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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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California Legalized Selling Food Made At Home And Created Over A Thousand Local Businesses

California Legalized Selling Food Made At Home And Created Over A Thousand Local Businesses | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A government official appears at a man’s door. The man has been breaking the law: He has sold bread baked at home. This isn’t a page from Kafka—it happened to Mark Stambler in Los Angeles.
Rob Duke's insight:

What do you think--is it ridiculous to have to have a law that allows one to make food at home?

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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 16, 2014 6:31 PM
Its unnecessary to attack a local food maker if no complaints where made to the health department and no cases of food poising. Its a scary thought what the FDA is able to get away with approving to put in food that are available for consumption in the U.S. I can see the law is there to prevent food poising, but at the same time if someone chooses to buy food from a person, they also choose to accept responsibility if it messes up their gastro track, let that be between seller and buyer, a third party should not be involved at such a low level. The caps on what you can make as far as profit is not great, although I compared the california to Michigan cottage law, and at least california has a higher cap. Michigan's law prevents you from making a living off it, and instead just a hobby. This law also goes against people who may want to offer healthier food options for people. You can sell bake goods, but not soy based products like Tempeh which is a meat alternative. I just think it is unnecessary for the health department to be so involved, at a small level.
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 18, 2014 8:43 PM
I don't see the problem with at home baking at then selling your product. What about people at small fairs or holiday bazaars? I doubt they have to go through a bunch of hoops to sell their baked goods. If so, I doubt many people would do it. I understand why the health department would want to get involved, because of certain codes and procedures. But, once they saw nothing was wrong they should have continued to let the man sell his bread. I'm glad that in the end there was a positive outcome, and these people are allowed to sell baked goods from their home.
Katrina Miller's comment, December 3, 2014 3:53 AM
Look, if a producer is willing to gain the materials and put in the labor to create some good (I really don't care what it is), and a consumer is willing to purchase the good and run the risk of malfunction of added health hazards, let the transaction occur. Both parties are on a higher utility curve due to the transaction, which is exactly what the free-market facilitates.
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How to lie with indices

How to lie with indices | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“CROOKS already know these tricks. Honest men must learn them in self-defence,” wrote Darrell Huff in 1954 in “How to Lie With Statistics”, a guide to...
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'No porn or prostitution': Islamic extremists set up Sharia law controlled zones in British cities

'No porn or prostitution': Islamic extremists set up Sharia law controlled zones in British cities | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Islamic extremists have launched a poster campaign across the UK proclaiming areas where music, alcohol, gambling, drugs, porn and prostitution are banned.
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Family Time on Prison Buses

Family Time on Prison Buses | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A little-known network of buses and vans takes people from New York City to visit relatives in prisons scattered in small towns across the state.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Why Are There Up to 120,000 Innocent People in US Prisons? | VICE News

Why Are There Up to 120,000 Innocent People in US Prisons? | VICE News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a criminal justice system many say is broken, false confessions and plea bargains spurred by oppressive sentencing laws have put thousands of innocent people behind bars.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Mamie Davis's comment, November 10, 2014 6:55 PM
I wholeheartedly believe this a true account of the number of innocents who "confess" or plead guilty to a crime they didn't commit. All because of a percieved power imbalance and lack of guidance as in the case of Santana or because the "offender" has no recollection of his action from the night before due to a blackout state of alcohol consumption such as in the case of the Fairbanks Four. Statistics show that suspects who lack memory of the event, or are young adults are far more likely to confess to something they didn't do. In this case it is in the police's best interest to tread carefully to prevent a false confession. Unless, of course, the article is correct and the criminal justice system isn't looking for truth or justice but just trying to move people through the system quickly and efficiently. However, I felt that the article's statement that "A 1969 Supreme Court ruling made it legal for cops to lie to suspects in pursuit of confessions, and Hartigan took full advantage" painted the police in a bad light and didn't effectively explain the rules of interrogation which police must abide by. They cannot lie make promises to suspects that they themselves cannot keep, for example "you won't go to jail if you tell the truth". They also can't continue to question a suspect once they have requested counsel. So while this article is mainly on point, it fails to look deeper into criminal justice rules and safeguards.
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Meet The Student Photographers Documenting The School-To-Prison Pipeline

Meet The Student Photographers Documenting The School-To-Prison Pipeline | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In Washington, D.C.'s public schools, African-American students are almost six times as likely to be suspended or expelled as their white classmates. Students with disabilities are also disciplined at higher rates than their peers.

But a group of ...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 11, 2014 9:58 PM
It's still amazes me that in 2014 we still have a lot of racism. It's unfortunate that these kids feel like they are already in prison while they are in school. After seeing the pictures, I'm shocked! Growing up in Fairbanks, our schools were nothing like that. I had heard about schools in the lower 48 having the scanners, but seeing them makes it much more real. It's great that there is a program for these children and that they have a place to go for support and to have their voice heard. I hope that with these photos, that things will start to change in these schools. These children are going to school to get an education, not to feel what prison is like.
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Neighbors’ Were Arguing Over Dog Poop Before Alleged Double Stabbing

Neighbors’ Were Arguing Over Dog Poop Before Alleged Double Stabbing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police said a fight between neighbors over unscooped dog poop on private property escalated to a brutal double stabbing in Springfield Saturday.
Rob Duke's insight:

Yep, fighting over dog poop.  A little ADR here could have saved some serious injuries.  Cops need to learn mediation and we need a system where resources are made available for mediation centers to create capacity in communities.

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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, November 10, 2014 10:48 PM

This article makes me think of a dog pooping in my yard story while the owner was oblivious or just didn't care to notice! Now maybe its not appropriate to share something funny because this guy tried to kill this woman, holy cow, over poop! People really have some scary issues... Do we need to watch what we say or we might get stabbed? When I lived in WA I pulled into my driveway at 8am and it was a warm morning and the sun was shining bright when this guy had his dog leash extended as far as it could extend while he was enjoying his cup of coffee  and his dog was pooping in my grass! I thought are you kidding me, lets be funny about this... I said good morning hows it going? I was thinking about walking up the street with my dog in a few minutes with my morning cup of coffee in one hand and I am going to look at your house while my dog poops in your grass... He said, well what kind of dog do you have? I said a Saint Bernard... His face was so funny so I just laughed... I was amused, who does that? LOL But this article is not a laughing matter, there is some scary people out there.

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JP Morgan Chase Paid $9 Billion to Keep This Woman Silent About Its Crimes

JP Morgan Chase Paid $9 Billion to Keep This Woman Silent About Its Crimes | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Whistleblower Alayne Fleischman has told all to journalist Matt Taibbi.
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 11, 2014 10:04 PM
If only more people could be like this woman. It takes a lot of courage to go against your job to report criminal actions. Especially because many of these big companies WILL pay you to keep quiet. It's great that she went with her morals, to try and get it all straightened out. Big companies are always trying to sweep their mistakes under the rug like nothing happened. If this had happened to a smaller business that couldn't afford to sweep it under the rug, they would have been held criminally accountable.
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ADHD Brains Are the Most Creative: Why Do We Treat It Like a Disability?

ADHD Brains Are the Most Creative: Why Do We Treat It Like a Disability? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Research shows that people who have ADHD are often extremely creative. Yet our schools and society fail them.

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Mandy Burris's comment, November 7, 2014 12:36 AM
My brother has ADHD and struggled in school until he hit high school and could begin to focus on certain types of classes and learning over others. He was one of his art teacher’s favorite students and quickly learned everything Mr. Ressel could teach him, but struggled in math and biology. Given time and practice he was able to focus and became an honor roll student, but it was not easy. That being said, he is much better at mechanical things and artistic undertakings than me, the consistent honor and AP student. I don’t see ADHD as a disability or a detriment by itself, but can become almost debilitating if the person with it does not have support to learn how to work with it.
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We should stop putting women in jail. For anything.

We should stop putting women in jail. For anything. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Women suffer disproportionately in a system built for men.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Mamie Davis's comment, November 10, 2014 7:08 PM
I don't believe that this reform should be solely aimed at women. I think everything in this article could apply to men too. I worry that completely shutting down women's prisons would require housing the worst women psychopaths in facilities for men. I am completely against this, I feel that women convicts and such a powerless position that they can be taken advantage of by almost anyone in the system which should be avoided at all costs. Maybe reducing the number of womens prisons and shifting the large numbers of non-violent offenders to rehabilitation programs would better serve the community.
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Families Rejoice As California Votes To Release All Non Violent Drug War Prisoners - Liberty Crier

Families Rejoice As California Votes To Release All Non Violent Drug War Prisoners - Liberty Crier | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California just voted to release all their drug prisoners and will no longer allow felony convictions for drugs! Wow and Wow! Peace, Love and NeverGetBusted. California approved a major shift against mass incarceration on Tuesday in a vote that could […]

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 7, 2014 3:47 AM
I wonder will the people who will currently be released under this law get their felonies turned into misdemeanors? Also I see where this is set up to limit the incarceration rates which is great, but are there rehabilitation programs in place to help these people transition back into society? Like applying back into the job market? I think its a great step forward for California, but there needs to be a strong support system in place or there is a risk of recidivism and people committing a crime from the culture they learned in prison.
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How Guy Fawkes became the face of post-modern protest

How Guy Fawkes became the face of post-modern protest | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ON NOVEMBER 5TH Britons up and down the country will light bonfires and set off fireworks to mark the execution of Guy Fawkes, a 17th-century Roman Catholic...
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 7, 2014 3:24 AM
A penny for the guy? It seems like there was a decent amount of demonstrators who turned out for the event. I can see it where this group is using it as a representation of discord with the current government. However protest should remain peaceful. If you go on the Daily Mail website you can find pictures of protestors and clashes with police. Last year’s London march saw more than 2,500 protesters take to the streets, in a rally which saw fireworks thrown at Buckingham Palace and a total of 15 arrests.  
Mamie Davis's comment, November 10, 2014 7:16 PM
It's amazing how one generation can see a person as a terrorist, willing to commit harm to state official and in subsequent generations the terrorists image is changed to become one of the activist, someone fighting for social change. I suppose it all depends on the person writing history and running things. Today, more than ever, the people are able to take charge to fight for social change and social justice. The government is no longer seen as the large parent system taking care of its children-citizens. The government of today has been proven to be as corrupt as every normal human being, and the people no longer place blind faith in the actions and word of officials. This environment allows a symbol like Guy Fawkes to rise and become a symbol for those fighting injustice or fighting for a social change.
Rob Duke's comment, November 12, 2014 2:01 AM
Yup. John Brown is another example....
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Sex Crimes Litigation as Hazardous Duty: Practical Tools for Trauma-Exposed Prosecutors, Defense Counsel, and Paralegals by Evan R. Seamone :: SSRN

Sex Crimes Litigation as Hazardous Duty: Practical Tools for Trauma-Exposed Prosecutors, Defense Counsel, and Paralegals by Evan R. Seamone :: SSRN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Criminal attorneys suffer symptoms of Secondary Traumatic Stress at greater levels than mental health clinicians. This article investigates the effects of atto
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New FBI definition increases Alaska's already high rape rate

New FBI definition increases Alaska's already high rape rate | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The FBI has released its 2013 crime statistics, and while a revised definition of rape has increased the rape rate in Alaska and nationwide, an official said people should not assume the increase reflects an actual increase of violence.
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Thomas Piketty’s “Capital”, summarised in four paragraphs

Thomas Piketty’s “Capital”, summarised in four paragraphs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IT IS the economics book taking the world by storm. "Capital in the Twenty-First Century", written by the French economist Thomas Piketty, was published in French...
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The tragedy of physician-assisted suicide

The tragedy of physician-assisted suicide | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a heartbreaking situation, Brittany Maynard's choice to die seems tragic.

Via NANCY PETERS
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NANCY PETERS's comment, November 11, 2014 11:49 PM
Thank you for that comment Kimberly. I try to see death as coming home and a part of living rather than dwelling on the tragedy. I thought Brittany was very brave though and I understand most people who request assisted suicide do not go through with it.
Hugo Elvis's curator insight, November 14, 2014 4:39 AM

L'histoire d'une femme américaine agée de 29 ans et gravement malade. Recours au suicide assisté, article avec une réaction sur le plan religieux et moral.

Hugo Elvis's comment, November 28, 2014 4:33 AM
guiguhi
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Why Indians love cricket

Why Indians love cricket | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
TO OUTSIDERS, the magnitude of Indians' love for cricket is as incomprehensible as its feverish intensity. On February 4th India awarded the Bharat Ratna, its highest civilian honour, to Sachin Tendulkar, a recently retired batsman. Millions in India, a country of 1.3 billion people and only one nationally-popular game, celebrated wildly. When India's national side plays a big game, an estimated 400m watch on television. Yet cricket's take-off in India is a highly improbable development. The game is demanding to play properly, requiring space, a good turf pitch and expensive equipment—which only a relative handful of Indian cricketers have access to. Most will never strap on pads or bowl with a leather ball. So why do they so love the game?

 

Tags: sport, popular culture, culture, development, India, South Asia, globalization, empire.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 3:25 PM

This article is interesting because it shows how a sport can unite an entire country.  Cricket, which is an English game very similar to the American game of Baseball, is highly popular in India.  The game that was brought to the country by the English colonizers and then played by rich Indians eventually became a populist sport.  As the article states, the explosion of TVs in the country greatly aided in spreading the sport across the country, in fact 400 million people are estimated to watch when the Indian National Team plays.  The most interesting fact to me is that a sport used by colonizers has become a way for the people who were colonized to express themselves.  In some ways, Cricket is very closely associated with India today.  There was even a Disney movie, "Million Dollar Arm", in which Indian Cricket players are transformed into American Baseball pitchers.  Today, it is clear that the sport of Cricket is more closely linked with India, than with England who created the sport.  Also show cased, is the power sports can have in society to unite a nation.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, April 6, 4:40 PM

The Indian culture has a peculiar love for a tough game, cricket. The game requires large space with the correct turf, expensive equipment, and a good amount of skill. India has not always been heavily involved in cricket, it is a relatively new sport. When the British colonial rulers of the 19th century started playing cricket on Indian grounds, some ambitious Indians wanted to play for themselves. This is the only sport to generate such a high prestige in India. Mass media is now rapidly expanding the growth of the game, the biggest being television. Some Indian families acquired a television in order to follow cricket. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:29 PM

India played a smart game.  They were deemed civilized enough to rule themselves.  The game of cricket was a game the Indian elites played because they realized the political importance of it.  Smart, smart, smart.  From British colonialism, things have stuck like Parliament and cricket.  Smart Indians or smarter British?  

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Prison Destroys Families and Communities at Society's Expense

Prison Destroys Families and Communities at Society's Expense | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In this excerpt from Locked Down, Locked Out, Maya Schenwar delves into the damage wrought by prison on families.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Miriam Scurrah's curator insight, November 11, 2014 6:51 AM

"Prison's role in society, the logic goes, is to toss away the bad eggs so they can't poison us—so we don't even have to see them. With those eggs cleared, we seamlessly close up the gaps and carry on, clean and whole. The surprise pops up when the broken seams are revealed—the way that incarceration rips open new holes in the social fabric of families and communities outside, severing intricate networks strung together in ways that are observable only upon their breaking. Instead of eggs, we are tossing away people's mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, brothers, sisters, partners, friends."


Time to say enough is enough. It's broken and can not be fixed, too many people in there who are not dangerous or evil, who are not a threat to the safety of the community. Instead many are broken by the experience and the every day abuse of human rights which occurs inside. The innocent on the outside, family and friends, are punished as well, by a prison system which has no respect for families or people.

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Inside a CCA private prison: Two slaves for the price of one, Part Three

Inside a CCA private prison: Two slaves for the price of one, Part Three | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Since CCA’s founding in 1983, the incarcerated population has risen by more than 500 percent to more than 2.2 million people. Some people would say that I am taking a risk exposing the truth about ...

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Laughing at the humourless

Laughing at the humourless | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
No laughing matter “IF I were a cow, I would be wearing a bra,” goes a lyric in a popular song about Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of Islamic State (IS). This...
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, November 10, 2014 10:55 PM

If you can't laugh at this crazy jazz then forget about it! "Naked utters" LOL...  I can't believe that these kind of things are happening in the world right now. i hope it will end at some point..

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How Did The FBI Break Tor?

How Did The FBI Break Tor? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
If you control enough of the Tor network, it’s possible to get a kind of bird’s eye view of the traffic being routed through it. It was clear that Tor thought the Carnegie Mellon researchers were responsible. The researchers refused to talk to the press, but a conference spokesperson told Reuters the talk was canceled because the researchers hadn’t cleared the release of their work through their department, the Software Engineering Institute, which is funded by the Defense Department.

 

At the time, many assumed that the university pulled the plug on the talk because of the gray legal zone it was in, with the researchers casually intercepting Web traffic. But maybe it got pulled because the researchers were revealing a law enforcement technique that the government did not want publicized. If nothing else, it’s highly likely the information the researchers collected about “drug dealers and child pornographers” made its way into law enforcement hands. McCord said he was “unable to comment on the matter.” Carnegie Mellon’s SEI declined comment about the canceled talk and about whether it had provided information from the research to law enforcement.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=TOR

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 7, 2014 3:50 PM
If you control enough of the Tor network, it’s possible to get a kind of bird’s eye view of the traffic being routed through it. It was clear that Tor thought the Carnegie Mellon researchers were responsible. The researchers refused to talk to the press, but a conference spokesperson told Reuters the talk was canceled because the researchers hadn’t cleared the release of their work through their department, the Software Engineering Institute, which is funded by the Defense Department.


At the time, many assumed that the university pulled the plug on the talk because of the gray legal zone it was in, with the researchers casually intercepting Web traffic. But maybe it got pulled because the researchers were revealing a law enforcement technique that the government did not want publicized. If nothing else, it’s highly likely the information the researchers collected about “drug dealers and child pornographers” made its way into law enforcement hands. McCord said he was “unable to comment on the matter.” Carnegie Mellon’s SEI declined comment about the canceled talk and about whether it had provided information from the research to law enforcement.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=TOR


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Feds Shutter Illegal Drug Marketplace Silk Road 2.0, Arrest 26-Year-Old San Francisco Programmer

Feds Shutter Illegal Drug Marketplace Silk Road 2.0, Arrest 26-Year-Old San Francisco Programmer | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Federal authorities have shut down Silk Road 2.0 and other anonymous narcotics marketplaces in what seems to be a coordinated global sting.

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 6, 2014 3:27 PM

Federal authorities have shut down Silk Road 2.0 and other anonymous narcotics marketplaces in what seems to be a coordinated global sting.


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http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=TOR



Mandy Burris's comment, November 7, 2014 12:51 AM
I’m sure that Benthall doesn’t feel like he did anything wrong and that he was making money protesting the tyranny of a society that does not allow dangerous and addictive drugs to be used recreationally. As long as there are people willing to be the keystone in endeavors like this we will have to continue to become more creative in how to catch these people and stop the import of those drugs. Sounds like the international cooperation on this investigation could be very interesting to observe and understand.
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Cultural Politics

Cultural Politics | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A state-by-state look at our cultural politics.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:23 PM

While this doesn't say everything about the state of cultural politics in the United States, it does lay out some of the more ideologically charged debates in the new political landscape after the midterm electionsWhat does this Venn diagram say about the state of cultural politics in your state?   The Courts have aided the push for same sex marriages; will that also occur for marijuana legalization?


Tags: narcotics, sexuality, USA, electoral, political.

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A new way to help meth addicts stay clean: antibodies

A new way to help meth addicts stay clean: antibodies | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Designing medications and immune therapies that blunt a drug addict's high and help him kick his habit is a promising idea. And someday soon it is expected to yield actual medications for addiction. But there's a fundamental problem with prescribing an addict a daily medication that makes it impossible to get high: when the urge to use overwhelms the urge to quit — as it so often does — the struggling addict can easily discontinue the medication and go back to his illicit habit.
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Mandy Burris's comment, November 6, 2014 11:54 PM
This is fascinating! I think that if this works as well on people as it does on mice that it may be a huge step to assisting addicts on the road to recovery. I think that if there is no dopamine release then the addict will not slip back and have to start all over again.
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Take it or leave it

Take it or leave it | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Signal fading BY LAW, ALL public buildings in Iran must have prayer rooms. But travelling around the country you will find few shoes at prayer time outside these...
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, November 6, 2014 12:24 AM
It is really upset when religion gets replaced by material things. I think it happens everywhere nowadays, not only in Iran. Speaking of corruption, in this article we can clearly see an example of internal corruption when money become more important than people’s spirituality. It is very upsetting, especially when it’s happening not only in Iran. I like how southern European diplomat says: “everyone professes to believe, but in private we cheat on our taxes and our wives.”