is not their weather someone else had to work hard for it or not. We live in sad world. We should not have to lock up our belongings,but we do have to. At least there are some people still out there that will do the right thing like the veteran did.
Meaghan Tucker's comment, February 22, 2016 3:49 AM
Seeing this video was kind of sad. knowing that there are people everywhere that will take anything that is not their weather someone else had to work hard for it or not. We live in sad world. We should not have to lock up our belongings,but we do have to. At least there are some people still out there that will do the right thing like the veteran did.