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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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How to Convince Someone They've Committed a Crime

How to Convince Someone They've Committed a Crime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new study finds that providing true details mixed with a fake event convinces two in three the story was real.
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DNA Solves 1981 Murder of 17-Year-Old Duluth Woman

DNA Solves 1981 Murder of 17-Year-Old Duluth Woman | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Investigators have finally solved the 1981 murder of 17-year-old Carolyn Andrew. They said new technology led them to a DNA match, Cecil Wayne Oliver. Police said Oliver killed himself in 1988 at the age of 30.
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Alaska state senator: Make NYC's Central Park a wilderness area

Alaska state senator: Make NYC's Central Park a wilderness area | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Anchorage Republican lawmaker has a suggestion for where President Barack should look for America's next wilderness area.
Rob Duke's insight:

Have some Fed BLM cops stopping people and writing tickets for feeding squirrels out of season....

 

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'Peaceful School' conference: Justice, empathy and equity in classrooms

'Peaceful School' conference: Justice, empathy and equity in classrooms | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Saint Mary's lecturer Dr. Toni Antoinette Johns keynote speaker for 2015
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Psychology: the man who studies everyday evil

Psychology: the man who studies everyday evil | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Why are some people extraordinarily selfish, manipulative, and unkind? David Robson asks the scientist delving into the darkest sides of the human mind.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Rob Duke's insight:

Dirty deeds done dirt cheap?

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Destine Edgeworth's comment, February 3, 3:50 PM
That's kind of scary to think about since I myself am defiantly a night owl.
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Pedestrian Bell: The Urban Gadget We’ve Been Waiting For

Pedestrian Bell: The Urban Gadget We’ve Been Waiting For | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Living in an urban area has all sorts of advantages, but every urbanite knows the frustration of moving through a crowded street or on a busy sidewalk when you're in a hurry. A couple from Tokyo comes up with a long-awaited solution — a little bell for pedestrians to notify others they have to go out of the way.
Rob Duke's insight:

And now, from the Tokyo office....

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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, February 3, 5:46 PM
This is a really neat idea, but also incredibly hilarious. I don't even think that this is something that we should have. First of all, people who are running for exercise shouldn't be doing it on crowded streets. They should do that in a park, or a gym-a place that is meant for that sort of thing. Second, dividing the streets into two lanes- one for people using their phones, and a fast lane??? This is crazy! I absolutely hate it when people are walking and staring into their phones, it should be illegal or something. Many times, in a crowded street there isn't a lot of room for people to move anyway. If someone rings a bell, I doubt that people will be likely to move out of the way. Most people are just as selfish and in a hurry as the next to get to their destination. So, why would they move out of the way for you?
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Saudi women’s rights activist freed after she promises to ‘reduce her activities’

Saudi women’s rights activist freed after she promises to ‘reduce her activities’ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A woman who co-founded the Saudi Liberal Network Internet discussion group with blogging activist Raef Badawi has been freed after about three months in prison, her daughter said on Sunday.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Debate Persists Over Diagnosing Mental Health Disorders, Long After ‘Sybil’

Debate Persists Over Diagnosing Mental Health Disorders, Long After ‘Sybil’ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
After the book and film “Sybil” were released, diagnoses of multiple personality disorder skyrocketed. Was it more awareness by doctors, or overdiagnosis?
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What are British values? - The Guardian

What are British values? - The Guardian | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Open thread: Historian David Starkey has said British values include “drunkenness and self-loathing”. We want your view

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Today in history: Physiognomy and advice for men who wish to "take a wife"

Today in history: Physiognomy and advice for men who wish to "take a wife" | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

From Vaught’s Practical Character Reader, published in 1902 and revised in 1907, by Emily H. Vaught. There are some wonderful illustrations here (thesocietypages.org) from a book published by Emily H Vaught in 1902. It is about using physiognomy to assess the character of others. I particularly l...


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Megan Earle's comment, February 2, 5:46 PM
I took a deviance and social control course a few semesters ago where we looked at the traits and head shapes Lombroso decided defined a criminal. I found it shocking that these ideas were taken seriously with no significant scientific background. I find it even more appalling that the same ideas were applied to women to dictate whether or not they'd be a reliable mother.
Rob Duke's comment, February 2, 5:48 PM
Yes, it's a little frightening to think how recent these ideas were followed.
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Elizabeth Warren Proposes Replacing Payday Lenders With The Post Office

Elizabeth Warren Proposes Replacing Payday Lenders With The Post Office | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
By offering basic financial services currently provided by predatory lenders, the postal service could save the poor billions and fill its own budget hole.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Texas Legislature Introduces Bill Allowing Teachers To Shoot Students

Texas Legislature Introduces Bill Allowing Teachers To Shoot Students | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I predict this will not end well.
Rob Duke's insight:

Maybe we should start with a spanking...?

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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, February 2, 12:57 AM
It's extremely frustrating to see that this Act is even being introduced in the first place. We will definitely be seeing more issue like the Trayvon Martin cases, where deadly force was thought to be necessary. I think it is also interesting to see that students of color have a higher rate of disciplinary actions than white students. It is crazy that racism is still prevalent in today's society, have we really come that far? I think not.
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, February 3, 5:56 PM
All I can say is Wow! This is absolutely crazy, and I wouldn't feel comfortable sending my child to this type of school. Interestingly, race is brought up again in this article. It's hard to believe that in 2015, we are still dealing with discrimination towards different races. I agree with Kaitlyn's comment, that we really haven't come that far. My husband is from Texas, and he has told me stories about getting spanked at the principal's office. They had a choice between OCS (On campus suspension) or "swats." I thought this was crazy and hilarious (he was a junior or senior in high school), because I didn't realize that this still went on in some states. But, I think that allowing teachers to use force when necessary is unacceptable. This isn't a power that teachers should get to have, because not only can things get out of hand quickly but I don't believe that teachers have this kind of authority. We should just stick to the traditional suspensions- and I suppose spanking if in the state of Texas..
Courtney Thompson's comment, February 4, 12:04 PM
This is absolutely outrages to even consider let alone actually propose. I could understand trying to pass a bill for teachers to be allowed to have firearms on campus in case of an intruder, do to all of the recent school shootings, but to use against their own students is absurd. Really the only people that should have guns on campus are any police officers that are there to keep the campus safe. I worry for the future if this is where we are heading. The consequences of passing this bill would be dire.
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The Toddlers Are on to You

The Toddlers Are on to You | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new study suggests children as young as 13 months understand more about social interactions and intentions than we'd previously thought.
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Does threat of punishment deter psychopaths? Their brains respond differently, brain scans show

Does threat of punishment deter psychopaths? Their brains respond differently, brain scans show | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The brains of violent offenders with psychopathic personalities don’t process punishment in the same way as other offenders, according to an MRI study.The Daily Beast summarizes the study of
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Colorado is making so much money from cannabis it's having to give some back to citizens

Colorado is making so much money from cannabis it's having to give some back to citizens | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Colorado's marijuana experiment has been an empirically rousing success thus far, with crime down and tourism up, and now the state has collected so much money in tax from sales of pot that it might be legally obliged to give some back.
Rob Duke's insight:

Alaska could use the revenue right now....

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Kyle May's comment, February 5, 7:16 PM
I'm glad that Colorado led the way with this. This study, which is turning out to have more states in support of it, could potentially free up a lot of time within our Justice system. With decrimilization of pot, and legalizing sale - the tax money can help the local area. As you said Rob, Alaska could use this right now. Our economy is suffering from the lack of oil cost. The reduced cost of having police work, court time, and prison time costs being reduced due to Marijuana related crimes.
Raquel Young's comment, February 11, 1:22 AM
You also have to look at the population of colorado. They have a way more people and thats why they are doing so well with the sales.
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What counts as a home and who is really homeless?

What counts as a home and who is really homeless? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
San Francisco's homeless problem has vexed the city for decades and is important enough to the Obama administration that the president sent his chief of staff out to walk the streets last week in the biennial homeless count.

The count determines the level of federal funding so the city g

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Destine Edgeworth's comment, February 3, 4:21 PM
That's crazy that is a lot of kids going without homes.
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, February 3, 5:38 PM
Being homeless is something that I could never imagine, and it is sad that the number is constantly rising. Everyone's situation is different, some of those that are homeless could have probably prevented it, but then there are those who have done everything they could and are still homeless. It is especially sad that there has been an 85% rise in homeless students, even more sad that only 1 in 10 are eligible for federal housing assistance. Children are helpless when it comes to having a home, they shouldn't have to worry about where they are going to sleep, eat, get their clothes etc. They should be focusing on their school and future. I think that more needs to be done for homeless children, as this can really impact them and their future in a negative way. I hope that in the future, legislation does realize that these children need their help and real housing. Hopefully something can be done for the qualifications for children to get housing.
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Americans Think Upward Mobility Is Far More Common Than It Really Is

Americans Think Upward Mobility Is Far More Common Than It Really Is | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Abel Santiago serves a customer at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Santa Monica, California.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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The means to an end

Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. OVER 40,000 Americans committed suicide in 2012: approximately one death...
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Rat Park drug experiment cartoon – Stuart McMillen comics

Rat Park drug experiment cartoon – Stuart McMillen comics | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Comic about a classic experiment into drug addiction science: Rat Park. Would rats choose to take drugs if given a stimulating environment and company?
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File-sharing site The Pirate Bay back online with reports of 'staff' rifts

File-sharing site The Pirate Bay back online with reports of 'staff' rifts | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It's up and running again with a few modifications, though some "staff" aren't exactly happy about it.
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Kyle May's comment, February 2, 3:50 AM
I see pirating as one of those 'grey crimes' such as smoking pot has become nowadays. You're not 'hurting' anyone by doing it, there is no harm done. Yet, it's still illegal. Do not get me wrong, I don't mean to say legalize pot, because it has addictive properties and can potentially lead to addictive nature, but pirating has no addictive nature. It's the transfer of data, of ideas, for free, rather than a monetary transaction. For those who are poor in college, it could make life easier. It is letting you keep the money that you would have spent on the product to save for something else. The opportunity cost is reduced greatly by this. I really do think that this service is a victimless crime.
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The economics of optimism

The economics of optimism | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“THE lives of people in poor countries will improve faster in the next 15 years than at any other time in history. And their lives will improve more than anyone...
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Black teens who commit a few crimes go to jail as often as white teens who commit dozens

Black teens who commit a few crimes go to jail as often as white teens who commit dozens | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How the rise in juvenile detention disproportionately affected black teens.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Kyle May's comment, February 2, 3:12 AM
I think this article is very interesting in outlining how race can impact your sentence. Like in more recent times, there was a young white male who killed 4 people driving under the influence and got off with 10 years probation for being "Rich" and since he was rich, he didn't know the consequences of his actions. (http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/12/12/the-affluenza-defense-judge-rules-rich-kids-rich-kid-ness-makes-him-not-liable-for-deadly-drunk-driving-accident/) If it had been a poor black or hispanic kid, who wasn't "rich" or even if he was - I doubt they would have gotten such leniency.
Megan Earle's comment, February 2, 6:09 PM
Its shocking to me that racial differences are still so influential when it comes to crimes and sentencing. When I read the graph and saw that of white boys who commit 25 crimes, 40% are imprisoned and minority boys who commit the same number, 60% are incarcerated I was shocked. As our society has evolved I would not have thought the discrepancy would be that large still. It shows how far our society still has to go in terms of equality.
Rob Duke's comment, February 2, 6:12 PM
Yes, it shows up again and again in aggregate number research, but when we look at the micro level "does this officer seem to discriminate?"; or, "did this judge not have a reasonable reason for letting this person off light; or strictly enforcing this law?" we can't pinpoint where the discrimination takes place....
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Prisons reach court-ordered inmate levels a year ahead of schedule

Prisons reach court-ordered inmate levels a year ahead of schedule | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California’s prison population has hit the court-ordered benchmark of 137.5 percent of capacity, more than one year before the deadline. Although the population inside the state’s 34 adult prisons fluctuates, the development is seen as a sign that the state is making steady progress toward cutting inmate populations.
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DERRICK NELSON's comment, February 1, 4:21 AM
Finally, an initiative that worked in improving the jail population by decreasing inmate numbers. Proposition 47 impact the community of California by causing the releasing of incarcerated family members back into the population and hopefully be productive members of society.
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A Federal Court Considers Whether We Have a Right to Tell the Truth

A Federal Court Considers Whether We Have a Right to Tell the Truth | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
First Amendment cases often deal with the fringes of free speech, forcing courts to scrutinize expression that might, on first glance, seem pretty worthless. In the last few years, the Supreme Court has constructed constitutional protections for dogfighting videos, funeral protests, violent video games, and outright lies. This month, however,...
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Chad Kaestle's comment, January 31, 4:24 PM
I agree with this line of thinking. If something is proven to be untrue but still is available out there in uncorrected form, it can negatively impact someone's reputation. The press outlets often like to be the first to get the story and put out raw information, and later, when it may no longer be newsworthy, or a correction is in order, they are not always as quick to do so (though some are). I think the California law allowing people to restrict what they wrote prior to turning 18 is good in that, if they said something that could be negatively-construed, it should not necessarily be held against them by an future employer due to their age and inexperience at the time.
DERRICK NELSON's comment, February 1, 4:58 AM
The 1st amendment is a very powerful and controversial issue. It can make things complicated in the realm of what can and should be said. I agree with the article that people should have the right to delete anything on search engines that was published turning out to be false pretenses. This same principle can and should be applied to news presses that released a story prematurely. Another segment should be written debunking the previous one if the subject records became expunged.