Criminology and Economic Theory
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Stalker in the Attic: The Cyberbully Who Spies on 12-Year-Old Girls in Their Home

Stalker in the Attic: The Cyberbully Who Spies on 12-Year-Old Girls in Their Home | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It started as a sixth grade cyberbullying case. Then their stalker started to describe what they were wearing ... from inside their house.
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“Conspiracy theorist” in panda suit shot after allegedly threatening to bomb Baltimore Fox affiliate if it wouldn’t cover his story

“Conspiracy theorist” in panda suit shot after allegedly threatening to bomb Baltimore Fox affiliate if it wouldn’t cover his story | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
He demanded Fox put him on air to discuss his government conspiracy. Police did not kill the man, who is white
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Under the category: sounds made up, but it's not!
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There’s something missing from our drug laws: Science

There’s something missing from our drug laws: Science | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Congress and President Obama are under pressure to reschedule marijuana. While rescheduling makes sense, it doesn’t solve the state/federal conflict over marijuana (de-scheduling would be better). But more important, it wouldn’t fix the broken scheduling system. Ideally, marijuana reform should be part of a broader bill rewriting the Controlled Substances Act.
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Jessica Obermiller's comment, Today, 12:36 AM
Science is missing from a lot of things. I agree that science, good sound, well tested science is indeed missing from our drug laws. People need to start looking at sources from where they are getting their information.
Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:07 AM
I have always thought the drug scheduling was a little off. A reform that is scientifically based would be very good for the system. Hopefully this could also lead to fewer addicts in prison, and more receiving the help they need.
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Spurring investment in an immigrant neighborhood | CNU

Spurring investment in an immigrant neighborhood | CNU | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Southwest Detroit is the kind of neighborhood that few people talk about outside of the Motor City. The community is not one of those that are vacant and dilapidated—the subject of "ruin porn" photos on the web. It's also not booming with development like Downtown and Midtown.   

Aside from small-scale maintenance, the immigrant community of craftspeople, artists, and entrepreneurs has seen little investment for years. The residents are trying hard to prevent a downward spiral—yet many of their children don't plan on sticking around as adults.

"These kids can see the disinvestment in their community. They’re not blind," says architect Dhiru Thadani, the leader of a recent CNU "Legacy Charrette" in the neighborhood. "And they see how suburban communities have been invested in, and people are taking care of their streets, and their lawns, and their backyards." If nothing changes, many young adults will move to greener pastures.
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Convict Cultivation: Growing Organic Behind Bars - Modern Farmer

Convict Cultivation: Growing Organic Behind Bars - Modern Farmer | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Woodbourne is a largely conventional prison, for largely conventional prisoners. With one caveat: It's unlikely you'll learn to massage and dry kale at most other lockups.

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The War on Drugs Isn't Even Working in Prison

The War on Drugs Isn't Even Working in Prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Frequent urine tests, controversial scanners, and false positives.

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max mckernan's comment, April 27, 1:06 PM
this i imagine in more places than just California i imagine that this is all over the country.
Raquel Young's comment, Today, 6:22 AM
I also think that it probably in more places around the country and this has been a problem of a long time is there a way to stop this from happening?
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Did Mexican drug cartel carry out Ohio family murders?

Did Mexican drug cartel carry out Ohio family murders? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Investigators are looking into the possibility of a Mexico drug cartel killing eight members of an Ohio family in a pre-planned execution. It has been four days since bodies of the Rhoden family were found in multiple homes. According to law enforcement, there were about 200 marijuana plants growing in some of the homes. David Begnaud reports from Pike County, Ohio.
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Do you see any Al Capones dealing alcohol today? Nope. Just legalize/decriminalize drugs and these types of killings will fade into history....
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The disturbing thing scientists learned when they bribed babies with graham crackers

The disturbing thing scientists learned when they bribed babies with graham crackers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How researchers convinced babies to abandon their morals
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Forrest Smoes's comment, April 27, 8:21 PM
I think this supports the idea that humans are by in large very selfish, greedy, immoral people at the core. Babies' minds are a wonderful showcase for human nature. Babies are humans with the absolute minimum of cultural influence – they don't have many friends, have never been to school and haven't read any books. They can't even control their own bowels, let alone speak the language, so their minds are as close to innocent as a human mind can get.
Jessica Obermiller's comment, Today, 12:40 AM
This just made me laugh. I have this image in my head of babies being bribed and it is just pretty darn funny. As a mother I can see how that works. As a scientist though, I think this is an interesting study. I agree with Forrest, babies have such unique, untouched minds. But than again, we also don't know all what babies are born knowing. Nature vs. nurture all over again.
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French revolution

French revolution | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A TRAFFIC intersection may not seem an obvious subject for metaphysical reflection. But in France, few aspects of life escape philosophical investigation. Now it is the turn of the roundabout, a humble road-junction improvement which is invading the French landscape and unsettling the order of things. Uncommon in France a generation ago, they number some 30,000 today—more than in Britain, which invented the modern version—and an estimated 500 more are built each year. According to a French radio programme, they are not merely a tool for traffic management and road safety, but “an example of when the absurd becomes banal.”  

It was a French town planner and architect, Eugène Hénard, who in the early 1900s invented what is officially known as a carrefour giratoire (gyratory crossroad). New York built the first, Columbus Circle, in 1905. Two years later, Hénard installed his version in Paris, designed to circumnavigate the Arc de Triomphe from the star of avenues that lead to it, which were laid out by Baron Haussmann in the mid-19th century. To this day, this form of traffic circle obliges vehicles already circulating to give way to those approaching, in line with the French rule of giving priority to cars coming from the right. The modern roundabout, by contrast, pioneered by British traffic engineers, forces vehicles approaching from an access road to await a gap in circulating traffic.
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Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:20 AM
Always interesting to see what other countries do. Either way, people need to actually know how to drive and pay attention for it to work.
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Sheriff: 'Well-planned and methodical' execution of Ohio family | Fox News

Sheriff: 'Well-planned and methodical' execution of Ohio family | Fox News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The execution-style murders of eight Ohio family members Friday were “methodical and well-planned,” officials said Sunday, revealing the investigation had uncovered three marijuana growing operations — while also warning residents who felt they were in danger to “to be armed.”
Rob Duke's insight:
Look for the money, relationships, and the drugs.  The usual motives.  But, this is also a product of institutions--namely the institution of criminalized marijuana.  The profit motive is enough to inspire murder.
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Mary Dombroski's comment, April 25, 9:43 PM
The profit motive is enough, but I wouldn't doubt if additional motives transpire as the case progresses. It's interesting to me that the children were unhurt, yet this was very planned out. This reminds me of, "do this or don't do this and we'll harm your entire family...."
Wyatt Duncan's comment, April 26, 8:25 AM
It is a sad day when entire families are being executed of marijuana. Our country is turning into mexico between drug related shootings and the killing of so many law enforcement officers this year. I have a hard time believing it was only over marijuana. Also, i find it interesting that they told them to be armed… you don't hear that very often. Also that the kids were unharmed…
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The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Greenland has the world's highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

Via Velvet Martin
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Wyatt Duncan's comment, April 26, 8:30 AM
After having such a great night, drinking with friends and killing the arctics most ferocious animal. To turn down hill so quickly is sad, and unexplainable. We are having the same epidemic here in alaska and have been for a long time…
Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:26 AM
This is a sad story and a great example of why we should not be telling people where to work and where to live.
Raquel Young's comment, Today, 6:38 AM
This is so sad and it happens far to often.
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Spy Chief Pressed for Number of Americans Ensnared in Data Espionage

Spy Chief Pressed for Number of Americans Ensnared in Data Espionage | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
U.S. lawmakers are pressing the nation’s top intelligence official to estimate the number of Americans ensnared in email surveillance and other such spying on foreign targets, saying the information was needed to gauge possible reforms to the controversial programs.

Eight Democrats and six Republicans made the request to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper in a letter seen by Reuters on Friday, reflecting the continued bipartisan concerns over the scope of U.S. data espionage.
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Nosedive

Nosedive | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Credit for this decline must go to policing and changing fashion. In the 1970s and early 1980s, cocaine users were either well-off or had disposable income to waste. By the mid-1980s most cocaine was being smoked as crack by poorer Americans. Sentencing laws changed and incarceration rates, especially for young black men, began to soar. One 1986 study showed that in Manhattan 78% of those who agreed to be tested after an arrest for a serious crime tested positive for cocaine. In 1985 there were nearly 6m cocaine-users, according to the University of Michigan’s national household survey on drug use.
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Permission to speak, sir

Permission to speak, sir | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE table was round, suggesting there might be a discussion. But Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, Egypt’s president, had no intention of letting his guests speak. For nearly two hours on April 13th he defended his policies before a group of officials and journalists on state television. When he finally stopped, there was applause, then silence. One politician tried to ask a question, but Mr Sisi cut him off: “I did not give permission for anyone to speak.”

The president must dream of controlling the public in such a way—and oh, how he’s tried, cracking down on civil society and banning protests. But criticism of Mr Sisi has grown louder of late, culminating in a burst of outrage over his decision to cede two uninhabited islands in the Red Sea, called Sanafir and Tiran, to Saudi Arabia. As pressure has mounted, Mr Sisi has looked unsteady. The once-beloved former general appears shocked and angered by the public’s lack of obedience.
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What We Learned From German Prisons

What We Learned From German Prisons | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ARLIER this summer, we led a delegation of people concerned about the United States criminal justice system to visit some prisons in Germany and observe their conditions. What we saw was astonishing.
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How a Kentucky career woman began a second life as a bank robber

How a Kentucky career woman began a second life as a bank robber | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Crystal Little, the same woman who worked for the University of Kentucky's Office of Research Integrity, an organization obsessed with rules and guidelines in the pursuit of "support[ing] the institution in promoting ethical conduct of research." The same woman who, as a student at UK, worked as an editor for the Kentucky Kernal, earning it one of college journalism's highest accolades - a Pacemaker Award - for reporting from Africa on the AIDS crisis. The same woman who helped raise her niece when her parents weren't around, according to the Herald-Leader.

The same woman who served as the primary caretaker for her mother, who suffered from multiple sclerosis.

In fact, caring for her mother is what she claims led her to rob four banks. Without the money from Little's first bank robbery, the ailing woman may have been kicked out of her nursing home.

Recently, the 32-year-old sat down with the Kentucky Kernal, the student newspaper where she was once a rising star, to discuss what led a woman who claims to have never so much as smoked a cigarette to become a serial bank robber. She gave the interview from her Casey County jail cell in Liberty, Ky., where she's been since March 9, 2014, barely two years into a 10-year sentence.
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David's comment, April 27, 9:05 PM
Wow, that is a sad story, but predictable. Apperently working in University did not cover all the expenses that she had to pay. I dont know what Ill do if my mother were sick, but I dont wish that to anybody else.
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When we sleep in new places, half of our brain stays awake

When we sleep in new places, half of our brain stays awake | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“How did you sleep?” I’ve asked countless friends this question after they’ve spent a night on my (surprisingly comfortable) couch. Turns out, most of them probably lied when they said, “Great!”
Difficulty sleeping in a new environment is so common that neuroscientists have a name for it: the “first-night effect” (FNE). New research shows FNE is basically the neurological equivalent of sleeping with one eye open. When you go to sleep for the first time in a new environment only half of your brain really rests, according to a study recently published in Current Biology.
The researchers tested people sleeping in a new environment by measuring their brainwave activity in the third stage of non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM 3), which is the deepest stage of the sleep cycle. In their first experiment, the researchers found that sleeping subjects experienced much more activity in the left hemisphere of their brains than in the right hemisphere on the first night of sleep, indicating that the left hemisphere remained relatively alert to the surrounding environment.
Rob Duke's insight:
Now this explains a lot....
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Jessica Obermiller's comment, Today, 12:37 AM
I agree, my first night or two, okay, maybe ten, in a new place are not the best. It is almost as if the defensive part f my brain does not want me to fully let my guard down.
Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:10 AM
I am curious how this transfers into prisons every time a prisoner to transferred within the prison. They have to always be defensive while in prison, this would just add to it.
Raquel Young's comment, Today, 6:11 AM
I can see where they are coming from Im a very hard sleeper and can really sleep anywhere but I'm not always getting rested when I'm sleeping at a new place.
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Building a Prison-to-Promise Pipeline

Building a Prison-to-Promise Pipeline | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This week is the inaugural  National Reentry Week, designated by the U.S. Department of Justice to draw attention to the challenges faced by people returning to their communities after incarceratio…

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Colorado poacher gets big fine after illegal elk killing

Colorado poacher gets big fine after illegal elk killing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Three other men also face fines for related crimes
Staff Report
A Colorado man has been ordered to pay more than $14,000 in fines after pleading guilty to numerous poaching charges charges.
According to Colorado Parks and Wildlife, 59-year-old Melvin Weaver killed three bull elk on the Uncompahgre Plateau west of Montrose last fall, then called friends and told them to come to the location and to use their licenses to claim the animals as their own. In Colorado, hunters can only tag animals that they have shot themselves.

Via pdeppisch
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pdeppisch's comment, April 28, 6:25 PM
Agreed! My neighbour is a hunter and has a hunting camp and the eat all that they kill. I prefer hunting with a camera. And nature being nature I feed birds and of course the doves and pigeons come and guess what - we now have a hawk and he seems to be successful.
max mckernan's comment, April 28, 11:27 PM
I would say the charges are justified but i would also say that the state wanted to make an example. however the fact that he called his friends to claim the animals. this alone is an admission of guilt. There was a case like that here in Alaska very recently however the case plead out in court.
Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:17 AM
I would like to see him pay a lot for what he did. There is no excuse for that.
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Stamping it out

Stamping it out | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Counterfeiting and piracy cover an immense gamut: from synthetic cinnamon to fake Louis Vuitton luggage to copies of the world’s most elaborately programmed computer software. Some manufacturers and distributors are out-and-out hoodlums: investigations in America, Canada and Sweden have linked biker gangs to counterfeit medicines, notably drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction. Others are guileful entrepreneurs who would doubtless shrink from other areas of organised crime. A Chinese woman accused of selling bogus branded luxury goods worth millions of dollars was found last year to be living in a quiet Californian suburb, studying for a university degree.

Measured by the number of customs seizures, footwear was the most-affected industry in each of the three years studied by the OECD, from 2011 to 2013. Other popular items to rip off included clothing, electrical equipment, leather goods and watches. The country that suffers most from trademark infringement is, of course, America. Next is Italy, a country long notorious for making sham products, but which is also home to many of the world’s most envied brands.

Globalisation has enabled traffickers to run rings round officialdom, says Candice Li, vice-president of the International Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition (IACC), a lobby group. “There isn’t an international legal or enforcement framework with which to confront the problem,” she says. Counterfeiters can make parts in one country, assemble a product in a second and package it in a third—without stepping outside the law in any of them.

Even when laws are broken, the risks are slight. “Nobody is sitting in jail for taking fake shampoo or bouillon cubes across international borders,” says Hans Schwab, the founder of Illicit Trade Monitor, a website. “[Drug] cartels in South America are starting to move towards the counterfeiting of consumer products because it is more lucrative, and there is no need for bribes or fast boats or planes.”

Establishing the origins of internationally traded counterfeit or pirated goods is not easy. Distributors go to great lengths to zig-zag around the world. A consignment of counterfeit versions of Avastin, a cancer drug, found in America in 2012 had travelled through Turkey, Switzerland, Denmark and Britain. Free-trade zones are particularly favoured as transit points—as are poorly governed or war-torn countries. Afghanistan, Syria and Yemen are all leading countries of provenance.
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Prison-Reform Policy Prop 47 Is ‘Broken,’ Says City Attorney

Prison-Reform Policy Prop 47 Is ‘Broken,’ Says City Attorney | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When California voters approved Proposition 47 in November 2014, it marked a new era of crime and punishment in the state.
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Ex-classmate: Wis. prom shooter was bullied about hygiene

Ex-classmate: Wis. prom shooter was bullied about hygiene | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Jakob Wagner shot 2 outside a high school prom before being killed by police.
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David's comment, April 27, 9:31 PM
This problem going on all over the country. There should be stricter rules for buying weapons. Its getting real a big problem.
Raquel Young's comment, Today, 6:44 AM
I think that gun aren't the only problem in this case I'm not saying that it isn't but kids who get bullied is making these kids messed up for life and they are okay with doing such things as this. Theres more of a problem that is hard for one to catch because they dont want to talk about it them so no one knows just like in the video he was a good kid and was outgoing to the older generation. Its so sad.
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Federal Officers Injured in Kansas Motel Shootout

Federal Officers Injured in Kansas Motel Shootout | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Three federal officers and a fourth member of law enforcement were shot while searching for a suspect at a Kansas motel Saturday night.
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Wyatt Duncan's comment, April 26, 8:21 AM
The mentality of people these days, thinking it is okay and the easy way out to shoot at law enforcement officers. My guess as sad as it is, would be that this individual has a long record of criminal history and has no respect for authority. It was him, and him alone that caused them to be there.
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Utah and the war on porn: Our long national history of condemning “obscenity” as public enemy #1

Utah and the war on porn: Our long national history of condemning “obscenity” as public enemy #1 | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The latest pornography "health crisis" is part of a cycle of hysteria and fear that dates back to the Civil War
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Forrest Smoes's comment, April 27, 8:21 PM
I think that pornography is a very dangerous and damaging thing to our health. I think it has adverse physical and emotional effects. Watching porn has been proven to change the functionality of the brain by secreting different chemicals and hormones that create unhealthy highs and lows similar to drug use. It can cause sex drive problems and sexual dysfunctions in men. Beyond that it objectifies humans, reinforces poor treatment of people, and ultimately can destroy either already established relationships or future ones. I think it brings out unhealthy insecurities and lessons the value people have. It can cause immense intimacy problems in marriages and relationships. I don’t think that there is a clear solution to the porn problem America has but I do think porn should be a condemned behavior.
Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:33 AM
I have always found the pros and cons of porn to be very interesting. Overall, I think there are many problems with having porn so readily available to everyone, including children. Psychologically, there are many issues associated with porn. There are also so many issues and crimes revolving around porn. I agree with Utah on the fact it is a health crisis. Most people do not understand how serious these problems can be.
Raquel Young's comment, Today, 6:24 AM
I think that they are going a little far on this one. I have been to Utah and there is a major issue with the air there I think that what they are breathing in should come before something that people are watching.
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Prayer, police and punishment

Prayer, police and punishment | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mr Martínez is a brave man. To research his first book, “The Beast”, he rode Mexico’s trains with migrants clinging to the roofs as they headed towards America. Here he interviews inmates in prisons racked with violence, tracks down the “coyotes” who arrange travel for desperate immigrants and spends time with a hitman from the Mara Salvatrucha, El Salvador’s most infamous gang, who says that his kill tally is “about 56”.

The chronicles are all dispiriting in their different ways, either because of the horrors they reveal or because of the insights they give into politicians and police forces that are too corrupt, impoverished or incompetent to respond.
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Oklahoma man claims to be time-traveling food bandit

Oklahoma man claims to be time-traveling food bandit | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the future, everyone will get food by manhandling restaurant managers and then stealing a handful of chicken and bacon.  
Rob Duke's insight:
Seems legit.  And here we thought the future was taken over by machines....
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Courtney Antilla's comment, Today, 2:35 AM
Seems like a great way to get more food. Creative thinking on his part.