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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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20 Charged in 'Sexting' Scandal in Two New Jersey Schools

20 Charged in 'Sexting' Scandal in Two New Jersey Schools | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An unnamed adult and 19 juveniles allegedly exchanged nude and partially nude photos of female students.
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William Estrin's comment, May 31, 2015 3:00 PM
The first thing I thought of when I started reading this article even before they mentioned it was the DC sniper back in the day. I know they said that there have been incidents of shattered windshields, but I’m curious as to what else leads law enforcement to believe that the two shootings are related. Either way, I sincerely hope they catch the person or persons behind these shootings before they can do anymore damage. My thoughts go out to the people in Colorado. The best advice I can say is to just be very aware of your surroundings and to take precautions if anything seems to be amiss, such as a car that seems to be following you. What baffles me is the motive behind these shootings. It doesn’t seem like the person gains any reward from random shooting like that except maybe sick excitement.
Eric Lee's comment, June 1, 2015 2:08 AM
It makes no sense to bring criminal charges of invasion of privacy to anyone in this case. SHE posed for the pictures, SHE was the initial distributor of the pictures, SHE was the one that gave up her reasonable expectation of privacy. If you don't want things to come back and haunt you, don't leave any traces of stupidity behind. It's really simple as that. I have hardly any sympathy for people that do inappropriate things like that and expect to be treated as the "victim". On that note, the invasion of privacy charges don't seem right. As long as the people naked in photographs are consenting adults, regardless of who saw it after the initial receiver of the pictures, the government needs to stay out of it. Judging by the absence of child pornography charges, I'm going to assume that she was of age in the pictures. Posting naked picture to others is hardly a behavior of someone that cares about their own privacy. I'm not saying what the 20 alleged offenders did was right, but there shouldn't be a legal battle over this. I hope that they're found not guilty of the ridiculous charges.
Brittney Menzel's comment, June 1, 2015 5:13 PM
So, where did these males originally receive the photos? Were they originally sent by a 'friend' a girlfriend? I'm a little on the other side here. I am in a fully committed relationship and I would certainly never send a picture to my husband-to-be. It's just not something I would do. These girls took the picture/had it taken and sent it out or somehow gave access to it to someone. Technology today is not something to mess around with. If you don't want it out there, don't do it. Pretty simple. I am not excusing these young men for what they have done... I'm just saying that I don't feel all the blame belongs to them in my opinion.
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Colorado Hunting for Shooter Who Killed Cyclist, Injured Driver in Two Attacks

Colorado Hunting for Shooter Who Killed Cyclist, Injured Driver in Two Attacks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police said evidence connects the fatal shooting of a cyclist who was riding on a rural road and the shooting of a woman driving on Interstate 25.
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Brittney Menzel's comment, June 1, 2015 5:05 PM
It would seem that there is much more to this story than is told in the very brief article shared here. I wish they would say what the evidence that links the two cases together is. I hope justice is found soon for the victims and that something is done before there are more victims. Also, let's hope it is not another beginning for some serial killer who has decided to target random innocent people. Very scary world we live in...
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Unsettling settlements

Unsettling settlements | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE scene was familiar: regulators meting out vast penalties to banks, scathing statements about gross misconduct, yet no individuals charged with any crimes and...
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The Cryptocurrency-Based Projects That Would Pay Everyone Just for Being Alive | VICE | United States

The Cryptocurrency-Based Projects That Would Pay Everyone Just for Being Alive | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Although there's a 0 percent chance of the US Congress enacting universal basic income, techies have launched their own DIY basic income schemes through the distribution of online currencies like Bitcoin.
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Texas May Finally Get an Exoneration Commission. Now if the CCA Would Just Exonerate Innocent People

Texas May Finally Get an Exoneration Commission. Now if the CCA Would Just Exonerate Innocent People | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rep. Ruth Jones McClendon's persistence seems to have finally paid off this session. In addition to finally getting her long-stalled needle-exchange bill through the House, the San Antonio Democrat appears to have finally won another hard-fought legislative battle. For more than a decade McClendon has filed a bill to create...

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City Puts Brakes on Bus Ads That Tell Public About Inequality

City Puts Brakes on Bus Ads That Tell Public About Inequality | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Officials deemed an advertisement about unequal access to parks too ‘political.’
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In Ohio pepper-spray assault case, victim gets to fire back

In Ohio pepper-spray assault case, victim gets to fire back | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Associated Press PAINESVILLE, Ohio — An assault suspect who pepper-sprayed someone in the face at a fast-food restaurant received similar treatment in court as punishment from a
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SeaBoundRhino's comment, May 31, 2015 6:41 PM
The options this judge gave were interesting. It is as if some people don't truly understand what empathy is and therefore they do whatever they please. I think one problem with our crime rates is that people just don't think before they act. It's as if people forgot what they heard growing up their entire life, "If you don't want it to happen to you, then why do you do it in the first place?"
Peter Krieger's comment, May 31, 2015 8:52 PM
I found this article and situation in Ohio to be very interesting. It is not a new approach to many, but one that is rarely ever used in the courts. This "eye for an eye" mentality. For me personally I kind of like the idea, and as stated in the video 90% of the people had not returned. Obviously its an interesting and unique was for sentencing or punishing people for their crimes, but one that seems to have worked in this situation.
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The cost of being nice

The cost of being nice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
RYANAIR'S recent attempts not to “unnecessarily piss people off”, as Michael O’Leary, the airline’s boss, famously described its new business strategy,...
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Nichole Bathe's comment, May 31, 2015 4:03 PM
This was a sort of funny article, it seems as though the airline tried to do some research about what costumers want and in the end came up with a slightly weird compromise. I fly a lot and now that they have gone to assigning seats instead of a free for all makes me want to fly there airline more. I think tho that because they are trying to make everyone happy they have to up ticket fees its just how it works. Overall its kind of a interesting article that makes you wonder how airlines can really make passengers happier without increasing ticket prices.
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The start of the rebellion?

The start of the rebellion? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THORSTEIN VEBLEN, an economist who dabbled in sociology, reckoned that the best-off members of a community established the standards that everyone else followed....
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Employee Misconduct | When good people do bad things

Employee Misconduct | When good people do bad things | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

 By Peter J. Henning

 

At the sentencing hearing for Kareem Serageldin, a former senior executive at Credit Suisse, Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein of the Federal District Court in Manhattan pointedly asked why someone in such a position would engage in misconduct. As DealBook reported, the judge asked, “Why do so many good people do bad things?”

That is the conundrum of many white-collar crime cases: successful business people act in ways that put careers and personal fortunes at risk for seemingly modest gains, and sometimes the misconduct benefits their company but themselves only indirectly.

Mr. Serageldin was the global head of the structured credit group at Credit Suisse, responsible for overseeing its subprime mortgage securities portfolio. He was indicted in February 2012 for inflating the value of bonds held by the bank to cover up losses as the collapse in the housing market hit in late 2007.

As seen in other recent cases, there were recorded telephone conversations in which Mr. Serageldin and other defendants discussed keeping the prices high to protect their positions in the hope that the housing market would turn around. When internal inquiries into the valuations were made, the defendants did their best to cover up what they had done, a losing battle that led the bank to disclose the mismarking in February 2008.

Judge Hellerstein imposed a 30-month prison term, a punishment below the recommended sentence for the violation. In explaining the reason for the reduction, the judge noted that Mr. Serageldin’s conduct “was a small piece of an overall evil climate inside that bank and many other banks.” Credit Suisse disagreed with that characterization, noting that regulators had highlighted the isolated nature of the wrongdoing.

Of course, even if the judge was correct, a corporate culture that puts pressure on employees to cut corners to make their targets is not an excuse for criminal conduct. Was this a case in which the moral compass simply went awry when a person was put in a stressful situation?

If the misconduct is just an aberration, then that may support the proposition that crimes by these types of individuals really cannot be deterred because they have convinced themselves that the conduct is not “really” wrong, or at least they will be able to make things right at the end of the next quarter. If you do not believe you are doing anything illegal, then there is no fear of punishment.

Perhaps misconduct by some groups can be ascribed to the belief that so long as everyone else seems to be doing something, it cannot actually be wrong. Continuing investigations into global banks’ manipulation of the London interbank offered rate, or Libor, as well as foreign currency exchange rates are replete with examples of traders exchanging information and boasting of their ability to artificially raise or lower a benchmark rate. These are not isolated instances, but part of a pattern of conduct over months and even years. So it cannot be chalked up to the heat of the moment.

What is so puzzling about people who have led otherwise good lives is that they are unlikely to have engaged in the misconduct if it is presented to them in stark terms. Ask a Wall Street trader, for example, whether he or she would trade on material nonpublic information received from a corporate insider, and the answer from most would be “no” — at least if there was a reasonable chance of being caught.

But under pressure to produce profits for a hedge fund or a bank, traders are often on the lookout for an “edge” on the market that can slowly take them closer to crossing the line into illegality. Add to that the vagueness of the insider trading laws in determining when information is “material,” and it can be easy to cross into illegality without necessarily noticing it.

The current trial of Michael S. Steinberg, a former senior portfolio manager at SAC Capital Advisors, puts the firm’s culture on display and raises the question about how far traders are willing to go for that edge on information. A former SAC analyst, Jon Horvath, is expected to testify about how he obtained inside information and passed it along to Mr. Steinberg, claiming they both knew it had been improperly obtained. But in the fast-paced environment of securities trading, do those buying and selling pause to ask whether they have come close to the line, or maybe even crossed it?

Perhaps the most inexplicable insider trading case involves Rajat K. Gupta, formerly head of global consulting firm McKinsey & Company and a former director of Goldman Sachs who was convicted of tipping Raj Rajaratnam, the founder of the Galleon Group hedge fund, about impending developments at Goldman. He is appealing the conviction, and a separate order in a civil enforcement action brought by the Securities and Exchange Commission permanently barring him from serving as a director or officer of a public company.

Mr. Gupta did not make any money from his actions, and before sentencing, his lawyers argued that the conduct represented an “utter aberration.” In imposing a two-year prison sentence, Judge Jed S. Rakoff of the Federal District Court in Manhattan said he had “never encountered a defendant whose prior history suggests such an extraordinary devotion, not only to humanity writ large, but also to individual human beings in their times of need.”

When looking at Mr. Gupta’s case, Judge Hellerstein’s question about why such a good person would do bad things looks to be unanswerable.

That does not mean that good people should avoid punishment just because they have lead otherwise exemplary lives. But it does raise questions about how much punishment is appropriate for someone who has lost so much, and about how to ensure that people do not cave in to the pressure to engage in misconduct.

As Judge Hellerstein pointed out in sentencing Mr. Serageldin, “Each person has to look within himself and ask himself what is right, what is wrong.” White-collar crime cases too often involve defendants who never seem to have asked such questions.

Peter J. Henning, a professor at Wayne State University Law School, is the author of “The Prosecution and Defense of Public Corruption: The Law & Legal Strategies.” Twitter: @peterjhenning


Via Vilma Bonilla, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Marei Benton's comment, May 31, 2015 12:44 AM
I think of white collar crime as being the red-headed stepchild of the crime family... 1) It is often impossible to understand without an MBA, and 2) in all honesty, it presents as being fairly dull. (Ex: Ask yourself how many forensic TV shows you're ever seen that featured a white collar crime as their main plot focus)... That being said, according to our textbook, white collar crime is usually not as "popular" as serial killers or celebrity stalking... No offense, but after reading this article, I can see why that is.
Rob Duke's comment, May 31, 2015 5:15 AM
You make good points, particularly about having an MBA. Is it any wonder that cops don't pursue the types of crimes for which they are not prepared to investigate. I had been a cop for 13 years before I got an MPA and had the minimal tools to understand the basics of White Collar Crime.
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BP says oil spill bill over $2 billion would be "severe"

BP says oil spill bill over $2 billion would be "severe" | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Any fine above $2 billion against BP for the Deepwater Horizon disaster would be “extraordinary and severe,” double the highest-ever U.S. water-pollution fine and potentially crippling its American oil business, BP said in court documents.


Via SustainOurEarth
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They bring in $214B a year of which the report a little over $17B as profit.  Is $2B too much?  Over time, it won't even scratch the surface of the cost to the economy and infrastructure of the gulf....

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SustainOurEarth's curator insight, April 29, 2015 4:01 AM

The courts fine the poor extraordinary and severe fines everyday. It would be quite extraordinary to see a corporation "person" treated equally for a change. Our corporate citizens don't seem to think they should be penalized for damage done, heaven forbid anyone go to jail. Jail is for the poor.

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California’s Drought Is So Bad, Thieves Are Now Stealing Water

California’s Drought Is So Bad, Thieves Are Now Stealing Water | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Forget gold or cash, credit cards or gas. The new hot commodity to steal in parched California is H20.
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The mass incarceration of black men | Abagond

The mass incarceration of black men | Abagond | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

"Michelle Alexander, a civil rights lawyer and law professor at Ohio State University, argues in “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” (2010) that the mass imprisonment of black men since the 1980s has taken the place of Jim Crow as American society’s main way to control black men -  just as Jim Crow itself took the place of making them slaves.

...

While blacks and whites sell and possess drugs at about the same rate, guess who is filling up the prisons under these drug laws? Mostly black and Latino men, particularly those from poor neighbourhoods. In some states as many as 80 to 90% of those found guilty of a drug crime are black men. But the Supreme Court sees no racism in that."

 

- MORE -

 


Via Community Village Sites, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Martin Luther’s pro-sex shocker: “Does the pope set up laws? Let him set them up for himself and keep hands off my liberty”

Martin Luther’s pro-sex shocker: “Does the pope set up laws? Let him set them up for himself and keep hands off my liberty” | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Adultery, impotence, fornication, masturbation: Centuries ago, Martin Luther's ideas were way ahead of their time
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New prisoner re-entry center in the works for Mat-Su

New prisoner re-entry center in the works for Mat-Su | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Mat-Su, home to Alaska's largest prison, may also house a new prisoner re-entry center aimed at lowering the state's high recidivism rate. 
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Vincent Zamora's comment, June 2, 2015 2:54 AM
This is such a refreshing article and a huge sign that society has not giving up on people who have made bad decisions. Its even better knowing that it is right here in my state. there is not a lot of places like this in the world and it is a great base point for those have a hard time adjusting to outside life after you have completely being institutionalized. Its extremely difficult for those who do not know, it can be compared very much like to PTSD with soldiers at war. its not easy going right back to living a normal life and it takes a lot of support and help from the community to change your life again the way you want it to be.
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A Choice for Recovering Addicts: Relapse or Homelessness

A Choice for Recovering Addicts: Relapse or Homelessness | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Virtually unnoticed and effectively unregulated, a system of housing known as “three-quarter” homes profits off the poor and desperate in New York City.
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William Estrin's comment, May 31, 2015 3:12 PM
This is extremely disheartening to me. Addiction is an extremely serious disease that takes immense dedication and perseverance to overcome. To come all that way and get clean and completely turn your life around is remarkable. And then to threaten to put a person to the streets unless they go back to what ruined their life and they fought so hard to overcome is absolutely reprehensible. Reading this story reminds me of a story right here in my town of Jacksonville, Florida making national news right now. There was a pediatric dentist in Jacksonville that had been giving children painful, unnecessary dental procedures because he gets paid a fee from Medicaid every time he did a procedure. He was the only pediatric dentist in Jacksonville who accepted Medicaid, so he was able to prey upon the poor, who had no other options. He made nearly $4 million from performing unnecessary dental procedures in children. There are horror pictures of young children with literally no teeth in their mouth because of what he did. Not only was he in it for the money, he was also a sadist, whom enjoyed inflicting pain on young children. He has since then given up his dental license and is now facing numerous lawsuits. The things people will do for money is scary and sickening.
Nichole Bathe's comment, May 31, 2015 3:52 PM
This was a shocking article to read. I had no idea that these types of places existed let alone that these people existed. I feel as though its such a horrible thing to do to these people who have worked very hard to start to recover from something very hard like addiction. This really makes me wonder why we know about this as a society and we know that people are taking advantage of recovering addicts but still we do nothing. We give these people money to find housing knowing that the amount we give them is not going to be enough for them to live anywhere but these three quarter homes. I don't know how you can stop this from happening if we don't completely change the outpatient services for recovering addicts. It really is hard because like the title of this article they either do this and have a place to live or live homeless.
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Street Outlaws Participant Charged with Murder. Mustang Driver Found and Charged. Pretrial set for June 11, 2015

Street Outlaws Participant Charged with Murder. Mustang Driver Found and Charged. Pretrial set for June 11, 2015 | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Street Outlaws Participant Charged with Murder. Mustang Driver Found and Charged. Pretrial set for June 11, 2015
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Silk Road successors

Silk Road successors | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Closing down the web’s biggest drug shop has simply cleared the way for competitorsROSS ULBRICHT, better known by his online pseudonym, “Dread Pirate Roberts”,...
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And we should expect it to keep growing....

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William Estrin's comment, May 31, 2015 3:22 PM
I read about this story on the news and I am glad to hear he is spending the rest of his life in prison. I know he pleaded to get out when he was old, but he doesn’t deserve it in my opinion. He knowingly and willingly ran a criminal enterprise, knowing full well the risks and consequences if he was caught. He made his bed and now he has to sleep in it. He sold people illegal and dangerous substances that ruined countless people’s lives in order to make exuberant profits. I fully support the war on drugs. I don’t think we’ve necessarily gone about it in the most practical and cost-effective ways but I support the principle of zero tolerance for illegal drugs in the US. They are dangerous and cause people to act in a way that threatens themselves and society and thus should remain illegal and anyone caught in possession, sale, or use of any of these illegal drugs should be given extremely hefty penalties. I only hope this serves as an example for other people who are thinking of getting in the business of selling drugs and makes them think twice. I suppose this goes along the lines of the classical theory of criminology in that if the punishments are harsh enough, people won’t commit the crimes.
Eric Lee's comment, June 1, 2015 1:48 AM
The drug war is a failing effort on part of the government to control the content of one's blood. The federal government is losing a war against plants and chemicals for people to use of their own accord. That being said, it's only a matter of time until a competitor steps in to meet the demands of the market. Silk Road was there to meet that demand for consumers that were willing to voluntarily take part in any and all transactions. The sales and consumption of drugs in and of itself is a victimless crime. Everyone owns their body and they have the absolute right to control what happens to their body. The founder and the owner of the website did nothing other than provide a service to consenting adults on the activities they want to get involved in voluntarily. It's too bad that's this guy isn't a banker, he would have walked away without even hiring a lawyer. Sad to see another casualty of the failing war on drugs waged by police unions, the privatized prison complex and big pharmaceutical companies. I'm just waiting for the government to rest the CEO of Budweiser at this point.
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Hostgator Dotcom, the Man Covered in Porn URLs, Is Getting His Face Back Thanks to VICE Readers | VICE | United States

Hostgator Dotcom, the Man Covered in Porn URLs, Is Getting His Face Back Thanks to VICE Readers | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Our recent profile of him led to the man formerly known as Billy Gibby getting $3,200 in donations, which he's using to remove his facial tattoos.
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Ross Ulbricht, Creator of Silk Road Website, Is Sentenced to Life in Prison

Ross Ulbricht, Creator of Silk Road Website, Is Sentenced to Life in Prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mr. Ulbricht was sentenced to life in prison for his role as what prosecutors described as “the kingpin of a worldwide digital drug-trafficking enterprise.”
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Marei Benton's comment, May 31, 2015 12:18 AM
I was actually reading about this case this morning even before logging on to this website... Personally, I think that the arguments made by the mother of the dead young man are pretty lame. She states that her son would still be alive if Ulbricht's website hadn't existed... Ummmmmm, no, lady. Your son would still be alive if he hadn't done heroin... I am of the belief that addicts will always find their drugs, regardless of whether it's online or in person.
Rob Duke's comment, May 31, 2015 5:21 AM
Yeah, I agree, but law has moved this way for a couple decades. For instance, in corporate liability law if you get burned up while smoking in bed, the mattress company is going to be held liable. This is strange because the mattress companies offer some level of warning (mattress tags) and even educate people about the dangers of smoking in bed. In addition, one thing about mattresses and bedding is that you get either soft/snugly/comfortable or you get hard, rough, and flame retardant. Frankly, folks don't buy those flame retardant materials for their bedding. You might ask then: "why do the courts find mattress companies liable?" Simply based upon the idea that you could forsee the problem, you can quantify the likelihood of the event, therefore you can insure for the problem. If a company can insure, then they should and that provides a social welfare net for the Darwin Award winners that smoke in bed leaving "innocent" dependents behind (hopefully not consumed in same said fire).
Marei Benton's comment, May 31, 2015 5:22 PM
Prof. Duke - Fair enough argument in return. I would say, however, that I don't agree with any of these silly, superfluous lawsuits... Yes, it may be a fact of life nowadays, but every time I read about lawsuits involving mattress fires or hot coffee, I just want to pound my head on the nearest table.
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Exploring the 'Nazi Village' of Jamel | VICE | United States

Exploring the 'Nazi Village' of Jamel | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The town may have only housed around 35 permanent residents, but it skewed pretty heavily toward neo-Nazis and extremists who are mostly members of the far-right NPD political party.
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These Stunning Photos of New Zealand's Largest Gang Will Give You Sleepless Nights | VICE | United States

These Stunning Photos of New Zealand's Largest Gang Will Give You Sleepless Nights | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the 1960s, a gang of variously disaffected youth sprang up in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. They didn't ride bikes, but they quickly developed all the trimmings of an outlaw motorcycle club: patches, club colors, and a fiercely violent process of initiation. They came to be known as the Mighty Mongrel Mob and today they're the largest gang in the country, with around 30 chapters across both islands.

Media access to the Mob is rare, which is why this photo series by Jono Rotman is kind of a big deal. Jono, who is a Wellington born photographer now living in NYC, cut his teeth capturing New Zealand's prisons and psychiatric wards, before he took on gang life in 2007. We asked him how he convinced hardened gang members to sit for large format photography, and what he learned along the way.
Rob Duke's insight:

The first place I went to was in Porirua to photograph Denimz, the guy with the dogs on his cheeks. That's a largely Pacific Islander and Maori area with a lot of state housing. Denimz's place is nice though, he's got a good family and he's a well-organized guy. I think as they get older their outlook gets wider: it's less about turf war, and more about the health of their community. When we met I tried to speak as directly as I could.


<I had the same experience dealing with the Bulldogs in Fresno.  If you take the time to learn their world view, it has definite undertones of protecting the community.  The turf war is just to keep outsiders from preying on the community.>


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The Great Divide, Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University - YouTube

Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them
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Is empathy overrated? — Yes! Empathy is a minor player with a distinctly "Dark Side".

Is empathy overrated? — Yes! Empathy is a minor player with a distinctly "Dark Side". | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

OK, to start with "empathy" (The ability to understand and share the feelings of another), is not "sympathy", (feelings of pity for the misfortune of another), with which it is often conflated... 


So, in conclusion, while empathy is one of Stephen Pinkers “Better Angels of our Nature”, it is a minor player, with a distinctly dark side, whose role has been misunderstood due to an erroneous belief that through mirror neurones we can share another’s experience. In truth, empathy’s darker side, can be instrumental in committing atrocities, and even when benign is akin to sentimentality: weak, prejudicial and limited in range. 


by Jim Vaughan 


Via Edwin Rutsch
Rob Duke's insight:

For more on this process, see Manfred Kets d'Vries work on Folie a deux.  This is the ability for charismatic leaders to somehow get followers to share in their lunacy (see Hitler, Jim Jones Cult, Charles Manson Family, etc.).

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Will Putting Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Behind Bars Accomplish Anything?

Will Putting Silk Road Founder Ross Ulbricht Behind Bars Accomplish Anything? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Tomorrow Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht will be sentenced.  He faces the possibility of between 20 years to life behind bars because drugs were bought and sold on his website.  The prosecution is painting him as a major drug dealer and blaming him for the deaths of six people who overdosed (without acknowledging that our current drug policies lead to 35,000 accidental overdose deaths per year).
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