Criminology and Economic Theory
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
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The paradox of the ghetto

The paradox of the ghetto | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE poorest people in Leicester by a wide margin are the Somalis who live in the St Matthews housing estate. Refugees from civil war, who often passed through Sweden...
Rob Duke's insight:

Yeah, true for most of the country, but in California there's been a weird exception (Prop. 98) that means funding comes from the state and is mostly equal throughout the state dependent on a particular school's daily census (pupils attending that day).  Despite this, California's schools are still unequal.

Maybe it's more than tax structure that holds kids back in America....?

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Julius Matilainen's comment, February 7, 2015 9:42 PM
It truly is hard to say which kind of class sizes and other conditions in the school make it work the best. I´d approach the question on the community's perspective. If the teachers, parents and kids are share quite similar values and they care about their community in my (not so broad) experience, kids are usually more successful in their studies, just simply because they care. They care for each other and their parents even for the teachers. So i consider it important that teachers are local, or that they share some kind of connection to the community.

But again its never that simple. It is a very complicated issue that has many different variables. Its impossible to predict the successful formula. And even if you thought you'd find one, it will never apply on everywhere.
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French Police Detain 8 People in Anti-Terrorism Raids in Paris, Lyon - Wall Street Journal

French Police Detain 8 People in Anti-Terrorism Raids in Paris, Lyon - Wall Street Journal | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

French police detained eight people in antiterrorism raids in Paris and Lyon as part of a crackdown on radical Islamist recruiting groups, said the Interior Ministry.


Via Marc Van den Broeck
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The Changing Economics of Single Motherhood

The Changing Economics of Single Motherhood | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Women made remarkable gains in society in the last 30 years, but single mothers were left behind. To understand why, we need a more nuanced understanding of who single moms are.
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How Prohibition Put the Cocaine in Coca-Cola

How Prohibition Put the Cocaine in Coca-Cola | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When the beverage first debuted in 1886, it was described as "Coca-Cola: The Temperance Drink."
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Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 2015 1:59 AM
At first read, my initial comment is "So we'll put a ban on alcohol, but add in addictive drugs/chemicals into our drinks and that's perfectly fine. Sounds about right."
I gave a bit of a laugh to myself and then took a glance at what my surrounding friends were consuming. Coke, Mountain Dew, Coffee, Red Bull..all these drinks with tremendous amounts of chemicals in them and adverse affects to prolonged usage of them.

Back to the article though, I think its humorous that Coke was only created to compete with a different drink that was sweeping the nation by storm.
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Americans Overestimate Class Mobility

Americans Overestimate Class Mobility | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
New research finds we believe class boundaries are more porous than they are in reality.
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Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 2015 2:08 AM
"Rags to Riches" or the "American Dream", whatever you choose to call it is still alive and well. The idea that through hard work and determination, anyone can achieve greatness, I believe that is still around.
It is harder to achieve than it was initially, but it is still there.
From this article, we see that there is a general difference in the mobility of different groups of people. It's easier of course, for someone who comes from a wealthy and well connected family to make something big of themselves where-as a child who comes from a poor and troubled family will have to work harder to overcome a multitude of obstacles to reach "success".
I think a real problem with our culture, is that many of us confuse needs with wants. To live within our needs and not above them. You don't need the best car or the newest cell phone, you just need a car and you just need a cell phone. Or maybe you don't even need either. Ya know?
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How to Beat a Polygraph

How to Beat a Polygraph | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Visualize cool beers on warm summer nights.
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Kyle May's comment, February 5, 2015 7:09 PM
I think it is very interesting that many states and even some federal courts have the polygraph as inadmissible for evidence. This questions why do we keep it if our federal government doesn't trust it? This goes back to what we talked about how fingerprinting isn't 100% with the misidentification of a Brandon Mayfield for the Madrid Spain Bombing. Fingerprinting is much more reliable. If the fingerprints match, generally it's your person. It's extremely hard to tell if someone is lying, and if you're nervous when taking the polygraph - it could be seen that you're lying even though you aren't.
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The Role of Public Spaces After Tragedy

The Role of Public Spaces After Tragedy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The urban environment functions as more than just a setting. It also gives meaning to demonstrations, like the one happening in Paris.
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The Toddlers Are on to You

The Toddlers Are on to You | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new study suggests children as young as 13 months understand more about social interactions and intentions than we'd previously thought.
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Does threat of punishment deter psychopaths? Their brains respond differently, brain scans show

Does threat of punishment deter psychopaths? Their brains respond differently, brain scans show | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The brains of violent offenders with psychopathic personalities don’t process punishment in the same way as other offenders, according to an MRI study.The Daily Beast summarizes the study of
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Colorado is making so much money from cannabis it's having to give some back to citizens

Colorado is making so much money from cannabis it's having to give some back to citizens | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Colorado's marijuana experiment has been an empirically rousing success thus far, with crime down and tourism up, and now the state has collected so much money in tax from sales of pot that it might be legally obliged to give some back.
Rob Duke's insight:

Alaska could use the revenue right now....

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Kyle May's comment, February 5, 2015 7:16 PM
I'm glad that Colorado led the way with this. This study, which is turning out to have more states in support of it, could potentially free up a lot of time within our Justice system. With decrimilization of pot, and legalizing sale - the tax money can help the local area. As you said Rob, Alaska could use this right now. Our economy is suffering from the lack of oil cost. The reduced cost of having police work, court time, and prison time costs being reduced due to Marijuana related crimes.
Raquel Young's comment, February 11, 2015 1:22 AM
You also have to look at the population of colorado. They have a way more people and thats why they are doing so well with the sales.
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What counts as a home and who is really homeless?

What counts as a home and who is really homeless? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
San Francisco's homeless problem has vexed the city for decades and is important enough to the Obama administration that the president sent his chief of staff out to walk the streets last week in the biennial homeless count.

The count determines the level of federal funding so the city g

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Destine Edgeworth's comment, February 3, 2015 4:21 PM
That's crazy that is a lot of kids going without homes.
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, February 3, 2015 5:38 PM
Being homeless is something that I could never imagine, and it is sad that the number is constantly rising. Everyone's situation is different, some of those that are homeless could have probably prevented it, but then there are those who have done everything they could and are still homeless. It is especially sad that there has been an 85% rise in homeless students, even more sad that only 1 in 10 are eligible for federal housing assistance. Children are helpless when it comes to having a home, they shouldn't have to worry about where they are going to sleep, eat, get their clothes etc. They should be focusing on their school and future. I think that more needs to be done for homeless children, as this can really impact them and their future in a negative way. I hope that in the future, legislation does realize that these children need their help and real housing. Hopefully something can be done for the qualifications for children to get housing.
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Americans Think Upward Mobility Is Far More Common Than It Really Is

Americans Think Upward Mobility Is Far More Common Than It Really Is | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Abel Santiago serves a customer at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Santa Monica, California.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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The means to an end

Audio and Video content on Economist.com requires a browser that can handle iFrames. OVER 40,000 Americans committed suicide in 2012: approximately one death...
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S&P to pay $1.4 billion for role in the financial crisis

While not admitting wrongdoing, Standard & Poor’s Financial Services agreed to pay almost $1.4 billion to settle allegations by the Justice Department that credit ratings for high-risk mortgage securities mislead investors before the 2008 financial crisis. Judy Woodruff discusses implications of the penalty with Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood and Lynn Stout of Cornell University. Continue reading →
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Raising the Minimum Wage Will Have No Effect on Jobs

Raising the Minimum Wage Will Have No Effect on Jobs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
According to an analysis of 64 different studies.
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Rob Duke's comment, February 7, 2015 12:14 AM
That depends entirely on the elasticity of the sector. If the sector is in high demand, then price can probably stretch to cover the extra expense; however, if the item is not in high demand, then the "incidence" of the cost increase (not unlike a tax in this case) would likely fall on the business owner. In actual practice what we find in most industries is that 1/2 the tax is passed on to the consumer and businesses absorb the rest from their former profits.
Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 2015 1:53 AM
As it's been said, raising the minimum wage would be a temporary fix to a long running issue. I've had this conversation with different people and we come across a certain middle ground that we can all agree on.
For service industries such as McDonalds where most younger people work at, the increase in salary should be minimal. However, if say an employee is a mother/father or a main supporter in their family or meets certain criteria, they should be eligible for a higher increase in pay. These workers should have to submit to drug testing while they receive this higher rate of income and have to fulfill different forms and meet certain needs to be eligible to these benefits.
Raising the bar for every job would hurt our economy in a tremendous way and as said before, would only be a fix for the short run. Prices on many goods and services would increase as labor costs rose and it would create this never ending cycle of "I 'need' more to survive in this economy."
Rob Duke's comment, February 9, 2015 3:11 AM
I'm more for "let the market sort out wages" if we had affordable benefits and housing (I don't mean "free", but within reach, but also, with incentive to move on, when possible).
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How Bankers Manipulate Rating Agencies to Get Their Way

How Bankers Manipulate Rating Agencies to Get Their Way | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Wall Street pressed S&P, Moody’s, and Fitch to assign more favorable credit ratings to their tobacco bonds deals and bragged that the raters complied. Now many of the bonds are headed for default.
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Growing Up Poor Has Effects on Your Children Even If You Escape Poverty

Growing Up Poor Has Effects on Your Children Even If You Escape Poverty | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Breaking the cycle of poverty is more difficult than just moving out or moving up.
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Jeffrey Evan's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:45 AM

I personally believe that you tend to grow up to be what your environment consists of.  Just because you make it out of poverty, moving out or moving up would not change how you always come about doing things.  You tend to carry it around as a weight on your shoulders unless you try to shake it off. People basically absorb their environments, that is my opinion.

Christopher L. Baca's comment, February 9, 2015 2:17 AM
This article directly goes into learned behaviors that branch off of Differential Association Theory. Directly from the article, there is a multitude of facts and figures that support the notion of Differential Association theory and the affects that an environment has on individuals. Even if you get away from those environments, individuals learned skills and ideas to thrive in these types of areas and as such will have a higher rate of continued use with these already learned behaviors.
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The Experience of Dignity: Community Courts and the Future of the Criminal Justice System

The Experience of Dignity: Community Courts and the Future of the Criminal Justice System | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
At the Red Hook Community Justice Center in Brooklyn, the idea is deceptively simple: People are more likely to get better if you treat them with fairness and respect.
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(Even More) Unintended Consequences of Police Use of Force

(Even More) Unintended Consequences of Police Use of Force | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mistrust and resentment may make arrestees more violent once they’re in prison.
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How to Convince Someone They've Committed a Crime

How to Convince Someone They've Committed a Crime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new study finds that providing true details mixed with a fake event convinces two in three the story was real.
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DNA Solves 1981 Murder of 17-Year-Old Duluth Woman

DNA Solves 1981 Murder of 17-Year-Old Duluth Woman | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Investigators have finally solved the 1981 murder of 17-year-old Carolyn Andrew. They said new technology led them to a DNA match, Cecil Wayne Oliver. Police said Oliver killed himself in 1988 at the age of 30.
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Alaska state senator: Make NYC's Central Park a wilderness area

Alaska state senator: Make NYC's Central Park a wilderness area | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Anchorage Republican lawmaker has a suggestion for where President Barack should look for America's next wilderness area.
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Have some Fed BLM cops stopping people and writing tickets for feeding squirrels out of season....

 

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'Peaceful School' conference: Justice, empathy and equity in classrooms

'Peaceful School' conference: Justice, empathy and equity in classrooms | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Saint Mary's lecturer Dr. Toni Antoinette Johns keynote speaker for 2015
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Psychology: the man who studies everyday evil

Psychology: the man who studies everyday evil | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Why are some people extraordinarily selfish, manipulative, and unkind? David Robson asks the scientist delving into the darkest sides of the human mind.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Rob Duke's insight:

Dirty deeds done dirt cheap?

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Destine Edgeworth's comment, February 3, 2015 3:50 PM
That's kind of scary to think about since I myself am defiantly a night owl.
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Pedestrian Bell: The Urban Gadget We’ve Been Waiting For

Pedestrian Bell: The Urban Gadget We’ve Been Waiting For | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Living in an urban area has all sorts of advantages, but every urbanite knows the frustration of moving through a crowded street or on a busy sidewalk when you're in a hurry. A couple from Tokyo comes up with a long-awaited solution — a little bell for pedestrians to notify others they have to go out of the way.
Rob Duke's insight:

And now, from the Tokyo office....

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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, February 3, 2015 5:46 PM
This is a really neat idea, but also incredibly hilarious. I don't even think that this is something that we should have. First of all, people who are running for exercise shouldn't be doing it on crowded streets. They should do that in a park, or a gym-a place that is meant for that sort of thing. Second, dividing the streets into two lanes- one for people using their phones, and a fast lane??? This is crazy! I absolutely hate it when people are walking and staring into their phones, it should be illegal or something. Many times, in a crowded street there isn't a lot of room for people to move anyway. If someone rings a bell, I doubt that people will be likely to move out of the way. Most people are just as selfish and in a hurry as the next to get to their destination. So, why would they move out of the way for you?