Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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Privatization of the Police; Police: banks pay to fight cybercrime

Privatization of the Police; Police: banks pay to fight cybercrime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In response, he is promising that in 2014 the Met plans “a major step change in the way we deal with cyber crime and fraud in London by establishing what will be a world-leading unit to counter them. We plan to dedicate hundreds more officers solely to these types of crime.”

And while the Met going cap in hand to the banks for funding may be a controversial approach - independent cyber security expert Mark Stollery of PA Consulting told SCMagazineUK.com there are precedents.

Stollery said the City of London Police force Insurance Fraud Department (IFED) is funded by Association of British Insurers members, and the Dedicated Cheque and Plastic Crime Unit (DCPCU) – made up of officers from the City of London and Met Police forces – is fully sponsored by the banking industry.

Stollery told SC: “I can see why the banks may be sucking their teeth and saying this is police work - but the fact is the banks are going to be suffering indirectly because they're having to pick up the pieces of their customers who are going to be suffering. However unjustifiably, they will be risking a bit of reputational damage.”

Via Svend Aage Christensen
Rob Duke's insight:

Insurance companies do this also in the form of the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB).

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The Man Who Found the Man Who Broke the Music Business | VICE | United States

In Witt's incredible, possibly canonical How Music Got Free (out now from Viking), the writer traces how the audio compression technology went from almost dying in a format war with the MP2 (a Betamax vs. VHS type of battle) and tracks down the patient zero of music piracy and album leaks: a savvy rough rider named Dell Glover, who worked in a North Carolina CD plant and smuggled out almost every major album released in the aughts under his oversized belt buckle. Without this one tatted-out guy, online piracy would have been impossible, MP3s wouldn't have gained an online user base, and the technology would have likely become just be a blip in media history.
Rob Duke's insight:

I worked in one of the only 24 track analog studios in the LA region in the early 1980's when I was in high school.  I still lament how the music industry has changed from a world where you could buy the vinyl album and then dub your favorite songs onto metallic tape; or even pirate your favorite song from the radio (lower quality) and try to cut the song off just right so you avoided the announcer (yes, a real life announcer).  These guys and gals would actually tell you the name of the artist(s) and sometimes some trivia about the band or the next concert dates in the area.  I still amaze my kids with how many classic rock and country artists I know from just a few bars of their most famous songs.  Yes, and these were all crimes (statute has run for my misdeeds, sorry), not that any of us were aware of this at the time...hell! as far as I know the laws may have come after this period.  We were just high school kids sharing music to play as we cruised up and down PCH trying to impress each other in our hotrods (mine was a '68 Cougar painted candy-apple red).  My recording studio friends and I pirated the heck out of each other's music.  I had a great collection of bootlegged tapes of bands like SuperTramp, Floyd, the Dead, Moody Blues, etc.  The more full the sound, the better to listen on headphones late at night (headphones...not earbuds!)(Listening to Queen News of the World from vinyl on headphones is one of life's great joys...yes, I know that probably sounded like grandma saying: "Lawrence Welk is on, come listen kiddies..." but I don't care, it was that good!).

 

This is another example of institutions and how they change behavior.  Also, the idea that some things may be more common pool resources than we think.  Certainly some bands think that way.  I heard Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers encouraging fans to steal their CD and sneak into the concert; and the Black Keys has given away their first albums.

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Gabriel Flores's curator insight, June 16, 3:44 PM
its crazy to think of the fact that one man  alone started the music industry's "worst crisis. i do believe that now it be almost impossible to pirate anything if that incident didn't happen thanks to technology . than again in the other hand they would of ultimately find another way to pirating its only of finding out how to hack the system.
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This is how much energy it takes to legalize weed

This is how much energy it takes to legalize weed | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Marijuana growers in Denver are draining the city's electricity supplies.
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The shocking truth about today's apocalypse involving Wall Street, China, ISIS, & United Airlines

The shocking truth about today's apocalypse involving Wall Street, China, ISIS, & United Airlines | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"WHAT THE HELL IS GOING ON?"
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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 25, 2015 9:05 PM
Regulating and providing a more secure way to prevent cyber attacks would be instrumentally beneficial to the United States. I'm not sure why matters have not been taken? Do we have to wait for something extreme/bad to happen in order to fix the problem. Matters should be taken to just prevent this from happening.
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King of Kings

King of Kings | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
JUST after Christmas in 1817 Percy Bysshe Shelley, then 25, sat down to write a poem. This was not, of course, unusual. He had spent most of the year doing the same,...
Rob Duke's insight:

This article is a wonderful allegory on White Collar Crime.  "My name is Ozymandias--King of Kings", the name inscribed on a toppled statue in the Egyptian sands.....

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CSI Alaska: Who's burying bear bodies in Midtown Anchorage?

CSI Alaska: Who's burying bear bodies in Midtown Anchorage? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Several months ago,  Margan Grover -- a field anthropologist and research associate at UAA -- asked the Alaska Department of Fish and Game if UAA could acquire several bear carcasses for its forensics class.
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Bringing Broken-Windows Policing to a Crime-Ridden Neighborhood: Wall Street

Bringing Broken-Windows Policing to a Crime-Ridden Neighborhood: Wall Street | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Wall Street was a huge digital neighborhood, almost completely unpatrolled, and steeped in a culture with a diminished sense of fiduciary responsibility to the firm, the customer, or really anyone. It was, in language Giuliani would understand, an environment filled with broken windows, and conducive to abuse.
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The Case for the 32-Hour Workweek

Ryan Carson, the CEO of Treehouse, discusses the benefits of a four-day workweek and why more companies can, and should, do it.
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'Sharing economy' masks cold business interest

'Sharing economy' masks cold business interest | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The EU is currently considering how it should respond to the phenomenon which is often called the "sharing economy".
But there is a danger that lawmakers get caught up in a slick Silicon Valley narrative, which portrays profit-seeking companies as altruistic public services.

Via Svend Aage Christensen
Rob Duke's insight:

Uber is a good example of this....better to have taxi cabs with their imbedded political power?

For my own part, I'll take institutions that bring all activity into the light to invite all competition and in order to better regulate when we find those companies who are not altruistic (or at least act as "bad" citizens).....

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Greece not alone: Several Eurozone countries are still paying back debt from WWI and even 18th century debt!

Incredibly, because the 4% Consuls were used to refinance even older debt, some of the debt being repaid in early 2015 goes as far back as the 18th century. “In 1853, then-chancellor Gladstone consolidated, among other things, the capital stock of the South Sea Company originating in 1711, which had collapsed in the infamous South Sea Bubble financial crisis of 1720,” the UK Treasury said. And Chancellor George Goschen converted bonds first issued in 1752 and subsequently used them to finance the Napoleonic and Crimean Wars, as well as the Slavery Abolition Act of 1835.
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Gruesome weekend leaves Chicago police chief reeling - CNN.com

When a city has seven killings in two days, including the death of a 7-year-old boy, something is systemically wrong.
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Angela Perry's comment, July 6, 2015 8:39 PM
This is a very sad story right here. I do agree with the statement "if Amari's dad was in jail he would still be with us today." Amari's dad had been arrested 45 times is a bit on the ridiculous side if you ask me. What happened to 3 strikes and you are out rule? What makes Amari's dad special that he wasn't put away for a while since his excessive arrest record. I want to believe that our justice systems are there to rehabilitate those that are entering them but this just makes me believe that they are so full there is no one being rehabilitated. I hope too that they find the other gang member that shot and killed Amari is put away for a very long time. Maybe they can make an example out of him so the other gang members can learn a lesson. But I know that is wishful thinking at this point.
Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, July 13, 2015 5:56 PM

So, if 7 killings a day in a city means that something is wrong with the system I also think that it has a lot to do with the community as well.  You cannot blame the system for people murdering other people.  There is a lot of crazy people who are influenced by crazy stuff.  The system cannot stop a repeat offender from offending unless they keep them locked up for a long time.  Inorder for this to happen the offender has to do something drastic enough to get locked up.

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Does too much testosterone make men behave irresponsibly?

Does too much testosterone make men behave irresponsibly? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Research published yesterday by Imperial College London suggests that hormones testosterone and cortisol may be having a negative and potentially dangerous influence on the decision-making processes of City workers.
According to the study, the naturally-occurring steroids have been found to markedly increase the chances of risk-taking and audacious behaviour in men whose responsibilities include commercial and economic transactions.
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Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 2015 7:02 PM
That's quite an interesting topic. I've never thought about traders and financiers having too much testosterone, but I can see it being an issue for some. Being "manly" can get in the way of logical thinking and reasoning at times. Why not on the trading floor?
William Estrin's comment, July 7, 2015 5:34 PM
This article does not surprise me. I have always known that an excess of testosterone has been linked to impulsivity and irrational behavior. Basically, men are by nature more impulsive, irrational, and obviously more crime-prone than women. A low level of testosterone is more ideal in my opinion to, in a sense, keep men from being men. Banking and trading stocks requires a lot of patience over a period of many years, to be done right. Therefore, it does not surprise me that impulsive financial moves, even at the Wall Street level can be attributed to high levels of testosterone. Of course, not a lot of sources are going to be willing to admit that. No one wants to know that the reason they lost all their investments were because the guys on Wall Street had a little much testosterone pumping through their bodies. Like I said, I believe it is important in men with high levels of testosterone to find a way to lower it in order to essentially keep men from being men. I believe it boils down to our biology. Men are wired to hunt and women are wired to nest. Hunting involves a lot more heat of the moment risk taking, while nesting is an art that requires patience. I believe those genes follow us to this day and that’s why a lot more men than women are irrational and impatient. Unlike primitive times, our society requires sophistication and patience and thus men need to tone it down a bit.
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Photos of Kids Playfully Crossing the US-Mexico Border | VICE | United States

Photos of Kids Playfully Crossing the US-Mexico Border | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Recently a storm took out a chain link fence separating the two countries at a park bisecting Tijuana and San Diego, letting people jump back and forth between nations.
Rob Duke's insight:

I interviewed a guy from Nayarit, Mexico who told me that he came to the U.S. for love.  I thought he had followed a girl, but he told me that his brother had been lucky to find his love when they were both children.  From an early age they both pledged their love to each other.  When they were of age, they wed and were living the "good life", but then one day a drug kingpin saw the bride and wanted her for his own.  She was, you see, a rare beauty...the kind that turn out to be princesses in storybooks.  But, alas, this was no fairy-tale: the kingpin had the groom killed and took what he wanted.  On the day of his brother's death, this man told me that he started walking north.  He no longer wished to live where you could die just because you loved.  He knew that if he ever would love in peace it would be here in the U.S.

 

This is why I don't believe we will ever stop the tide of people who wish to be here....you cannot stop love.

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Bethany McNutt's comment, July 6, 2015 1:04 PM
I think we are all really quick to judge illegal and even legal immigrants. We think, “They are going to take our jobs”, “there won’t be enough jobs for Americans”, “they are here illegally, what else will they do that is illegal”, “they are here illegally so they need to commit crime to get by” etc. However, I watched a recent ted talk which was very thought provoking and it opened my eyes immensely. The video essentially revolves around human rights and the idea that we should think to ourselves, “what are they running from”. The fact of the matter is that we should look to see what these people are running from, rather than getting upset for them being here. The numbers of increased dead bodies that they have found just in the last 10 years along the border is absolutely astonishing and really helps paint a picture that these people would risk death than continue living in Mexico. I left the link down below for anyone who is interested in watching it. It gave me a whole new perspective on immigration and the Mexican border.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPlpbFKWc6E
William Estrin's comment, July 7, 2015 5:04 PM
This was a very interesting article to read. I did not realize that on the shores of the beach, there were gaps in the fence that allowed someone to cross the border. I figured that along the entire U.S./Mexican border, from southeast Texas to the West Coast of California, that there was a 20 foot tall fence along every inch of the border and that there were no gaps in any of the wiring. I figured that border patrol security was so tight that any gaps in wiring would be detected and fixed almost immediately. I didn’t realize that in some places the gaps or parts of the fence were corroded or missing. Even though I’m a firm republican and against illegal immigration, I have to say that the story and the pictures were kind of cute. Since it was only kids, it doesn’t really concern me. Kids will be kids and to be honest, if I was a kid in that situation, I’d probably do the same thing! However, while I do believe that kids will be kids, we cannot send the message the border security is a laughing matter. But that article did bring me a chuckle. It’s interesting to note that I recall on an episode of the National Geographic series, Alaska State Troopers, they documented how some people living in villages extremely close to Russia, would cross over the frozen Bering Strait into Russia during the winter. It was mostly kids on snow machines and obviously the Russian authorities were not amused. But people liked doing it just for the thrill of it.
William Estrin's comment, July 7, 2015 5:18 PM
@Bethany McNutt - I understand your human rights concerns and I am also compassionate to those suffering and in pain. However, the United States only has so many resources, jobs, etc. and they have to spread those limited resources among the entire population. And if there are too many people in the population, we will all suffer. Think of what happened the night the Titanic sank and there weren't enough lifeboats for everyone aboard. After the ship sank, there were approximately 700 people safely in lifeboats, while another 1,500 people were left in the freezing cold water to die of hypothermia and drowning. While the people in the lifeboats were surely heartbroken hearing the screams of the other 1,500 people (in some cases their husbands and other family members) who were dying, they didn't go back. As much as they were sympathetic, they realized that if they went back and rescued everybody, they would have all scurried into the lifeboats, the lifeboats would have sank and then everybody would have died. Despite pleas to humanity, they knew they had to leave the others behind in order to save themselves. I think it’s kind of the same concept here. I’m really sorry that life is so poor in your country, but if we let everybody in who’s suffering in another country, we’re all going to flounder. What are your thoughts on this?
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"I’ll be here ‘till I’m ready to leave." • Juvenile in Justice

"I’ll be here ‘till I’m ready to leave." • Juvenile in Justice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’m 17. I been here about six months. I was 12 when I first went to juvie. I’m back for a violation this is my second commitment. The first charge was a possession of a fire firearm and a controlled substance–weed, pills. Here in Oak Ridge, if you need more help for your work they …

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Angela Perry's comment, July 13, 2015 7:16 PM
I don't see the problem with him staying there if he is willing to take what he learns to rehabilitate himself. At least he is off of the streets not committing any crimes. I know the tax payers are paying but this keeps another thug off the street and maybe he will get rehabilitated to not come back. I see that he has been in and out since he was 12 but it could be possible that he can learn a lesson and not go back and have something on his adult record.
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 20, 2015 7:40 AM
This juvenile knows what is at stake if he messes up again. He is smart and knows the consequences for certain actions, and he knows how to get ahold of firearms off the streets. He knows that if he becomes a repeat offender, he will end up like his dad. I hope that this individual can turn his life around. Many times juveniles (especially boys) act out because they lacked a father figure in their life, which is a huge loss for young boys. We have learned that juveniles who grow up without a parent or have a rough home life, decide to act out for attention or because they don't know any better and it has become a routine or habit.
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Obama Administration Mandates Diversity In Suburbs

Obama Administration Mandates Diversity In Suburbs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
HUD issued a rule to withhold housing funding for cities that don't remove local zoning that limits low-income housing in wealthy neighborhoods.
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The New York Stock Exchange has a long history of shutdowns

The New York Stock Exchange has a long history of shutdowns | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A brief rundown of glitches and errors on Wall Street.
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Accounting executive set for sentencing in Madoff fraud case

Accounting executive set for sentencing in Madoff fraud case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (AP) — A 79-year-old New York accounting firm executive who worked for some of Bernard Madoff's most important clients is likely to receive leniency at his sentencing in return for government cooperation. Paul Konigsberg is set for sentencing Thursday in Manhattan federal court after pleading guilty last year to conspiracy and falsifying books and records.
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The Internet Makes You Think You’re Smarter Than You Are: An Interview with Matthew Fisher

The Internet Makes You Think You’re Smarter Than You Are: An Interview with Matthew Fisher | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Is the ability to look things up online inflating our sense of intelligence?
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Marei Benton's comment, July 10, 2015 2:24 AM
I'm not quite sure that I understood the research methods behind the study (especially when the researcher was discussing how randomization helped evenly distribute the knowledgeable subjects across groups)... Still though I believe that this is true. I use the Internet constantly at work and sometimes I find myself reading journal articles, THINK that I understand them, and then realize about halfway through, I'm not really comprehending and/or retaining... I definitely think that there's a lot to be said about the School of Experience in life... There are definitely things that one has to experience him- or herself in life to be able to truly understand... (I thought that the "Explain how glass is made" question was particularly good.. I mean, who knows how the stuff is actually made? (Something with sand, I think? And then people sometimes blow it??)... Oh well, I suppose we can all continue to be total dumb-dumbs as long as we have access to Google!!
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U.S. heroin use jumps as costs drop, prescription opiate use rises

Heroin overdose deaths in the United States nearly quadrupled between 2002 and 2013, fueled by lower costs as well as increased abuse of prescription opiate painkillers, U.S. health officials said on
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Marei Benton's comment, July 10, 2015 2:27 AM
Heroin will be the death of this country (no pun intended)... Working in the prison system, I must say that it seems like half of everyone there is there for drug charges.
Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, July 13, 2015 5:50 PM

I think drugs are going to be one of the reasons that ruins our youth and its future, people are well aware of the dangers of using drugs but people get so caught up in it that they do not care of the dangers and eventually they get past the point of quitting because they are ruined.  The article states that the overdose deaths have quadrupled within a 11 year period.

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The wisdom of watchdogs

The wisdom of watchdogs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Art of Audit: Eight Remarkable Government Auditors on Stage. By Roel Janssen. Amsterdam University Press; 104 pages; $24.99 and £15.99. WHEN offices handle...
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How the South Skews America

How the South Skews America | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Every year the Fourth of July is marked by ringing affirmations of American exceptionalism. We are a special nation, uniquely founded on high ideals like freedom and equality. In practice, however, much of what sets the United States apart from other countries today is actually Southern exceptionalism. The United States would be much less exceptional...
Rob Duke's insight:

Every since Lot choice the cities on the plain and left Abraham to the hills, we're been fighting this urban vs. rural fight.  It's too simplistic to assign everything that's wrong with America to the South.

 

We'd be less violent? Really?  Have you checked out Chicago lately?

We'd be more tolerant?  Really?  Top 10 hate crime regions: Maine, Washington, Nevada, Connecticut, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Dakota, Michigan, and D.C.  Only 3 of these regions are in the South.

 

http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/most-shocking/10-u-s-states-most-plagued-by-hate-crimes/

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Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 2015 6:55 PM
This debate about the confederate flag is really starting to get on my nerves a bit. It seems that we live in a country full whiny babies. I have absolutely no opinion whatsoever about the confederate flag. I understand its history but I could care less if someone chooses to fly it. I think that its a bit unpatriotic to fly a flag that once represented a severed United States. Anyways, people need to grow up. I saw a truck today with a Seattle Seahawks flag flying in the back.....well that flag offends me greatly, so I think we should ban it.
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NRA-ILA | Brady Campaign "A+" Politician Guilty of Weapons-Related Racketeering

NRA-ILA | Brady Campaign "A+" Politician Guilty of Weapons-Related Racketeering | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Established in 1975, the Institute for Legislative Action (ILA) is the "lobbying" arm of the National Rifle Association of America. ILA is responsible for preserving the right of all law-abiding individuals in the legislative, political, and legal arenas, to purchase, possess and use firearms for legitimate purposes as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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How about a little political corruption today for white collar crime....

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Thomas Piketty has wise words on German hypocrisy and how to solve the Greek debt crisis

“The history of public debt is full of irony,” he said. “It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.
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Police suggest drastic step for Anchorage home neighbors call magnet for crime

Police suggest drastic step for Anchorage home neighbors call magnet for crime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Anchorage Police Department has asked the city to deploy a drastic, rarely-used tool known as criminal abatement if things don't change. The city would go through a judicial process to seize the property from its owner.

The technique is used only in “exceptional circumstances,” said Gary Gilliam, head of the Anchorage Police Department’s Community Action Policing team. He couldn’t think of the last time it was used against a private homeowner.

“You don’t want the government to suddenly come in and take somebody’s property, like right now. There has to be due process. This is huge: You’re taking a man’s home from him.”

Fenner, a former municipal snowplow driver who retired after an on-the-job injury, denies his neighbors' claims. He says they have launched a campaign to harass him with “nonsense” calls to the police.

“I’m not trying to damage the neighborhood,” he said.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a Problem Oriented Policing tool normally reserved for seedy motels, and crack houses....what do you think about it's use here?

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Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 2015 7:33 PM
After reading this article, I am a bit shocked at the number of police calls to one single house. It's obvious that something has to be done, but I'm not sure that seizing his home is the right way to go. I think a force-sale would be more adequate. If he's forced to sell the house, then the new owners can bring respectability back to the property. The guy's defense is pretty pathetic. He honestly thinks that the neighborhood just hates him for no reason? With that much police activity, I would just force him to sell the house or have it seized if he doesn't agree to it.
Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 2015 7:34 PM
A force sale would then make sure that he financially benefits from his investment.
Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, July 13, 2015 6:01 PM

Police say that they have visited this home 51 times in one year, that is a very high response rate to one address.  The whole city is expanding and crime rates are on the rise as well.  Anchorage is a town that people talk about and are beginning to fear because of the daily shootings in Downtown Anchorage and it’s neighborhoods.    It is obvious that something needs to be done to fix problems like this but I imagine very difficult to do so. 

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Woman Shot, Killed at SF Pier Reportedly Wasn't Intended Target

Woman Shot, Killed at SF Pier Reportedly Wasn't Intended Target | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police said there doesn't appear to be a connection between the suspect and victim, Kate Steinle.
Rob Duke's insight:

He was trying to shoot sea lions? WTH?

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Angela Perry's comment, July 6, 2015 8:51 PM
This is truly a sad story and all because of some failed communication. First I want to know how Mr. Sanchez didn't know that he shot someone. Then to come back and say that you were shooting at sea lions. A sea lion? What in the world would you be trying to shoot at sea lions from a busy pier anyways. Deported 5 times and still made it back into the US. They should use this man to find out how he keeps making it back into the US and use this intell to stop further illegal immigrants from entering the US. I mean he has done it so many times i sure he could find his way back with his eyes closed. I understand that everyone wants to be an American and live the AMERICAN life but for crying out loud just do it the proper way. As for the miscommunication that went on, i think this is a common occurrence that goes on more so than not. Because if the communication was there mishaps like this would not be reported on like they are so often. One or two I can understand but the reporting of failed communication between agencies is not so few and far between. I do like how the Steinle family is trying not to dwell on the deportation of Mr Sanchez because they know it is not going to bring back their dear daughter Kate.