Criminology and E...
Follow
6.9K views | +0 today
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

School Hopes Talking It Out Keeps Kids From Dropping Out : NPR

School Hopes Talking It Out Keeps Kids From Dropping Out  : NPR | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The "conflict-resolution room" at Ypsilanti High School in Michigan is where students go when they're on the verge of being suspended. It's an alternative approach to discipline that could keep kids in school and out of trouble.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

U.S. military court overturns Marine's conviction in Iraqi's death

U.S. military court overturns Marine's conviction in Iraqi's death | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The highest U.S.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Prince Jackson testifies in wrongful death suit | Bangkok Post: multimedia

Prince Jackson testifies in wrongful death suit | Bangkok Post: multimedia | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Video clips, photo galleries and interactive graphics from Thailand and Asean.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Former Patriots Tight End Is Charged With Murder

Former Patriots Tight End Is Charged With Murder | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The N.F.L. player Aaron Hernandez was charged on Wednesday with the murder of Odin Lloyd, a 27-year-old semipro football player who was found dead on June 17.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Texas executes 500th prisoner

Texas executes 500th prisoner | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The US state of Texas executes the 500th prisoner since it reinstated the death penalty in 1982, as a woman is given a lethal injection for murder.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Same-sex married couples eligible for more than 1,000 federal benefits after DOMA decision - The Boston Globe

Same-sex married couples eligible for more than 1,000 federal benefits after DOMA decision - The Boston Globe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court’s ruling that the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional paves the way for married gay couples to receive more than a 1,000a thousand federal benefits and protections their straight counterparts already have access tocan...
Rob Duke's insight:

Until 2003's Lawrence v. Texas, states had the freedom to criminalize sodomy which essentially criminalized gay relationships.  Today the U.S. Supreme Court invalidated California's Constitutional Amendment that defined marriage as only between a man and a woman, thus making LGBT marriage legal.  This is an interesting study in how something that had few, if any, victims moved in a very short time from being criminal behavior to becoming a legal behavior.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Fairbanks man gets 11 years for killing woman

Fairbanks man gets 11 years for killing woman | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Fairbanks man was sentenced this afternoon to serve an 11-year sentence for fatally punching his girlfriend last summer at a Fairbanks homeless camp.
more...
Seth Dinkel's comment, June 23, 2013 5:52 PM
The way the ADA and judge handled this case is appalling to say the least. When one individual beats another to the point they suffer brain damage and die, it is evidence enough to get a conviction of first degree murder. Pre-existing medical conditions are no excuse for mitigating circumstances in the sentencing of this case. That is like pushing a man in a wheel chair in front of a car and saying if he had legs he would have been fine, I should get a lesser sentence. The actions of the ADA should be severely questioned. This case shows how little the Alaskan court system has developed in dealing with cross racial issues. Had this not been a Native Alaskan homeless woman the general public would be appalled by the actions of the ADA. Keep in mind that the man confessed to beating the woman to death.
Robert Boutang's comment, June 23, 2013 9:43 PM
This case is an outrage the way it was handled. If the victim was not a homeless person I bet the DA would’ve handled a lot different. The police even got a confession out of the murder. There’s enough evidence to get a lot better conviction. This is a insult to the victim’s family.
Danya Schimmack's comment, June 24, 2013 9:43 PM
This is definitely not how the case should have gone. The fact that this man capable of such violence and has a criminal past can be back on the streets in less than 11 years. I believe the plea bargain can be used too quickly which leads to a lack of true justice. This case is especially sad because the victim's family was left out of the loop and wasn't aware of the happenings.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

18 Unfortunate Mugshot Shirts

18 Unfortunate Mugshot Shirts | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The next time you get arrested, consider your choice of t-shirt.
Rob Duke's insight:

And now, for something completely different,....

more...
Sabrina Clemenson's comment, June 18, 2013 12:32 AM
This is highly entertaining, I had a good laugh at these photos. I agree with the previous comments saying that what you wear is going to influence how others judge you. I think the "how to outrun a cop" shirt in particular could offend a law enforcement agent and make them specifically look for a reason to arrest you. If you don't want extra attention from police officers, then don't wear a shirt that makes fun of police officers...
Keith Swift's comment, June 20, 2013 7:24 PM
I really liked this... It's a nice change from all the doom and gloom stories. I also agree that what you wear will contribute to how you are judged in the public's eye.
Mel C's curator insight, June 23, 2013 1:38 PM

I thought that this was funny and interesting. Thinking about an old police saying, “we only catch the dumb ones,” is only too fitting for these mug shots. This kind of makes you wonder about judging a book by its cover as the old saying goes, because clearly these special individuals should have been. No but seriously, people should be able to wear whatever they like and not be judged for it, however, when you do something like getting arrested wearing one of the previewed shirts, you are only asking for a hard time.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Santa Monica shootings leave multiple victims, gunman killed

Santa Monica shootings leave multiple victims, gunman killed | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police say five people, including the gunman, are dead in a shooting rampage
more...
Keith Swift's comment, June 13, 2013 8:34 PM
This was a seriously tragic situation... I am not going to condone what the gunman did or say he didn't get what he deserved but I wish that he would've lived so that he could be studied. I really think and feel that if more "snapped people" would be studied there might be a way that the information might help the public. I personally think that people who are disturbed need help. I wish that more people could notice the signs of a disturbed person before it was too late. Then the public would be safe.
Brittany Schilling's comment, June 17, 2013 4:05 AM
I have noticed that more and more shootings that happen end up with the shooter dead. I theorize that the shooter goes on this ‘mission’ with every intention that it will be the last thing they do. This is very dangerous as we can see by the four dead victims. My main question is what caused this. Was it a personal matter or environmental influence, or perhaps it was strain from economic or social problems?
Rachael Gray's comment, June 18, 2013 5:25 PM
Random acts of violence always seem the worse in my eyes. I just don’t understand what makes someone wake up and say “lets go kill lots of innocent people today” for no reason. Then again, maybe he did have a reason for such a horrible act. I couldn’t imagine just sitting there minding my own business and studying then all of a sudden being a possible victim when I did nothing wrong. It makes you wonder if we are doing something wrong in our society that this is the sort of violence that people turn to. Do they really want to kill people or are they looking to be killed so that they don’t have to commit suicide. It seems as if these school shooters have no goal or target but to kill many. I think more studies need to be done to understand what is causing these people to do such acts. It also makes you wonder if we need to allow are people to be armed. The outcome could have been much different if a student was carrying a weapon. Maybe more people would be alive. Sadly, it isn’t just the people who died that were affected. The witnesses to such events will live with that forever.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Next Seven States To Legalize Pot | Politics News | Rolling Stone

The Next Seven States To Legalize Pot | Politics News | Rolling Stone | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Why Oregon, California and more are likely to follow Colorado and Washington toward legalization
more...
Alysha Childs's comment, June 10, 2013 1:21 AM
I really don't appreciate that they call Alaska a "pothead paradise". It didn't surprise me that we were on the list at all though.
Keith Swift's comment, June 13, 2013 8:19 PM
I am all for the legalization of marijuana... I personally don't use it or like it, but the fact that it is illegal is bullsh!t. I have found no evidence that it is more harmful than alcohol. It holds many medical applications and yet the federal government still refuses to acknowledge this. The government even went as far as saying that marijuana is worst than heroin in the text book for my intro to justice class... Like I said I don't like the stuff, but I also believe that it shouldn't be illegal.
Sabrina Clemenson's comment, June 18, 2013 12:21 AM
I agree with you Keith that we should legalize marijuana. I don't think prohibiting it is very effective in deterring people from using it. I think prohibition just makes criminals out of small time recreational users. Many people use the "gateway drug" theory to oppose legalization of marijuana. Although it is true that most abusers of hard drugs started by experimenting with alcohol and marijuana, only a small percentage of people who experiment with marijuana go on to use hard drugs. I also would like to see marijuana legalized so that there will be less restriction on researching its psychological effects and health implications. I also found it surprising in the article that in Alaska it is legal to have up to 24 plants in your home! I had no idea that that was legal here. I don't use marijuana myself, but I don't think that we should make criminals out of those who do.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Someone Cut the Locks Leading to Boston’s Public Water Supply | Video | TheBlaze.com

Someone Cut the Locks Leading to Boston’s Public Water Supply | Video | TheBlaze.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The padlocks to hatches of an aqueduct outside of Boston that supplies drinking water to the metropolitan area were found cut Monday, leading to local concerns after there was a trespassing incident last month as well.
more...
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, June 16, 2013 6:42 AM
1. Couple points:
- First of all, I think it is interesting that people have very easy access to the gates and locks of water supply.
- Second, why there is no cameras? Or at least some kind of alarm system.
- Terrorism? Yes, now it is going to be a very hot topic on everything. I agree we need to be careful and watch out for it, but I think it is a bit crazy that whatever will happen on the streets people panic and blame it on terrorism right away.
Mel C's curator insight, June 22, 2013 5:18 AM

This is interesting to me because it doesn’t make any sense why someone would do that other than to freak people out. I totally understand why some might jump on the terrorist train given all the recent unprovoked violence these days, but I would imagine that if the terrorist wanted to harm us in that way, they wouldn’t leave such obvious clues.  

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Justice Dept. Reports Rise in Prosecutions on Indian Lands

Justice Dept. Reports Rise in Prosecutions on Indian Lands | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Justice Department said its rate of criminal prosecutions in Indian country had risen by more than 50 percent in the past four years, a period in which violent crime soared.
more...
Mel C's curator insight, June 2, 2013 5:18 PM

This is a touchy one. On one side of the fence, you have to have sufficient evidenced to try a person in court or youre violating their rights. At the same time, people are getting away with murder and rape and assaults which is wrong. What ever happened to bring this double increase in prosecuting serious criminal cases needs to continue. 

 

I think that trust was the biggest part in why so many cases when untouched. It's no secrete that Native Americans don't trust western society, with good reason too. Perhaps they tried to handle their own crimes at first and when they failed, they asked for help, but it was too late. Perhaps they now alert the western authorities a little sooner when major crimes are committed. 

Michael Eddington's comment, June 9, 2013 8:25 PM
I think a majority of times it also boils down to not wanting to offend their culture and not having a firm grasp on cultural norms and or ignorance.
Robert Boutang's comment, June 23, 2013 11:42 PM
I wonder who is investigating these crimes. In Alaska we have only one Indian recognized Indian reservation. The Metlakatla reservation located on Annette Island . Metlakatla has their own Police Department and they ask for assistance on all major crimes. The federal government is supposed to investigate these major crimes which occur on the reservation. Because of the remoteness and distance, the Alaska State Troopers usually do the investigations and they do a very good job. I wonder if the law enforcement on the reservations is asking for outside help and as a result they are getting more convictions.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

You never call, you ignore meetings ... read al-Qaeda's letter to terrorist

You never call, you ignore meetings ... read al-Qaeda's letter to terrorist | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
AFTER years of trying to discipline him, the leaders of al-Qaeda's North African branch sent one final letter to their most difficult employee.
Rob Duke's insight:

It's interesting that Al Qaeda seems to have the same management problems as any other organization...

more...
Maximillian Anderson's comment, June 1, 2013 12:10 PM
This article was very interesting. I never thought about terrorist oranizations having problems with "employees". I've always thought of terrorists as blind followers on the path to Allah. I guess there are always going to be unruly employees who don't follow orders, don't perform well, and ultimately try to take an organization down.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Are criminal background checks racist?

Are criminal background checks racist? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The EEOC is suing 2 U.S. companies for racial discrimination. Why? Because they ran criminal background checks before hiring workers. (EEOC using the civil rights act as legal basis for suing companies that "discriminate" against criminals.
more...
Robert Boutang's comment, June 27, 2013 2:59 PM
The federal government conducts background investigations for every federal agency including the FBI, CIA, homeland security, U.S. Customs, Postal Service, ATF, USAID, DOD and every other federal agency. The Federal government has different levels of background investigations. These levels are: secret, top secret, the lowest level is called the Lac which is a law check. And if there are issues which come up in a law check, the issues have to be resolved by the investigator before they’re sent to the adjudicator. The background investigation is based on the whole person concept. One mistake you made your life cannot disqualify you from passing your background investigation. The adjudicator takes everything aspect in your life and makes a decision upon your background. Every member of a military is involved in classified information undergoes a security clearance background investigation. The federal government pays as much is $8000 or more on each investigation depending on location and were all the references are located . Each one of us has our own background. We have to take responsibility for the things we have done our life good and bad. The reason we have the background investigations is because we don’t not want someone in our federal government was not suitable for position of trust and responsibility. A corporation or company has their reputation and integrity to protect and keep potential threats out of their business. A criminal history background is part of each background investigation. The subject of investigation has a police check done at every town he lived in, schools and universities he’s attended, every employment he has been employed at. Every military base he’s been stationed at and also to references or more is required to be interviewed at each employment, military base, neighborhoods he lived in. Criminal background law enforcement checks are the most economical, easiest means to get an idea about potential problems of their potential employee.
Robert Boutang's comment, June 27, 2013 3:09 PM
Edward Snowden's escape from the long arm of the law has turned into a globetrotting flight for asylum that took the security leaker from Hong Kong to Moscow with a final destination in South America.

Snowden made his getaway from China to Russia on Sunday morning with the help of WikiLeaks legal advisers who facilitated a dialogue with Ecuador’s Foreign Ministry, the secrets-spilling organization announced.

“The American whistleblower who exposed evidence of a global surveillance regime conducted by U.S. and U.K. intelligence agencies has left Hong Kong legally,” WikiLeaks wrote on its site. “He is bound for the Republic of Ecuador via a safe route for the purposes of asylum.”


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/world-eric-snowden-article-1.1380553#ixzz2XRezZepr
Robert Boutang's comment, June 27, 2013 3:15 PM
Edward Snowden's is an example of a person who went through an extensive background investigation and still people can slip through the cracks.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Zimmerman trial witness: Screams for help sounded like a boy

Zimmerman trial witness: Screams for help sounded like a boy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Judge Alex Ferrer weighs in
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Pride and Prejudice: An Interactive Timeline of the Fight for Gay Rights

Pride and Prejudice: An Interactive Timeline of the Fight for Gay Rights | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
From the first gay rights organization to the battle for marriage equality, TIME looks at the history of the gay rights movement.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Supreme Court Kills the 'Gay Marriage Is Bad for Kids' Argument

The Supreme Court Kills the 'Gay Marriage Is Bad for Kids' Argument | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The majority opinion in United States v. Windsor said that denying gay couples the right to marry is harmful to children.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Michigan man recognizes mom as bank robbery suspect, turns her in

Michigan man recognizes mom as bank robbery suspect, turns her in | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The FBI says a man recognized his mother in surveillance photos of a bank robbery and called police to turn her in.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Phoenix serial killer dies in prison

Phoenix serial killer dies in prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A serial killer convicted of murdering six people in a shooting spree that terrorized Phoenix in 2005 and 2006 was found dead Wednesday in his death row prison cell, officials said.
more...
Robert Boutang's comment, June 23, 2013 11:03 PM
Dale needed help a long time ago. Too bad it was recognized and maybe all these lives could have been saved including his own. What if he would have been found incompetent? I feel sorry for the victims’ families. I believe the death penalty is justified for taking the life of an innocent individual.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, June 24, 2013 1:49 AM
First of all, if he never admitted that the crimes were his fault then why did he want to die??? Also, i am kinda glad that his brother, Randy, said was on the side of justice, and not on his brother's side. i think Hausner was mentally ok, and everything was fine with him psychologically. I got a feeling that someone was holding him alive for a reason, i mean he wanted to die, he even asked about it in the letter, yet he was alive for 7 years. i think it is a good thing that there is one criminal less in this world.
Danya Schimmack's comment, June 26, 2013 9:24 PM
It's tragic that in the end there was no true justice. This man made selfish choices taking other people's lives and did not have to fully face the consequences, he received his own punishment but still had control. While I am for the death penalty, the system needs to be reformed to where the execution takes place sooner so the consequence of their choices can be more closely tied their actions, and so cases like this can receive justice for the victims families.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Criminal Justice News: Philadelphia Drug Kingpin Sentenced to Death, Co-defendant to Face Life in Prison

Criminal Justice News: Philadelphia Drug Kingpin Sentenced to Death, Co-defendant to Face Life in Prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
more...
Danya Schimmack's comment, June 15, 2013 6:55 PM
I can't imagine someone being willing to go to those extremes to protect their drug trading. I also find it extremely stupid for Savage to have directed the attack on Coleman; he would automatically become the main suspect in the bombing. I just shake my head at his arrogance that he believed he could get away with these crimes, or even if he didn't believe that, he still felt empowered that he had the right to take those lives. I also appreciate the attorney's comment thanking the investigators in the case as that is the base for him to create a case.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

California's 'Night Stalker' serial killer dead at 53

California's 'Night Stalker' serial killer dead at 53 | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Convicted serial killer Richard Ramirez, who earned the nickname Night Stalker for his mid-1980s reign of terror in the Los Angeles region, died on Friday at a hospital near the...
more...
Rachael Gray's comment, June 18, 2013 5:41 PM
I am never one to wish a person dead but I suppose the world is a safer place with him gone. To see that lack of remorse is sicken. The idea of what he did to these women is horrifying. It is so amazing how people can be like this. This is why I love the idea of criminology to understand these kinds of people. Though, I know that many violent attacks are from people you know it seems like to scariest violence is from a stranger. I am more afraid of the strangers around me then the people I am acquainted with. It could just be perception. I couldn’t imagine knowing that a bad guy is lose and that I have to not go out at night or put a gun under my pillow cause I could be next. They defiantly know how to instill a sense of fear and power of people.
Mel C's curator insight, June 23, 2013 1:56 PM

I think I will take a different able of this, yes it is good that this evil man who has caused so much death and destruction is dead, but why was it on his own terms? The only reason why the death penalty is present in today’s society is because it is supposed to be the ultimate deterrence factor that a justice system can have, but is it really? I think that it could be if it were used correctly. Our justice system takes so long that by the time the person actually receives their punishment, it has lost of all of the deterrence power it had. People change over time and an offender who is being punished today is not the same person they were when they committed the crime. I understand that the justice system needs to take every precaution to ensure the offender is in fact guilty and deserving of the punishment bestowed upon them, but there has to be something that gives. A balance between the time the crime was committed and the date the punishment will occur while keeping things accurate.

Seth Dinkel's comment, June 23, 2013 5:53 PM
In this case I believe it is important not to consider the death penalty just as a deterrent. In some cases an individual’s actions are so evil that they warrant death. When the Night Stalker serial killer murdered those innocent people, he sought to do harm to those within society. It is important that we remove this type of person from society permanently so that they can do no further harm. Even though the Night Stalker died of what appeared to be old age, the reassurance that he was on death row must have been immense to the family members of the victims. It is important to reassure society that individuals who commit heinous actions will be punished for their misdeeds.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Know Anyone Who Thinks Racial Profiling Is Exaggerated? Watch This, And Tell Me When Your Jaw Drops.

Know Anyone Who Thinks Racial Profiling Is Exaggerated? Watch This, And Tell Me When Your Jaw Drops. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This is one massive reality check, folks.
Rob Duke's insight:

Not exactly scientific, but....interesting.

more...
Sabrina Clemenson's comment, June 10, 2013 6:04 AM
This is a very good demonstration of racial and gender profiling. Videos like this are good for people to see so that they realize how much racial profiling really occurs and so that they can try to refrain from engaging in profiling themselves. I thought it was very funny at the end when men were stopping to offer their assistance to the girl stealing the bike.
Mel C's curator insight, June 22, 2013 5:07 AM

After watching this, I am said to say that it is not a surprise that this happened. Of course racial profiling is still in existence, but it is up to us to fight through it. It is my opinion that it is human nature to make judgments based on their beliefs, experiences, and their observations. The worse part about all of this is that there doesn’t seem like there is a whole lot people can do to change their thinking unless they actually know they think this way. Some people don’t even realize that they judge people by their race, but they do. It doesn’t make them racist, just human.

Alexander Yakovlev's comment, June 24, 2013 2:02 AM
I think this video is really upsetting. Not only it is racial profiling, which had been proved many times that people do judge by what your nationality, or look is. I was really surprised when a guy actually offered a girl to help her to steal a bike, probably just so she will like him or just to look cool. I, as a foreigner, getting the same reaction from people on the streets. I mean no, people don't think that i will steal something, but people do have a different attitude toward me, versus an american person. Just gave you a personal example.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Too High To Fail: Inside Denver's Weed Boom | Culture News | Rolling Stone

Too High To Fail: Inside Denver's Weed Boom | Culture News | Rolling Stone | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Welcome to the city where pot nerds are growing the new American economy
more...
Keith Swift's comment, June 13, 2013 8:27 PM
I can really get behind this "high" taxing. I think this should be considered in most states and even at the federal level as it might help with the current national debt. It will also help to get dealers off the street by changing the supply and demand. I take my hat off to the "Mile High City"
Brittany Schilling's comment, June 17, 2013 4:10 AM
I have always looked at drugs as an economic solution but a moral wrong. The real question is if certain or all drugs were legal would that really decrease crime or increase it. If more people have access to certain drugs, there is a chance that more crimes could be committed.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Marijuana Arrests Four Times as Likely for Blacks

Marijuana Arrests Four Times as Likely for Blacks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Black Americans were nearly four times as likely as whites to be arrested for marijuana possession in 2010, but both groups used the drug at similar rates, federal data shows.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why are feminists going topless?

Why are feminists going topless? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ITS activists have dressed as policemen and sex workers in Kiev; as marathon runners and Muslim men in London; and as nuns and maids in Paris. Femen, a Ukrainian...
more...
Seth Dinkel's comment, June 1, 2013 9:04 PM
In this story I find myself surprisingly agreeing with the Muslim feminist blogger Hind Makki who states that “it is regressive to make yourself look like a sex toy.” Personally I support the feminist movement for the development of equal rights. However, these women are doing little more than objectifying themselves in the eyes of the media. I do not believe the baring of skin is enhancing the feminist movement. Just look at the comment boards of The Economist news.
Shelina Turner's comment, June 3, 2013 1:47 AM
While I agree partially with what they are supporting, women should have the right to do what they want. Parading around without your shirt on probably isnt going to help much. Also have you thought about the women who are in the pornographic videos and prostitution? While some are being pressured or forced by "pimps" but some are very wealthy and successful in what they do. They should have the right to chose that line of work if thats what they feel is the best choice for them.
Sabrina Clemenson's comment, June 10, 2013 6:26 AM
I think that these feminist activists are having success in getting media coverage by going topless, but I think their bare chests are detracting from their message. The article says, "Alice Schwarzer, a leading German feminist, thinks that the protests work so long as the message gets more attention than the flesh." I only read the first couple comments on the Economist website, but all that I read were more about breasts and naked women than the message the feminists were trying to send.