Criminology and E...
Follow
Find
10.9K views | +8 today
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Texas sheriff allows Sikh officers to wear beards, turbans on patrol

Texas sheriff allows Sikh officers to wear beards, turbans on patrol | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Texas sheriff, in gesture to South Asian Sikh community, allows Sikh deputies to wear beards, turbans
Rob Duke's insight:

'Bout time.  Proud tradition in Indian military and policing.

more...
Chad Kaestle's comment, February 8, 7:58 PM
This is a good development for them. They have been trying to receive the authorization to wear beards on duty for some time. The only downside for them could be the potential safety concern of someone grabbing onto a large beard for control of the officer, much like a necktie could be used.
Rob Duke's comment, February 8, 10:34 PM
Yeah, good point. I wouldn't want to give someone the leverage, but they wrap their hair pretty tight, so maybe it's not an issue.
Kyle May's comment, February 10, 5:36 PM
It's nice to see more acceptance is being allowed with in US police forces. Sadly it is long overdue, and many restrictions hinder minorities from applying to the spot. I feel that more diversity on a squad the better, as it allows for many more outlooks on life and life experiences. I wonder what other restrictions will be removed for minorities in the near future.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

For alleged Russian hacker, a visit to Amsterdam is a costly trip

A Dutch court ruled that a Russian man accused of taking part in several high-profile hacking incidents can be extradited to the United States.
more...
Chad Kaestle's comment, February 8, 8:22 PM
Cyber criminal, but occasionally we can when they end up in a convenient location with extradition. In the US these crimes are tricky when it is not a network or cybercrime ring, but someone who steals a relatively small amount. Many agencies do not have the resources to go after all of them, but we are working on getting more training to officers to change that.
max mckernan's comment, February 9, 4:06 AM
Now the question is what will be the repercussions of this arrest? we have seen hackers do things in the past for revenge now do we just wait and see what happens? It is good that we were capable of catching this one but ultimantely we need more funding for our cyber crime divisions to help hunt more of these criminal down.
Kyle May's comment, February 10, 5:42 PM
I agree with Max, what repercussions will happen? When Sony sued the person who jailbroke their PlayStation, the community who sought for his freedom took their stand by shutting down the PS Live networks for almost a month. Now this was just for the PlayStation, now this guy helped mastermind one of the largest identity frauds to be prosecuted. If they were able to do this, what else can they do?
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A Chicago Community Puts Mixed-Income Housing To The Test

A Chicago Community Puts Mixed-Income Housing To The Test | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Chicago plans to replace its Lathrop Homes public housing project with a mix of condos and affordable housing. Residents say it doesn't need a revamp — and that the overhaul will displace too many.
more...
Megan Earle's comment, February 9, 9:35 PM
Mixed-income housing is something I wasn't previously familiar with. From a sociological standpoint this is very interesting to me in a way that I'm curious how the higher-income families view the neighborhood and if it really is just gentrification in disguise.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Georgia barber offers free ‘old man’ haircut as punishment for misbehaving kids

Georgia barber offers free ‘old man’ haircut as punishment for misbehaving kids | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Now parents aren’t the only ones who pull their hair out.
Rob Duke's insight:

LOL...the look on the kid's face before and after:

 

"This sh!t ain't funny man!"

more...
Destine Edgeworth's comment, February 8, 11:07 PM
That's a little bit harsh. When a child isn't given the choice on at least if they have hair or not then end up going to school and getting bullied and that is something that could permanently damage a childhood and there future. But if it works for a parent then do what you want.
Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 1:41 AM
I found this to be hysterical. Sure there may be studies to show that there is a possible negative correlation due to this, but public shaming is a valid strategy and especially to a child at this age, there is only room for improvement. Plus, hair is hair. It grows back. If the kid doesn't like it enough, he could shave the rest of his head.
Riley Landeis's comment, February 9, 2:42 AM
This is a great example of good old fashioned discipline. I completely agree, I used to get beat with a wooden spoon, this would have been much worse.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Publications NIJ Publication Detail

Publications NIJ Publication Detail | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:

Require a double check of print reads and it's unlikely that you'll have an error--even when biased conditions exist.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Throwaways - The New Yorker

The Throwaways - The New Yorker | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
On the evening of May 7, 2008, a twenty-three-year-old woman named Rachel Hoffman got into her silver Volvo sedan, put on calming jam-band music, and headed north to a public park in Tallahassee, Florida. A recent graduate of Florida State, she was dressed to blend into a crowd—bluejeans, green-and-white patterned T-shirt, black Reef flip-flops. On the passenger seat beside her was a handbag that contained thirteen thousand dollars in marked bills.
more...
Rodney Ebersole's comment, February 5, 5:38 PM
This is a sobering article to read about the problems in the system of using informants and the horrible mistakes that can happen along the way. Any system that holds no one accountable for their errors is a system that needs changing. I understand the need for informants and serious drug dealers should be used as possible informants. Young people with minor possession charges should not be considered the same though and put in the situations this article spoke of. All of these informants were originally doing something illegal, but I am really saddened by the lack of regards for these informant’s lives and how the police handled the situations. I hope there will be more regulations put in place in regards to informants and how they are handled. Overall, I still think informants have their place, but I'm not sure bullying them into it for minor charges is ethical.
Julius Matilainen's comment, February 6, 9:10 PM
The Confidential Informant system seems to have a lot of moral dilemmas. The risks for people who choose to participate in this kind of “helping” of the police are high. I can only ask that how is it possible to in worst-case scenario gamble a persons life on such grounds. No training and if I understood correctly only under on police officers discretion. The rights of a suspect who agrees to co-operate in this kind of system should at least cover that he or she understands correctly on what she or he is agreeing. And that it may cost to be fatal.

In Finland that kind of police protocol would need to be strictly regulated.

“The cops, they get federal funding by the number of arrests they make—to get the money, you need the numbers,” This allegation makes the case even worse. Like one could argue that police are sacrificing peoples lives in order to keep their jobs. That sounds like a quite corrupt system doesn’t it? Even though I hardly believe this is the whole story and I am sure it is not so black and white as the article alleges. But still some kind of regulatory action federally might be in order?
Heather Wiinikka's comment, February 9, 1:50 PM
I do not think the police should be sending out people as informants with very little legal knowledge and very little protection, I feel the police did not protect her enough because this should not have happened and i also think the police that were involved in this action should be held responsible.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Tasers and Drones: Abuse of power in law, justice, and national security
Scoop.it!

New Meds Block Heroin Craving, But Reporter Finds Treatment Centers Don't Use Them

New Meds Block Heroin Craving, But Reporter Finds Treatment Centers Don't Use Them | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Huffington Post's Jason Cherkis investigated the heroin epidemic in Kentucky, and found that the abstinence-based approach used in most treatment centers was leading to many fatal relapses.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, February 5, 7:51 PM

Well, it sounds like the drug only satisfies the cravings for narcotics such as heroin because suboxone is a type of opioid, which is otherwise known as a narcotic.  Taking this drug will temporarily sate your cravings for narcotics and helps with withdrawals.  I found this article to be a bit misleading because it makes it sound like this drug Suboxone to be a wonder drug to cure people of narcotic addiction.  I just don’t really know how I feel about this article, other than it to be misleading.

Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Juneau defines 'public places' where pot use will be banned

Juneau defines 'public places' where pot use will be banned | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Under the Juneau ordinance, public places will include streets, sidewalks, trails, parking lots, schools, businesses, parks and "the common areas of public or private buildings and facilities."
Rob Duke's insight:

Going to need an initiative to spell out that when the voters approved cannabis, they didn't mean that their representatives could "pencil out" all reasonable areas for use.  Either way, I don't see cops being keen on writing someone a ticket for going out on a motel balcony to smoke....

more...
max mckernan's comment, February 5, 5:57 PM
I think that it will be hard to enforce all of the different areas where cannabis can be smoked, because of the amount of people in the state. The use of the cannabis seems that it will only be limited to where people live.
Julius Matilainen's comment, February 7, 9:58 PM
I agree with you guys. It would be easier for everyone of the food-chain if the state forwardly admitted that there will be a areas for the use of the product. They wouldn't even have to define what or where these areas are until the 9 month period. Just let the public know that it is coming. And if they really want to limit the use for peoples homes only, then clearly state that. This kind of information just leaves people with more questions. They should at least define the “public place” in the regulation if it differs from the ordinance.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Tasers and Drones: Abuse of power in law, justice, and national security
Scoop.it!

9 Revolting Videos of Cops Abusing People (Just From Last Month)

9 Revolting Videos of Cops Abusing People (Just From Last Month) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Cops are killing, pepper spraying and tasing, even on camera.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Rob Duke's insight:

There's a couple that are revolting, but the rest are debatable (one is older than a month).

 

1. Cops should be able to detain and folks should be required to comply with safety related orders;

2. Cops should be able to maintain public order;

3. Cops should be able to reasonably investigate crimes without resistance or interference by ANYONE; and,

4. Suicide by cop is a tragedy.

 

Having said that:

1. Cops gotta be professional;

2. Cops can't be scared by normal people doing normal things;

3. Cops gotta maintain their cool;

4. When your co-worker is redlining, you gotta say/do something; and

5. Gotta discipline (and fire) cops that can't be professional.

 

That is all.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Video: 'Black Widow' killer Julie McGinley released from prison - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

Video: 'Black Widow' killer Julie McGinley released from prison - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Friends of a murdered man have expressed their shock and distress after a killer labelled the 'Black Widow' was released early from jail. Mother-of-two Julie McGinley (43) was freed fro
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The paradox of the ghetto

The paradox of the ghetto | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE poorest people in Leicester by a wide margin are the Somalis who live in the St Matthews housing estate. Refugees from civil war, who often passed through Sweden...
Rob Duke's insight:

Yeah, true for most of the country, but in California there's been a weird exception (Prop. 98) that means funding comes from the state and is mostly equal throughout the state dependent on a particular school's daily census (pupils attending that day).  Despite this, California's schools are still unequal.

Maybe it's more than tax structure that holds kids back in America....?

more...
Julius Matilainen's comment, February 7, 9:42 PM
It truly is hard to say which kind of class sizes and other conditions in the school make it work the best. I´d approach the question on the community's perspective. If the teachers, parents and kids are share quite similar values and they care about their community in my (not so broad) experience, kids are usually more successful in their studies, just simply because they care. They care for each other and their parents even for the teachers. So i consider it important that teachers are local, or that they share some kind of connection to the community.

But again its never that simple. It is a very complicated issue that has many different variables. Its impossible to predict the successful formula. And even if you thought you'd find one, it will never apply on everywhere.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from European Union - Justice and Home Affaires
Scoop.it!

French Police Detain 8 People in Anti-Terrorism Raids in Paris, Lyon - Wall Street Journal

French Police Detain 8 People in Anti-Terrorism Raids in Paris, Lyon - Wall Street Journal | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

French police detained eight people in antiterrorism raids in Paris and Lyon as part of a crackdown on radical Islamist recruiting groups, said the Interior Ministry.


Via Marc Van den Broeck
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

#BlackGirlsMatter: When Girls of Color Are Policed Out of School

#BlackGirlsMatter: When Girls of Color Are Policed Out of School | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
more...
Destine Edgeworth's comment, February 8, 11:23 PM
That is crazy that the school did that. In my school it was not like that, but it was also no school like schools in the lower forty eight.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

Punishment Mechanisms and Their Effect on Cooperation: A Simulation Study

Punishment Mechanisms and Their Effect on Cooperation: A Simulation Study | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

In social dilemmas punishment costs resources, not just from the one who is punished but often also from the punisher and society. Reciprocity on the other side is known to lead to cooperation without the costs of punishment. The questions at hand are whether punishment brings advantages besides its costs, and how its negative side-effects can be reduced to a minimum in an environment populated by agents adopting a form of reciprocity. Various punishment mechanisms have been studied in the economic literature such as unrestricted punishment, legitimate punishment, cooperative punishment, and the hired gun mechanism. In this study all these mechanisms are implemented in a simulation where agents can share resources and may decide to punish other agents when the other agents do not share. Through evolutionary learning agents adapt their sharing/punishing policy. When the availability of resources was restricted, punishment mechanisms in general performed better than no-punishment, although unrestricted punishment was performing worse. When resource availability was high, performance was better in no-punishment conditions with indirect reciprocity. Unrestricted punishment was always the worst performing mechanism. Summarized, this paper shows that, in certain environments, some punishment mechanisms can improve the efficiency of cooperation even if the cooperating system is already based on indirect reciprocity.

 

 


Via Bernard Ryefield, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

An ex-cop’s connections

An ex-cop’s connections | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Leader of the boys in Blued MA BAOLI had served in the police force of the coastal city of Qinhuangdao for 16 years when, in 2012, his superiors delivered an...
more...
Shelly DeWilde's comment, February 6, 9:18 PM
That idea sounds so innovative and very revolutionary and I am already curious and expectant to see how the case ends. It is a shame that the system let this obviously smart and tolerant man go for something that I would regard as discrimination, it is a loss for the police force.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Inside the world's deadliest biker gangs

Inside the world's deadliest biker gangs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Every second for five years he risked discovery and certain death - being beaten until he was nearly dead, a bullet to his head and his body dumped in the desert. Charles Falco lived undercover ins...
more...
Shelly DeWilde's comment, February 6, 9:29 PM
This person did a real service. I'm also sure his intel offered the police force ways in order to expel biker gang crime all over the world. It's very brave and true of him to want to continue with this crazy, possibly suicidal, endeavor for the community and locals to feel safe.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Tales from the crypt

Tales from the crypt | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
TIME is up for the Dread Pirate Roberts. Ross Ulbricht, the 30-year-old Texan physics graduate accused of setting up the first major drugs marketplace on the web,...
more...
Rodney Ebersole's comment, February 5, 4:34 PM
I had not heard of this sort of internet crime before but honestly figured stuff like this was already in place. There seems to be all kinds of crimes able to be done on the internet, the secrecy possible makes criminals that are technically savvy able to have free reign with criminal acts. The US Government and police agencies look like they got a couple lucky breaks and did a good job of discovering who was behind this drug trafficking website. I would imagine our society and police forces will be looking for more and more technically savvy individuals who can help fight crimes like these.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why Do Tribes Have Matrilineal Societies?

Why Do Tribes Have Matrilineal Societies? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Sonny Skyhawk addresses the tradition of matrilineal governance of Native American societies
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

Study on sexual behavior discovers why some people ‘stay’ while others ‘stray’

Study on sexual behavior discovers why some people ‘stay’ while others ‘stray’ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Scientists said Wednesday they had amassed the first evidence to back theories that people fall into two broad categories — promiscuity or faithfulness — when it comes to sex.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Hope Allen's comment, February 5, 10:13 PM
Its very interesting that something from the personality can be indicated from something like the length of a finger.
Orion Hutchin's comment, February 6, 10:24 PM
I think the finger length is ridiculous as an indicator. The testosterone I think would have to be a huge player in ones sexual desires. Hormones in both men and women can have a lot of impacts. I am not sure I am willing to accept that exposure to higher amounts of testosterone in the womb can really be expected to explaining people staying or straying. I think a better thought would be if a person has higher testosterone levels maybe they just need a lot of sex. If the relationship isn't satisfying that need, than we see straying. However if it the relationship is satisfying that need we then see a higher chance of staying!!
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Evolution of a Criminal | Independent Lens

Evolution of a Criminal | Independent Lens | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A filmmaker returns to his Texas hometown to explore what led him to rob a bank as a 16-year-old and how it affected those around him.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

Angry White Buddhists and the Dalai Lama: Appropriation and Politics in the Globalization of Tibetan Buddhism

Angry White Buddhists and the Dalai Lama: Appropriation and Politics in the Globalization of Tibetan Buddhism | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
[Savage Minds is pleased to publish this essay by Ben Joffe. Ben is a PhD candidate at the University of Colorado. He holds a MA from the University of Capetown, and a Wenner-Gren Foundation for An...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from feimineachas
Scoop.it!

Handy chart for deciding if you are, or are not, a "slut" (#endslutshaming)

Handy chart for deciding if you are, or are not, a "slut" (#endslutshaming) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Handy chart of deciding if you are, or are not, a "slut". Here's a handy guide for figuring out if you're a "slut". It could be put to use also by people who habitually think of others as "sluts" (tip: just convert the first person to third person to move through the chart). Here are some of...


Via feimineach
more...
Rodney Ebersole's comment, February 5, 1:20 AM
This was an excellent chart to hit home how a word like "slut" shouldn't be used and should be removed from modern society. Unfortunately, there are a bunch of disrespectful and derogatory terms such as this that are used to belittle woman frequently. No one should be called a slut and I'm glad to see there are organizations addressing this. I have two daughters and I would be very angry and upset if someone used that term for one of them. People don't think about what they say and kids use words like this as if it isn't hurting anyone. Parents need to teach their kids that those terms shouldn’t be used.
Rob Duke's comment, February 5, 2:33 AM
I agree. Men "own" their sexuality and no one cares much whether their judgement is the best. In matrilineal cultures, there are no words for sexual promiscuity and the concept of bastard doesn't exist. This is because women own land and land needs hands to work it. The true value of a child is known and there's no "rent-seeking" incentive to capture a woman's value by shaming her.
Orion Hutchin's comment, February 6, 10:31 PM
This chart had me tricked at first. I thought they were going to lead to a yes or no answer to being a slut. However I do agree with both previous posts about it is disrespectful towards women. Men are totally treated differently, in fact we are praised if we have wild, frequent sexual interactions. I read all the possible questions on the chart. I have even done some of those and I am a dude. The bottom line is sexuality is just a part of human nature. Some more than others, but by no means does that make someone a slut. The belief of someone being a slut is a learned behavior depending on how a person was raised to think, feel, and understand sex I think at least.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

S&P to pay $1.4 billion for role in the financial crisis

While not admitting wrongdoing, Standard & Poor’s Financial Services agreed to pay almost $1.4 billion to settle allegations by the Justice Department that credit ratings for high-risk mortgage securities mislead investors before the 2008 financial crisis. Judy Woodruff discusses implications of the penalty with Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood and Lynn Stout of Cornell University. Continue reading →
more...
No comment yet.