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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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Mobster ordered hit on NYPD officer because cop “dared” to marry his ex-wife: prosecutor 

Mobster ordered hit on NYPD officer because cop “dared” to marry his ex-wife: prosecutor  | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Joel (Joe Waverly) Cacace ordered the execution of NYPD Officer Ralp Dols in 1997 because the cop had married the mobster's former wife, Assistant Brooklyn U.S.
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BridgetM's comment, December 4, 2013 6:43 PM
Are mafia's still around? I thought they were replaced by gangs long ago. This article left a lot of information out, so I would like to have seen some more evidence, but these are serious allegations. I'm not sure why someone would care so much about what their ex was doing, but it seems like this guy holds a grudge.
Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:04 PM
His amount of power is rather impressive from behind bars.
Dana Hoffman's comment, December 20, 2013 7:28 PM
Read Melissa's comment, I agree w/her 100%
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Louisiana kidnap victim's cousin kicks down door, shoots and kills abductor

Louisiana kidnap victim's cousin kicks down door, shoots and kills abductor | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A man looking for his abducted cousin kicked in the back door of an abandoned house and shot and killed her kidnapper, authorities in Louisiana said.
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BridgetM's comment, December 4, 2013 6:47 PM
I do not usually believe in using deadly force against someone, but in this situation it seemed hard to avoid. According to the police, the kidnapper was actively stabbing the victim so I think in the heat of the moment a natural reaction may have been to stop the person from hurting the victim by any means possible. My main argument against the use of deadly force is that is can be used unnecessarily, but this situation is one in which I think that was probably the only way to stop the assault.
Brix Hahn's comment, December 19, 2013 11:47 PM
This is awesome and so encouraging to see. I think it’s so rare that we see how much a victim can do in self-defense. It’s nice to see a victim not be so much of a victim. This is awesome and so encouraging to see. I think it’s so rare that we see how much a victim can do in self-defense. It’s nice to see a victim not be so much of a victim.
Brix Hahn's comment, December 19, 2013 11:47 PM
This is awesome and so encouraging to see. I think it’s so rare that we see how much a victim can do in self-defense. It’s nice to see a victim not be so much of a victim. This is awesome and so encouraging to see. I think it’s so rare that we see how much a victim can do in self-defense. It’s nice to see a victim not be so much of a victim.
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How did graffiti become respectable?

How did graffiti become respectable? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FOR old school graffiti taggers, it may be the final proof that commercialism is destroying their proud culture. Justin Bieber, the Canadian singer, has been accused...
Rob Duke's insight:

Interesting insights of how below the surface experimentation can be coopted by mainstream culture after it proves to serve a wider purpose.

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Cindy Slats's comment, November 16, 2013 1:36 AM
If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. And a sure-fire way to make purveyors of graffiti lose interest in the whole thing, make it mainstream.
Ashley Bartolowits's comment, November 16, 2013 5:57 PM
This is very interesting, I have seen the crack down on graffiti they are talking about, when I was living in Oregon I saw a sign that had been tagged in the morning on my way to school and by that evening on my way home it had already been replaced with a fresh sign. Consider the scrawled dirty joke on a trashy bathroom stall versus a freshly painted mural on the side of a city building that had been splashed by a bucket of red paint. Both are obviously graffiti but seeing the two cases makes me feel so differently. Seeing something that has taken time, effort and care being defaced is so sad.
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Lessons From European Prisons

Lessons From European Prisons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
American corrections officials look overseas for a better approach to creating a system geared toward social reintegration rather than punishment alone.
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James Greer's comment, November 21, 2013 6:41 PM
To Robert Tanner: It's awesome you're willing to give new ideas a chance--but I'm curious what foundations of family and belief you are talking about that differ between the US and Europe. I'm sure that families over there suffer just as much heart ache when a loved one is hurt/killed/affected by a crime as we are over here. As far as "which" criminals we should be trying to rehabilitate instead of punish; why should there be a distinction?
Robert Tanner's comment, November 21, 2013 7:20 PM
Having lived in Europe, the family structure and value are much different. The core of the society is much different. For example, elderly family members live with their children, not homes. They have a greater value of family. So they can appreciate the time spent with family. Not universal, but in general
Robert Tanner's comment, November 21, 2013 7:21 PM
Some criminals are more violent and cannot be rehibilitated. The first step in reform is the want.
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Holder Looks for Answers on Overcrowded Prisons

Holder Looks for Answers on Overcrowded Prisons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The nation's top law enforcement officer got a glimpse of the challenges facing ex-offenders attempting to rebuild their lives on Tuesday as he attended an unusual court session and then met with several of them afterward.
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Ruth O'Neal's comment, November 8, 2013 12:10 AM
I think this is great way into saving money for prisons and helping older ex-offenders on their feet. Some do become homeless because of their financial situation. Overcrowding is a huge problem in prisons and if there were programs in other prisons such as this one, I’m sure it would make a huge difference.
Ricky Osborne's comment, November 13, 2013 11:18 PM
Too may resources are being spent on putting people in prison and not enough on preventing crime. Its great to see a program try an alternative method in preventing crime and recidivism. Hopefully this is a positive step towards relieving our overcrowded prisons so they can become more manageable.
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The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think

The Man Who Would Teach Machines to Think | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Douglas Hofstadter, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Gödel, Escher, Bach, thinks we've lost sight of what artificial intelligence really means. His stubborn quest to replicate the human mind.
Rob Duke's insight:

If only we understood how consciousness worked....

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Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:21 PM
This article reminds me of Descartes, Dennet, and Chalmers... Indeed before we can help robots become thinkers they must become conscious, and we (as a species) are all experts on consciousness, yet none of us can define our consciousness.
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A shrinking slice

A shrinking slice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IMAGINE the proceeds of economic output as a pie, crudely divided between the wages earned by workers and the returns accrued to the owners of capital, whether as...
Rob Duke's insight:

Trade, Reason, and Force are the three components of influence.  We often focus on force/coercion as the only bad component of the three.  How can a free trade or reasoned debate be bad?  This is one example of a subtle balance shift from workers to capitalists through profit, interests, and rents.  When the deal is fair, no problem, but steadily the deal seems to be eroding with social problems as an inevitable result.  How long can we ignore this issue?  See Alberto Guerriero Ramos, David Ricard, and Gordon Tullock for more discussions on this issue, rents, and rent-seeking behavior.

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Rashaad's comment, November 6, 2013 5:41 PM
This is a very important article from criminology perspective as well. Since the money is being less and less equally distributed over the population and since the differences are increasing, this might lead into problems. first, I think that this phenomenon is partly due to the globalization, as well as the increasing cost of labor in United States. Companies outsource or move their factories to Asia due to cheaper labor and cheaper transportation. This leads to decrease of jobs in the manufacturing industries, leading to unequally distributed wealth, because rich people capitalize on the globalization and poor people have even "less" money. Since they have less money, they might get desperate and commit crime. Also, people from "lower" classes are more likely to commit crime, so the increasing number of poor people would most likely have a negative impact on society and the crime rates.
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Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief'

Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A senior Pakistani Taliban leader has been killed in a suspected US drone strike in the north-west of the country, Taliban sources told the BBC

Via @NewDayStarts
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Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:11 PM
Good intel allowed us to put warheads on foreheads... I think we can all sleep safer tonight.
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Bahrain opposition leader ordered to face prosecutor after protest exhibition raid

Bahrain's main opposition group says its leader has been called to the state prosecutor's office over an exhibition that showed alleged abuses against anti-government protesters in the Gulf nation.
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Pussy Riot inmate 'missing'; Russian officials trying to shut her up?

Pussy Riot inmate 'missing'; Russian officials trying to shut her up? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Pussy Riot's Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, imprisoned in Russia, is "missing," her family says. The member of the punk rock protest group reportedly was being transferred to a new penal colony.
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Rob Duke's comment, November 6, 2013 3:22 AM
She was kinda sorta found to be heading to Siberia....
Rob Duke's comment, November 6, 2013 3:23 AM
IDK, sounds a bit like Fairbanks (e.g. thousands of miles east of Moscow). LOL.
Christie Hampton's comment, November 13, 2013 1:37 AM
I would expect this behavior more out of a country like China. I had believed the Russia was moving more toward a democratic type state since the Soviet block fell. This event, along with the treatment of Snowden is a very scary sign. Russia appears to be moving back to the days of communism.
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NYC Subway Vigilante Goetz Arrested on Drug Charge

NYC Subway Vigilante Goetz Arrested on Drug Charge | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
New York City police say the subway vigilante who shot four panhandling youths on a train in the 1980s has been arrested on drug charges.
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Angie Crow's comment, November 5, 2013 8:16 PM
I found this article to be very fascinating. I don't know much about his other incident in 1984 but in terms of marijuana possession, he definitely deserved to go to prison for it. I think that this article added more about his past instead of focusing on what is going on now. I feel like the past should be the past, even if he did get in to trouble again with the law. He could have been a vigilante before but in this case he needs no recognition. He broke the law and deserves to deal with the consequences.
Rashaad's comment, November 6, 2013 5:56 PM
This article was indeed interesting, and I guess that without more details it is hard to judge him or not. What fascinates me in this case is, that the shooting back in the day was classified as self-defense, but then judge "stripped" him of $43 million for the same thing because one of the kids was paralyzed. I don't get it. He was said to be innocent and that it was self-defense, and then the paralyzed thug wins that court dispute? There is no question about the "pot" story, he simply broke the law (even though in some states it isn't even illegal anymore), but the whole shooting deal is just confusing.
Rashaad's comment, November 6, 2013 5:56 PM
This article was indeed interesting, and I guess that without more details it is hard to judge him or not. What fascinates me in this case is, that the shooting back in the day was classified as self-defense, but then judge "stripped" him of $43 million for the same thing because one of the kids was paralyzed. I don't get it. He was said to be innocent and that it was self-defense, and then the paralyzed thug wins that court dispute? There is no question about the "pot" story, he simply broke the law (even though in some states it isn't even illegal anymore), but the whole shooting deal is just confusing.
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Up to 12 people in custody, possibly linked to immigrant kidnapping

Up to 12 people in custody, possibly linked to immigrant kidnapping | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police say up to a dozen people are in custody in connection to a possible immigrant kidnapping.
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Sawyer Skiba's comment, November 10, 2013 1:45 AM
This is a good example of how people sometimes set themselves up to be victims. The immigrants wanted to sneak into the country illegally, so they associated with people that they knew were breaking the law. In the end it bit them in the butt. It is also obvious that kidnapping is never right, but the immigrants set themselves up to be victims.
Kelly Logue's comment, November 10, 2013 6:49 PM
So many laws are being broken here. Not only are the illegal immigrants being transported , but there are also hostages in this case. Although I agree to an extent with the comment above me, about how the immigrants had it coming; no one should be involved with the subject of being kidnapped and being held against their will. If I was a judge I honestly don't know how I would rule this. I guess I would deport the immigrants back to where they came from, but I would definitely make the kidnappers be charged for both crimes of smuggling immigrants and kidnapping due to the fact that they were housing these illegal immigrants.
Dom Eubank's comment, November 11, 2013 7:22 PM
The thing is that it isn't just American criminals that are committing these crimes, Mexican Coyotes will transport the people into America and demand more money from the families back home and sometimes will even kill the individuals if more payment isn't procured. Immigration laws should be focused on returning the people back to their real countries until they gain Legal and legitimate access to America. Same as any American traveling abroad, making all people here Illegally was a political tactic to gain a majority of the votes and is appalling. With refocused laws we can balance out the system appropriately. .
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Colorado voters deciding how to tax pot

Colorado voters deciding how to tax pot | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, voters decide whether to approve a 15 percent pot excise tax to pay for school construction, plus an extra sales tax of 10 percent to fund marijuana enforcement.
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Brix Hahn's comment, November 1, 2013 9:00 PM
Well it’s about time someone has come to their senses and legalize pot! I mean, think of all the money the Colorado state government is going to have once they get all the taxes figured out, and all the legislation successfully approved. It’s interesting to see a new project like this be born, I mean, on paper it seems like it would be easy to tax the business just as tobacco products and alcohol are taxed.
Joshua Livingston's comment, November 11, 2013 12:55 AM
I’m not someone who likes drugs, but considering marijuana has become so basic in today’s society, taxing it and making that money flow back into the system sounds like a good plane.
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Renisha McBride killed by gun blast to face: medical examiner

Renisha McBride killed by gun blast to face: medical examiner | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The 19-year-old Detroit woman who friends say was seeking help after a car crash was killed by a gun blast to the face, according to an autopsy released Tuesday.
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Cindy Slats's comment, November 18, 2013 2:22 PM
This seems to me like yet another result of living in fear.
Colby Wallace's comment, November 19, 2013 1:56 AM
This is a sad case, This is the reason people do not trust each other anymore. The young woman was just trying to help and paid a horrible price to do so.
James Greer's comment, November 21, 2013 6:21 PM
The 54 year old man sounds like an idiot. I'm sorry to sound harsh, but I just fail to see how anyone will look at a lone 19 year old female standing on your porch, and a) assume she's trying to break into your home, and b) immediately shoot her without making any kind of verbal contact. Since he says he accidentally shot her, and the article didn't mention him shooting through the door, I assume (which should also demonstrate how worthless my insight is into this situation, since I wasn't there) that he opened the door, gun pointed at her to ask a question, and this moron pulled the trigger. So either he's lying, and just panicked and shot her (or hated black people and shot her), or he's completely incompetent and should never have been holding a gun.
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Did Montana newlywed blindfold husband before pushing him off cliff?

Did Montana newlywed blindfold husband before pushing him off cliff? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Montana newlywed may be accused of blindfolding her husband before pushing him off cliff, court documents say.
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Brittany Stahle's comment, November 18, 2013 9:17 PM
This case is very interesting and I do want to know what really happened. She is making herself look very guilty by lying to the police and sending those texts to a friend. it looks as if she was planning the murder out. If it comes out that she did use the blind fold she should be charged with murder. I really would like to see how this plays out.
Brix Hahn's comment, December 19, 2013 11:45 PM
This case is extremely fishy if Jordan blindfolded her husband before she allegedly pushed him off a cliff or not. If she did blindfold him, that adds a new layer of intent and responsibility to the crime, but if she didn’t, then we’re just looking a run of the mill murder trial. I mean, her family said the marriage was weird from the beginning, so maybe there is some extra intent on Jordan’s side.
Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:08 PM
This doesn't pass the smell test, she say's she pushed him, and that it was an accident, and now they found a blindfold... She should have gotten her story straight beforehand.
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California study examines titanic shift in criminal justice

California study examines titanic shift in criminal justice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Stanford Criminal Justice Center's eye-opening report is the first comprehensive look at how those involved in the most sweeping correctional experiment in recent history really feel about it.
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Carlie Bailey's comment, November 15, 2013 12:16 AM
I think that our justice system does need a change and I support California's initiative. I think that there will definitely be some kinks that will need to get worked out, and it will take time before they will be able to see a difference probably. But I think that a change is necessary. I like the GPS tracking device also.
James Greer's comment, November 21, 2013 6:29 PM
I agree that our justice system needs a major overhaul. I think the system should be more focused on solving the problem that is causing people to commit crimes, and helping them get away from that, more than just treating a symptom (incarcerating every person who crosses the road incorrectly). But more interesting is this experiment: when you change the people paying for the system, different people take notice of just how expensive it really is--and how ineffective it has become.
James Greer's comment, November 21, 2013 6:31 PM
To Melissa: I'm not sure how I feel about the death row process. It's better to let a hundred guilty men go free than to execute a single innocent man--in my opinion, and it certainly isn't an original one. On that note, a whole lot of death row inmates have been released lately after being "convicted" when new evidence came to light months, years, sometimes more than a decade after the conviction. So if you remove all of those safeguards, and speed up the process, you remove the chance of that evidence turning up in time.
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Recidivism down, treatment up for Alaska convicts, officials say

Recidivism down, treatment up for Alaska convicts, officials say | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — Alaska convicts have been less likely to reoffend in recent years and more likely to complete in-prison substance abuse treatment programs, state officials told lawmakers on Monday.
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Melissa's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:12 PM

The sign of lowering the number of reoffenders in the jail system is a positive move towards a much needed issue.   The funds given to programs to help and treat offenders when in jail and also while on probation has a postive outcome but still does not fully address the real problem of overcrowding in the alaska jail system.

Jonathan Reed's comment, January 27, 3:16 AM
This is what it comes down too. Shoving people into prisons isn't going to solve the underlining issues that press the community. What needs to be done is that programs need to be created that help and assist newly released inmates in finding jobs and maintain them. Helping them find stable residence and helping them with their personal issues (counseling) are just a few of the things that can be done. But what Alaska is doing to great and I'm surprised that more states aren't doing it. This entire article can be summed up by restated what was said by Alaska Department of Correction Deputy Commissioner Ron Taylor, "the state began to seriously look at recidivism rates with the start of the 2007 report and worked to increase the availability of in-prison treatment as well as provide better services for inmates once they are released. That work has paid off, he said and the completion rates for in-prison substance abuse treatment rose to 65 percent in 2013, up from 45 percent in 2010."
Rob Duke's comment, January 27, 3:19 AM
Agreed: it's not sustainable for one thing and it's just not effective for another.
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Missing Pussy Riot Inmate Feared to be in 'Deep Siberia' | Music News | Rolling Stone

Missing Pussy Riot Inmate Feared to be in 'Deep Siberia' | Music News | Rolling Stone | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nadezhda Tolokonnikova has not been been seen since October 20th
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Ruth O'Neal's comment, November 7, 2013 11:59 PM
I could not imagine being sentenced to prison because of a statement against Putin or for any leader for that matter. For the family not being able to find where their loved one is or not having any knowledge is scary. Personally, I do not think the authorities should have a right to keep information from the family legally. I think that keeping her under the radar could also be a political statement to the people, or kind of a revenge to what happened in Moscow.
Joshua Matheny's comment, November 13, 2013 5:08 PM
This really brings into play the harsh reality of how some more strict areas enforce their prison population. We often times do not consider how lucky we are to have constitutional rights to protect our freedom of speech and how we are taken care of in prisons like this. It is very sad that Pussy Riot was put away in the way they were but I will be honest with you, the way they went about their music and theatrics, they had it coming to them. While I agree with others that the punishment is cruel and unusual, it is not for Russia. We do not live in Russia, things are much different, and far more corrupt their than they are here especially with individual rights.
Zach White's comment, December 20, 2013 7:11 PM
It's unfortunate that she's stuck in some gulag somewhere, but she should have known that messing with PM Putin was a poor life choice.
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Students on the barricades

Students on the barricades | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FOR several hours on October 30th, Bulgaria’s Constitutional Court, the highest judiciary body in the country, was being auctioned on eBay. Before the site took it...
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Ashley Bartolowits's comment, November 4, 2013 11:29 PM
What a clever and stinging way to make a statement! I imaging that this stunt will produce more fuel for the what was the waning protest. Its creative, approachable, humorous, peaceful and bold on a global level. Well done, to whomever's scheme this was.
BridgetM's comment, December 4, 2013 6:53 PM
We see a lot of different populations upset with their government's these days, the U.S. included. It is important to allow people to protest and speak their mind. I can understand their concern for the association between capitalism and democracy, I see the same issues in this country and they only seem to be getting worse. Hopefully we can try to keep a distance between business and politics, but unfortunately, it seems they are more linked than ever now.
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Drone kills Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud; Pakistan accuses U.S. of derailing peace talks

Drone kills Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud; Pakistan accuses U.S. of derailing peace talks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
His death is a victory for the U.S. drone program, but threatens to “sabotage the peace talks’’ between Pakistani officials and militants.

Via InfoBlaze
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Wyndam Childress's comment, November 5, 2013 1:32 PM
I think the notion of peace talks is a little funny. Peace isn't going to happen. Maybe Pakistan will be shown some grace, but not the rest of the world. This esteemed leader of terrorists may have been a pivotal piece to peace talks, but how much worth do peace talks have when at the same time he is threatening attacks on our cities?
Dom Eubank's comment, November 11, 2013 6:59 PM
I agree on the idea that there "may" have been peace talks with the Taliban for Pakistan but that is precisely where it would stop, the US is viewed as an enemy based off of religion alone and the jihadist war is with the WEST. The CIA has been using predator strikes and SEAL teams to cripple the Taliban and it is the only tool that has been effective for the US and the rest of the Western countries. Pakistan has never been very cooperative with the US so I don't take much they say as being true.
Zach White's comment, November 22, 2013 6:59 PM
The problem with going to war with an ideal is that ideals easily cross borders, and rarely wear uniforms. Should the US be careful where we land our ordinance... sure. But I won't lose any sleep over it.
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Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief'

Drone 'kills Pakistan Taliban chief' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Pakistani Taliban's second-in-command has been killed in a suspected US drone strike, a senior militant source tells the BBC.

Via @NewDayStarts
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Melissa's curator insight, November 5, 2013 12:16 AM

I am a strong supporter of drone attacks on terrorist.  This guy killed 9 people in 2009 and should have been killed sooner.  The more terrorist killed the better off Americans are.  They contiue to plan attacks on innocent poeople and spread hate for no logical reason.

 

 

Joshua Livingston's comment, November 11, 2013 12:44 AM
I have no problem with the use of drones to attack people. As much as people want to say that killing is wrong, it comes down to mainly one thing let the other guy die for his country rather than one of our men die for ours.
Michael McColley's comment, November 15, 2013 1:21 AM
I remember hearing about this in the news when it first happened. I think it's good that we got rid of one the top terrorists in the world and especially when how much Pakistani Taliban help the Afghanistan Taliban out over here. Having said that how far does this go though we gonna start using this kind of stuff on American soil cause i bet we do.
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Atlanta man shatters coast-to-coast 'Cannonball Run' speed record

Atlanta man shatters coast-to-coast 'Cannonball Run' speed record | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Atlanta Lamborghini salesman set a coast-to-coast "Cannonball" speed record of 28 hours and 50 minutes in a souped-up Mercedes.
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Kelsey Scott's comment, November 7, 2013 3:11 PM
This is one of those things that we all know is wrong by the books but we're all kind of awed by. They obviously put a lot of planning into it, it might not have been a totally reasonable plan but they did plan. This wasn't just a few idiots in a fast car, they knew what they were getting into. Props to them for getting it done safely, though it would definitely be stupid for anyone else to try it now.
Sawyer Skiba's comment, November 10, 2013 2:07 AM
This is mind blowing. This has to be one of the dumbest people I have ever heard of. First, driving that far and that fast is dangerous. Then, add that he has admitted to it, filmed it, and posted video. I have heard multiple times of similar things like this happening and the person committing the act gets arrested. He also admits to going 150 MPH in numerous areas. While I agree it was probably a blast, this is one of the situations you may want to limit the filming and publicity.
Maria Guadalupe Sutherland's curator insight, November 13, 2013 12:44 PM

WoW! that sounds fun.  Very risky indeed but I'm glad to read that he took a lot of safety precautions.  Even though he hopes no other lunatics will attempt to break his record, I think he might have inspired one or two out there.  I'm sure we will read about someone else in a few years who tries to break his record.

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AP Exclusive: Honduras chief denies death squads

AP Exclusive: Honduras chief denies death squads | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a wide-ranging conversation with The Associated Press that started over lunch at his favorite Tegucigalpa restaurant and ended after a late dinner at his well-appointed home, Bonilla denied he once led a social cleansing campaign, that his...
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Dom Eubank's comment, November 11, 2013 7:11 PM
Of course the General would deny the charges, and he should unless there is substantial evidence pointing to the contrary I would believe what he said was the truth.
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Ga. Police: 10-Year-Old's Body Found in Trash Can

Ga. Police: 10-Year-Old's Body Found in Trash Can | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police say the body of a 10-year-old girl has been found in a trash can at a metro Atlanta apartment complex. Gwinnett County police Sgt.
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Sawyer Skiba's comment, November 10, 2013 1:50 AM
I think it is very interesting that the father said that the daughter drank some type of chemical, but then decided to burn her and put her in a trash can. It seems obvious that the parents had something to do with the daughters death. That is not a normal response. Atleast the father decided to call the police and start to work on bringing the horrible situation to an end.
Kelly Logue's comment, November 10, 2013 6:59 PM
This is astonishing. The parents must have something mentally and psychologically wrong with them for not only killing their daughter, but for then to call the police explaining to them that it was actually her who did it. They obviously did not care for their own kin when they had thrown her in a trash can and they had obviously burned her with something. This is an extreme type of abuse. On another note, maybe she did drink something that killed her and the parents tried to hide it all by trying to get rid of her body, but once they figured out that it wasn't that easy, they just gave up and threw her in the trash can. Things like this make me absolutely sick.
Joshua Matheny's comment, November 13, 2013 5:12 PM
This small article raises some very important questions, how had the girl's body burned? Why are the parents smiling in the thumbnail picture? How come the child was not rushed to a hospital if they had ingested some form of chemicals. I think we do not know all the facts of the case either and it will be interesting when things are brought forward.
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No laughing matter

No laughing matter | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Staying in touch with the family IN THE early 1900s Mississippi’s prisons allowed private female visitors—but only for African-American convicts. This was in the...
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Ashley Bartolowits's comment, November 4, 2013 11:13 PM
This is very fascinating. The research about recidivism rates would be interesting to read. This issue also begs the question of what prison is for, punishment, rehabilitation or some mix of the two. Canada's use of conjugal visits is particularly interesting as the US has many similarities with Canada. I wonder what states in the US do allow the visits. Also, isn't is sad how much political concerns dictate scientific research? Often the most interesting and pressing questions aren't even investigated because no one is willing fund controversial topics.
Robert Tanner's comment, November 7, 2013 12:50 AM
I think our prison system is too soft. Too many comforts are afforded them at taxpayers’ expense. The cost is higher than many Americans make in a year. However, this does seem to be working in other parts of the world. We have been doing the same thing for so long in order to rehabilitate inmates without success, it is time we try a different approach. I would like to know is this something done across the board for all inmates or just for the non-violent ones. We have to take the culture into account when looking at other countries as models. For example, in many Arab countries, women are “lesser beings” so are sending them in for the pleasure of men would not be a big deal there, but much more so in places like the US.
Kelly Logue's comment, November 10, 2013 7:21 PM
I think that even though the canadian prison system does have its downfalls like them only having up to 25 years in prison instead of life sentences. But I do agree with the idea of a 72 hour window every 2 months where the inmates are allowed to be given a chance to show their families that they are still there for them and to their kids that they are still their fathers. I do agree that visits decrease anger in the inmates and reduces the crime rates within the prison system. Although America's prison system is tough and for the most part effective, I think we should consider this kind of intimacy, especially for inmates with families.