Criminology and Economic Theory
20.1K views | +0 today
Follow
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Amid weed wars, stoned-driving laws still half-baked

Amid weed wars, stoned-driving laws still half-baked | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There’s no marijuana equivalent to the famed blood-alcohol content tests — taken by breath, blood or urine — that have planted .08 into the American consciousness. [...] with no definitive measurement for intoxication, arrests are often challenged, with officers relying on evidence like indecisiveness behind the wheel or a pungent car interior. The lack of clear parameters for driving while stoned is one reason many police agencies and political leaders have opposed the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, known as Proposition 64. Advocates for marijuana legalization and some experts following the issue, however, see the focus on doped driving as a distraction, questioning whether authorizing pot use would affect the roadways of a state that already has a ripe medical cannabis industry. Some recent studies have called into question purported connections highlighted by legalization opponents between marijuana use and car accidents. A report last year by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration stated the agency “did not find an increase in population-based crash risk associated with THC use.” Andrea Roth, an assistant law professor at UC Berkeley and an expert on pot legalization, called claims by elected officials, law enforcement groups and the National Institute on Drug Abuse that pot has contributed to a rise in accidents “scientifically irresponsible.” [...] Proposition 215, the 1996 law that approved medical marijuana, made it legal for people with a doctor’s permission to have some THC in their system. Prop. 64 would legalize the use and possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for anyone 21 or older and allow adults to grow as many as six plants for personal use — though using pot in public would remain illegal. Colorado dealt with the problem by changing the language in their marijuana bill, stating that 5 nanograms in the blood is a “permissible inference” of impairment combined with other factors, like bloodshot eyes and the presence of pot smoke, bags of weed and paraphernalia in the car. “The state still has to prove that you were impaired ... so an accused person can show a doctor’s recommendation for so much per day and argue that they can function at that level,” said Sam Kamin, a constitutional and criminal law professor at the University of Denver who is on the state’s recreational marijuana implementation task force. The Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, an organization set up to track the impact of legalization in Colorado, said marijuana-related traffic deaths jumped 32 percent from 2013 to 2014. Many police departments have also been hiring experts who can identify symptoms of drug intoxication in motorists. The handheld electronic devices, deployed in pilot programs in Southern California and other areas, test for the presence of marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines and pain medications in saliva. A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration study last year found that motorists with a blood-alcohol level of at least .08 were nearly 400 percent more likely to get in an accident than their sober cohorts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Indonesia approves Castration for sex offenders

Indonesia approves Castration for sex offenders | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Indonesia, Rape laws, Punishment for rapists, Chemical castration, Human rights, Crime against women
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

When it comes to affordability, the West Coast is your worst bet

When it comes to affordability, the West Coast is your worst bet | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Bloomberg Housing Affordability Index reveals six U.S. metro areas where the minimum salary needed to buy a home exceeds the median household income.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How zero-tolerance policing pits poor people against poor people

How zero-tolerance policing pits poor people against poor people | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I spent roughly two and a half years alongside Jackson, Larry, and 14 other street vendors as they conducted business along Fifth Street, one of Skid Row's main thoroughfares. These men devoted their time on the block to far more than simply hawking their wares. Tidying the sidewalk, quelling arguments, and, most notably, intercepting alcohol and drug consumption, the men maintained a vigilant system of informal social control.

Since the 1990s, American cities have embraced aggressive zero-tolerance policing policies. Police officers fan out across the country’s poorest minority neighborhoods to detain and search pedestrians, and to issue citations and make arrests for things as trivial as jaywalking, blocking the sidewalk, and loitering. An overlooked effect of these policies: Residents often feel pressured to step outside of their routine activities to regulate the actions of their fellow citizens before the police arrive on the scene and make matters worse. In Skid Row this "third-party policing" now extends all the way down, so to speak, forcing even onlookers and pedestrians to become accountable for the behaviors of others.
Rob Duke's insight:
So, how would you change policing?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Chief ID's Officers Shot in Southcrest

Chief ID's Officers Shot in Southcrest | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
About three hours into the standoff, officials outfitted themselves with masks and began running hoses to the house, getting ready to dispense tear gas.
At 12:20 p.m., it appeared SWAT officers were making entry into the home. NBC 7 crews could hear glass shattering at the scene as officers entered the house from a back door.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Jobs - Job Details - Emergency Dispatcher

Jobs - Job Details - Emergency Dispatcher | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Provide Emergency Communication Services. Responsible for initializing appropriate response to emergency situations for campus as well as Fairbanks community. Information is obtained via telephone, interpersonal and/or radio system. Responsible for determining appropriate response level and department(s), to include fire, ems and police. Works closely with all other departments in North Star and Denali Borough and assure mutual aid agreements are fulfilled with most efficient and effective resolution of emergency situation to assure limited loss of life and/or property. Utilizes priority response system as well as pre-arrival instructions for providing emergency assistance to victims prior to arrival of emergency personnel. Assures University''s interests in limiting liability and fulfillment of expectations of community. Monitor and utilize multiple radio frequencies to ensure efficient and effective radio communications among emergency response personnel. Receive, identify and properly process emergency requests for medical, fire and/or police assistance. Maintain constant contact with all involved parties to ensure best possible outcome to the situation. Assure safety of police officers by providing them with all pertinent information and monitoring location and welfare at all times.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Philippines President Makes Good on Pledge to Mass Murder People Who Use or Sell Drugs, Calls for "No Mercy" in State of the Nation Address | Drug Policy Alliance

Philippines President Makes Good on Pledge to Mass Murder People Who Use or Sell Drugs, Calls for "No Mercy" in State of the Nation Address | Drug Policy Alliance | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:
Felipe Calderon did this when he was elected President of Mexico in 2006.  I had just visited the West Coast all the way down to Acapulco and it was safe and pleasant.  Today, I wouldn't trust going there.  In 10 years, drug policy has turned the country into a drug cartel occupied country.  My guess is that the Philippines will have a similar result.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Are Men Inherently More Criminal Than Women?

Are Men Inherently More Criminal Than Women? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How much money would it take to get you to steal a piece of candy? $10? $50? $200? How about to steal a car? Or how about this—how much would it take for you to kill someone? Is there any amount of money that would justify taking someone’s life?

Turns out your answer to these questions may vary widely depending on one factor: Your gender. A new survey found that men are much more willing to commit crimes—and for much lower sums of money—than women.

This information was taken from a survey fielded by Get Safe, a company specializing in home security, which asked 2,000 Americans (53% male and 47% female) a series of hypothetical questions using Survey Monkey to gauge how far they’d be willing to stretch their moral compass—and just how much money it would cost to get them to do it. The results were unsettling.

The survey found that 80% of respondents would steal a piece of candy for money. Not too bad—it’s just candy, right? Well, 71.8% said they’d be willing to punch someone in the face for money, which feels a bit more unsettling. More than 55% of respondents said they would steal a car for cash, and scariest of all, 40.6% said they would be willing to kill someone if the pay was high enough. Whaaa? Granted, most respondents said it would take millions of dollars to add murder to their resume—but the point is that there appears to be a line, and many Americans say they’re willing to cross it.
more...
Kevin Lawson's comment, July 24, 2016 7:37 PM
It’s reassuring that both the number of willing participants and the price for committing a crime scaled directly with the severity. This is great evidence for deterrence theory as there is a much greater risk associated with stealing a car or murder as opposed to vandalism. One thing to consider is that some of the statistics for comparison in this article are based on reported crime. While this is the only certain data, and the reason why it’s included in the Uniform Crime Report, we must consider unreported crimes as well. A survey of unreported crimes may be helpful for further analysis. I remember reading in a similar gender examination article recently about the numbers of women psychopaths vs male psychopaths. The message is that women are just as likely to manifest psychopathic tendencies, but in different ways than men. So, while the examples in this survey list crimes that men are more likely to commit, I wonder if there are other crimes that could be surveyed that women would be more likely to commit.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Making It Easier for Former Inmates to Work in L.A.

Making It Easier for Former Inmates to Work in L.A. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The city plans to prohibit some employers from asking job applicants about their criminal record.
more...
Kim Gomez's comment, July 24, 2016 3:45 PM
I foresee this going either way, very bad or very good. It certainly increases the risk on the employers end because they may be hiring someone with multiple theft convictions and putting their financial well being in jeopardy, but then again it may very well be giving these offenders a chance at redemption. Some offenders truly do want to live their life after being released and have zero intention of re-offending and this gives them ample opportunity to contribute to society. It will be interesting to see which way this will go.
Lydia Weiss's comment, July 24, 2016 4:52 PM
I can see this being both really good and really bad. It can be bad if the convict was caught for assault, or theft, something that can either affect the company or coworkers. However, let's focus on the good. It can be extremely difficult for people to be re-integrated into society for a variety of reasons post incarceration, one of which is that not many places will hire an ex-convict. This can give them more opportunities to better themselves.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Expensive Cigarettes No Longer Keep Teenagers From Smoking

Expensive Cigarettes No Longer Keep Teenagers From Smoking | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Fewer American teens smoke cigarettes today than 20 years ago. And taxes on cigarettes are much higher, too. For a while, these two trends were related, because…
Rob Duke's insight:
Exactly as Nobel Laureate Economist, Gary Becker, predicted.  Whenever you criminalize something, it activates a whole host of incentives to sneak, but there's also a social benefit for adolescents to be "bad" within their own subculture.  While the taxation portion of this policy isn't unwise, it's a false dichotomy to say that it's alright to tax the heck out of cigarettes for adults, but we must prohibit kids from smoking because they'll make bad choices--this is literally like putting a candy dish at the end of a tight rope--if someone really wants the candy, the tight rope won't stop them.  There's no reason we can't treat teens and adults the same on cigs--existing "sin" taxes with public information (but without the criminalization that makes cigs so attractive).
more...
Lydia Weiss's comment, July 24, 2016 4:58 PM
The way the title was worded made me initially think that more and more teenagers were smoking, possibly because they had the money due to jobs. Thankfully, the article proved me wrong, stating that they smoke less than they used to, it's just the die hards who still smoke regardless of the taxes.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

High water mark: active marijuana ingredient found in U.S. town well

High water mark: active marijuana ingredient found in U.S. town well | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Residents of a small farming community in eastern Colorado have been warned to avoid drinking the town’s water after THC, the psychoactive agent in marijuana, was found in one of its feeder wells, authorities said on Thursday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Classmates gather at Hutchison to grieve teens killed in crash

Classmates gather at Hutchison to grieve teens killed in crash | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — A large crowd of teens ignored a steady rain Wednesday night when they circled a giant boulder on the front lawn of Hutchison High School.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Too much information

Too much information | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Based on a long-standing correspondence with Gerald Foos, the self-declared “World’s Greatest Voyeur”, Mr Talese tells the story of his subject’s life as owner of Manor House Motel in Colorado for nearly 30 years. Mr Foos fitted his property with an “observation platform” in the attic, complete with fake ventilator grates, enabling him to spy on his guests (often accompanied by his wife) undetected for around three decades. His interest was both sexual and “scientific”: Mr Foos would take meticulous notes as he observed the sex lives of couples in the rooms beneath him, from the suburban mother stealing lusty trysts with a doctor in his lunch hour, to the married couple and the young stud employed in their vacuum-cleaner company, to the Miss America candidate from Oakland who spent two weeks in the motel and never had sex with her husband. Mr Foos would often then masturbate, or have sex with his wife.

“The Voyeur’s Motel” is a strange composite. It has, in effect, two authors with distinct agendas. Mr Talese is interested in voyeurism and its moral implications. Mr Foos, who first confided in Mr Talese in 1980 and over three decades later gave the writer permission to go public with his story, believes himself to be a “pioneering sex researcher”. He explicitly places his journal and statistical records in the tradition of William Masters and Virginia Johnson, themselves pioneering sexologists. Mr Foos considers himself to have performed three decades of public service, and now seeks recognition.

Shortly before publication, the Washington Post found that Mr Foos had not owned the motel for the whole period he claimed to have had access to it. Mr Talese seemed to disavow the book, then to disavow his disavowal (probably under pressure from his publishers). If the primary value of “The Voyeur’s Motel” lies in its veracity, or, as Mr Foos might like, as a sexual history of post-war America, this flip-flopping might render it worthless. In fact, it adds a layer of intrigue. The problem for the reader, though, is that this is an exercise in exhibitionism as much as a study of voyeurism. Even if Mr Foos’s tale is broadly reliable, it is unsettling that he has been given a platform.
Rob Duke's insight:
You can't make this stuff up....
more...
Lydia Weiss's comment, July 19, 2016 11:28 PM
While I can somewhat see this from a scientific point of view and how he might not want his "research" "spoiled" by people knowing they were being watched, HE DID NOT HAVE THEIR CONSENT! The lack of consent makes this completely not okay, and while I'm sure he made some... interesting... research, I can't see why he'd want to be known for being one hell of a peeping tom for thirty years. Jeex.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Parent effort aims to end violence with 'culture of respect'

Parent effort aims to end violence with 'culture of respect' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Hundreds of L.A.-area parents are trying to help families tackle gun violence by focusing on reducing domestic violence and school bullying.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

An Oregon teen is facing federal drug charges over a single gram of marijuana

An Oregon teen is facing federal drug charges over a single gram of marijuana | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
He is heading to college — or a year in prison.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

This sociologist spent five years on LA's hyper-policed skid row. Here's what he learned.

This sociologist spent five years on LA's hyper-policed skid row. Here's what he learned. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When I step out of my house, I think about what I might be teaching that day or what I'm going to have for dinner. In Skid Row most of the residents' cognitive energy is directed to two things: "How do I stay off the cops' radar, and how do I stay safe—how do I avoid becoming a victim today?" Essentially, what people have to think about all the time is, "How do I prove to police that I'm not a bad person? How can I be sure I don't look like an addict?" (Don't pick at your clothes, don't pick at your skin, don't scratch your head.) It's an incredible amount for a person to take in. It makes it really hard to concentrate on everyday things—like being a good employee if you do have a job, or pulling off a job interview.
Rob Duke's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Large DNA study using 23andMe data finds 15 sites linked to depression

Large DNA study using 23andMe data finds 15 sites linked to depression | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Depression is one of the most common mental health conditions and one that is estimated to cost the world billions in health-care costs and lost productivity.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

VIDEO: 1 officer fatally shot, another wounded, SDPD chief says

VIDEO: 1 officer fatally shot, another wounded, SDPD chief says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A San Diego Police officer was killed and another wounded late Thursday after they came under fire in the Southcrest neighborhood.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Harassment charge reinstated for threat on Anchorage Assemblyman Traini's Facebook page

Harassment charge reinstated for threat on Anchorage Assemblyman Traini's Facebook page | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A dismissed harassment charge against a 23-year-old man accused of threatening Anchorage Assemblyman Dick Traini on Facebook in 2013 was reinstated last week by the Alaska Court of Appeals in a case highlighting the balance between freedom of speech on social media and a public figure's right to feel safe.

The opinion from Chief Judge David Mannheimer ruled that Shane Kidd Borowski's Facebook post was not automatically protected by the First Amendment, reversing a district court ruling. Mannheimer also wrote that the government didn't have to prove that Borowski actually intended to carry out the threat he was accused of making in the post.

The post, which in texting English said, "your going to be assassinated," appeared under the name "Shane Bro Ski" on Traini's re-election Facebook page in 2013.

Traini called police, and Borowski, then 20, was arrested on a charge of terroristic threatening. Borowski told authorities he was only joking and didn't mean to do any harm.
Rob Duke's insight:
Did his "speech" constitute a clear and present danger?  See Schenck v. U.S. (1919).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Criminal history and background checks: A look at how criminal records can affect access to jobs, housing, higher education

Criminal history and background checks: A look at how criminal records can affect access to jobs, housing, higher education | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
2015 study in Criminology that looks at the evolution of the availability of criminal records and how having a criminal record affects a person's ability to secure work, housing and higher education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

What Are Victim-Impact Statements For?

What Are Victim-Impact Statements For? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Twenty-five years after the Supreme Court ruled in their favor, what exactly have victims of crime won? And at what cost?
more...
Kevin Lawson's comment, July 24, 2016 8:54 PM
I lean more towards the argument of using victim impact statements for healing and closure. The platform of a court room gives the speaker a stage where the audience are people that matter in hearing their opinion. It’s one thing to speak with a therapist, but speaking to a judge carries much more weight. However, as mentioned, victim impact statements communicate and, ideally, transmit emotion and empathy to the jury. A speaker wants justice for their lost family member. Inciting anger or sorrow helps the speaker’s cause. I wouldn’t say that this is a bad thing. In a court proceeding, jurors may experience those emotions in hearing the proceedings and viewing the evidence. An impact statement simply personifies it.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

A sports fan–friendly timeline of Russia’s Olympic doping scandal

A sports fan–friendly timeline of Russia’s Olympic doping scandal | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Russia's state-run system of cheating was exposed in the past year by a trio of whistleblowers.
more...
Bryce Schwarz's comment, July 24, 2016 4:32 AM
I'd like to believe I am an avid sports fan although admittedly I truly only follow baseball closely. This is the first I have read any sort of timeline related to Russia's doping scandal and it is quite shocking. Not only were they able to cover the majority of it up for as long as they did but after it was uncovered those close to it began to die unexpectedly... Very strange. It would be interesting to see if these deaths were looked into closely or merely put on the back burner.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

In surprise, GOP looks to revive Depression-era banking law

In surprise, GOP looks to revive Depression-era banking law | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — The Republican Party has taken a page straight out of the campaign books of Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. What? No, we're not kidding. In
Rob Duke's insight:
This is a HUGE development in terms of White Collar Crime and the Great Recession of 2007.  The big banks were all complicit in driving up risky investments because of the fees and interest they were able to charge.  

Not only did this cause the meltdown, but it hurt the economy in that we didn't invest in the "brick" economy, because we were too busy investing in risky subprime mortgages--Why manufacture anything when you can make 10X the profit in banking?  This hit as a double whammy during the depression: 1. people lost pensions and many lost homes when the real estate market crashed (try selling a home when you need to because you lost your job); 2. people lost jobs and there was too little opportunity to re-train or just simply take a factory job--these didn't exist in great numbers.

After the economy meltdown, many predicted that reinstating the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 would be a no brainer, but banks have successfully lobbied against it, which has again put our economy at risk.  Since virtually no one went to jail for the fraud that caused the economic melt down that destroyed millions of pensions and other investments of "normal" people, the banks have naturally snuck back into the same routine that led to the breakdown.  The most problematic behaviors (e.g. packaging subprime mortgages into funds, or synthetics, that the rating agencies gave AAA ratings, but were really worthless because the underlying mortgages were trash or because the fund was leveraged too many times with complicated repackaging, swaps, etc.).

This should have been Job-#1 after the collapse.  It's nice to see someone is finally taking on the giant banks.....
more...
Michaela Cameron's comment, July 25, 2016 3:09 AM
When citizens feel that there is an inequality, then we start to see deterioration of social institutions as strain increases. When the people see giants like banks and governments being given a pass after committing criminal acts, this split in society grows. If people feel that the system is unfair or that they do not have the means to achieve the goals set for them by sociey then strain continues to grow causing more and more criminal behavior on the individual level. If banks are finally being held responsibile for their risky behaviors and criminal acts then people might feel less strain and more equality.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Attacker in Nice plotted for months with 'accomplices'

Attacker in Nice plotted for months with 'accomplices' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The man who drove a truck into a crowd in Nice, France, killing 84 people, plotted his July 14 attack for months with "support and accomplices."
more...
Bryce Schwarz's comment, July 24, 2016 4:38 AM
While it is sickening that one person could think this action was acceptable, it is worse knowing there were 6 others known to give him support in doing it. He was described as a quiet guy but how is he not on police radar after making threats and exhibiting violence in previous months. Seems crazy that someone could fly under the radar for that long and end up committing an atrocity such as this.
Kevin Lawson's comment, July 24, 2016 7:24 PM
Seems like quite the jump for him to progress from theft and assault to terrorism. Is there a way to identify potential terrorists? As the article mentioned, he hadn’t made any statements or taken action that would warrant a spot on a watch list. So how do we stop other individuals from making the same decision? As far as ISIS is concerned, we are doing a lot to monitor communications where it’s possible, but methods such as the dark web make this much more difficult. Speaking to terrorists to gain more information firsthand would be helpful, but their radical belief system often makes this difficult as they prefer to die in the attack itself. If he hadn’t been shot at the scene, Bouhel’s testimony could have proved helpful in identifying ISIS recruitment methods and painting a picture of future would-be terrorists.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Fairbanks pot industry gears up despite uncertainty

Fairbanks pot industry gears up despite uncertainty | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — New government proposals are being made to curb the evolving cannabis industry in the Fairbanks North Star Borough.
more...
Lydia Weiss's comment, July 24, 2016 5:05 PM
I agree with the person that said that if we can have places that sell alcohol, then it should be the same with marijuana as long as it is regulated the same and can still have DUIs given. Basically, just get a DD. Either way, even when it was illegal, if people wanted to smoke they were gonna smoke. With its legalization, the state can at least profit from that. It kind of annoys me, however, that a lot of progressive laws such as this, or gay marriage, etc. are fought and states/counties immediately scramble to make it illegal if they can as soon as it's legalized. If it's been legal for a while and there's problems, sure, but people don't even give chances for progression.