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FBI focusing on recovery of paintings stolen in ‘90 Boston art heist

FBI focusing on recovery of paintings stolen in ‘90 Boston art heist | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
BOSTON — Just after midnight on March 18, 1990, two men posing as police officers pulled off the single largest property heist in U.S. history, stealing 13 pieces of artwork worth as much as $500 million.
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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7 Little Things That Almost Everyone Steals

7 Little Things That Almost Everyone Steals | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Even if you're not a thief or bank robber, odds are you've stolen at least one of these items.
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‘United States creating prison planet’

‘United States creating prison planet’ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An interview with Randy Short, a human rights activist, Washington

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The Pornography of Jihadism

The Pornography of Jihadism | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What ISIS videos and X-rated movies have in common
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Lebanon Blocks Six Porn Sites, Sparks Fears of Further Censorship · Global Voices

Lebanon Blocks Six Porn Sites, Sparks Fears of Further Censorship · Global Voices | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Internet users worry that the decision, made by the Ministry of Justice, could lead the government down a slippery slope to greater censorship.
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Mamie Davis's comment, September 13, 2:22 AM
I think the backlash against the banning of the porn websites is entirely correct even if the judge who imposed the ban was trying to do it to remove "kiddie" porn (which it was discovered not to be). I think its worrisome that a government organization in Lebanon, the Ministry of Justice issued the order to block the six cites but there are no other government agencies to act as a check and balance to prevent religiously bias, ultra conservative or unjust laws from being implemented. The Ministry of Telecommunication who implemented the ban said they had no choice but that they support freedom. But if even they can't review the acts of the Ministry of Justice, that absolute power will most definitely lead to corruption.
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Oscar Pistorius verdict: What's next?

Oscar Pistorius verdict: What's next? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Now that a judge has found him guilty of negligent homicide, what's next for the man known as the Blade Runner?
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Police charge toddler for 'coercion'

Police charge toddler for 'coercion' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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Oscar Pistorius case: Is South Africa's legal system reliable?

Oscar Pistorius case: Is South Africa's legal system reliable? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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The Oscar Pistorius Trial: How It Started

The Oscar Pistorius Trial: How It Started | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In March 2013, TIME took a deep look at the origins of the case
Rob Duke's insight:

No jury, but as an Inquisitorial system, the judge has the burden to make sure the innocent are not wrongly convicted....

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Oscar Pistorius Not Guilty of Murder; Court Adjourns With Lesser Charge Pending

Oscar Pistorius Not Guilty of Murder; Court Adjourns With Lesser Charge Pending | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Judge Thokozile Matilda Masipa is expected to rule on Friday on the remaining charge of “culpable homicide” in the killing of Reeva Steenkamp.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's a hybrid system in South Africa, that using an inquisitorial system of civil law (with some elements of common law based upon earlier precedents; and, with the prosecution taking an adversarial stance during some of the cross-examination).  In this case, the courts, prosecution, and the police worked to convict, but also to clear the innocent (perhaps too much towards proving innocence by American standards--in this case).  Let me know what you think.

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Christopher Smith's comment, September 11, 12:48 PM
First of all, Pistorius acted to hastly indeed with his firearm. There was no need to fire that many rounds into a bathroom. Somebody was trigger happy. Furthermore, I don't understand why the Judge would dismiss the testimonies from the neighbors and the evidence from the text messaging app. I think that they may be enough evidence to support a finding a manslaughter and that is something that the Judge is going probably review with her two aids. I'm watching this to see what happens next.
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UAA report suggests drug arrests on decline in Alaska

UAA report suggests drug arrests on decline in Alaska | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Since 2000, juvenile marijuana arrests have increased while arrests for narcotics have fallen, and adults have seen a decline in both marijuana and narcotics arrests, according to a report from the University of Alaska Anchorage Justice Center.
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Christopher Smith's comment, September 11, 1:53 AM
This is a good research project to do that obviously took some serious time to compile these statistics. The sad thing about Ballot Measure 2 now is that simply, the DA won't prosecute marijuana possession charges anymore, so the numbers for arrests stemming from marijuana will certainly be decreasing even further.
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Gov. Jerry Brown: Nearly 30% of CA Kids Illegal or 'Don't Speak English'

Gov. Jerry Brown: Nearly 30% of CA Kids Illegal or 'Don't Speak English' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
During Thursday night's California gubernatorial debate against Republican Neel Kashkari, California Governor Jerry Brown (D) revealed that nearly 30% of the state's schoolchildren are either illegal immigrants or do not speak English.

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Revealed: Lithuanian mobsters behind human trafficking gangs organising slaves to shoplift from Scottish stores

Revealed: Lithuanian mobsters behind human trafficking gangs organising slaves to shoplift from Scottish stores | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
MANY of those being forced by crooks to shoplift from Scottish high streets are young females from eastern Europe.

Via Dana Hoffman, up2-21
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In Northwest Arctic, teens to lead the way in suicide prevention

In Northwest Arctic, teens to lead the way in suicide prevention | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
For the last five years, the Northwest Arctic Borough School District has coordinated the Youth Leaders program, training students to serve as social "captains" at their schools in the region. Since the program began, the region has gone from eight student suicides in 2008 to none for the past four years.
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Victims of Gang Violence Are Targeted and Persecuted. They Deserve Asylum.

Victims of Gang Violence Are Targeted and Persecuted. They Deserve Asylum. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What kind of violence abroad should allow women and children to win asylum in the United States? The recent influx of both families and kids traveling on their own from Central America is adding the urgency of large numbers to this question. So far, the prospects for asylum look better...
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In Solitary, Inmates Languish, Despair and Attempt Suicide: Report

In Solitary, Inmates Languish, Despair and Attempt Suicide: Report | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new report details the rough treatment of inmates placed in solitary confinement at New York City's largest jail system, Rikers Island.

Via Concerned Citizen, up2-21
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Who gets murdered

Who gets murdered | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In 2012 America reported 14,827 cases of murder and manslaughter, two-thirds of which were carried out with guns. That is 4.7 homicides per 100,000 people: the...
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Watch: Malala shooting suspects arrested

Watch: Malala shooting suspects arrested | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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Rape Culture in the Alaskan Wilderness

Rape Culture in the Alaskan Wilderness | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the tight-knit communities of the far north, there are no roads, no police officers—and higher rates of sexual assault than anywhere else in the United States.
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Mamie Davis's comment, September 13, 2:57 AM
This is a horrible part of Alaskan life. And I think its very unfortunate that these kids are born into these communities. They are born into disease ridden centers where EVERYONE knows they are more than likely going to be abused, but no one can take them away or protect them. I think the power of "tradition" and the cultural values of silence and avoidance of familial shaming is what is crippling these villages. Those values worked in more primitive times when there was no resources, there was no where to go but stay and take it. I'm talking about a hundred years ago, when Alaska was more or less without any kind of organizational structure we know today. But how can you tell someone, politically correct, that their cultural values are askew, that they are only assisting in the continuation of silence and victimization and they need to reevaluate them. Western society had to do the same, granted we had a longer period of time to do so, but we no longer practice primogeniture or stone people for witchcraft. I believe the source of the cultural power is legitimate but it is being carried out in all the wrong ways. Instead of building a healthy community in which to survive, it creates a perverse trap in which to suffer... silently.
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South Africa's justice system EXPLAINED: Oscar Pistorius, on trial for killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, faces a trial that will look much different than it would in the U.S.

South Africa's justice system EXPLAINED: Oscar Pistorius, on trial for killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, faces a trial that will look much different than it would in the U.S. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The justice system in South Africa operates differently than the one in the U.S. Here is a look at what Oscar Pistorius is facing after the double-amputee Olympic athlete was charged with premeditated murder in the Feb. 14 shooting death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.
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Scottish independence resonates in Spain's Catalonia

The Spanish region of Catalonia could briefly steal the referendum limelight from Scotland during demonstrations in Barcelona aimed at sparking momentum for those opposed to Spanish rule.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a study in comparisons.  In Spain, for decades separatism has been accompanied by terror and violence; in Scotland, a relatively peaceful vote...

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The Oscar Pistorius Trial: How It Started

The Oscar Pistorius Trial: How It Started | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In March 2013, TIME took a deep look at the origins of the case
Rob Duke's insight:

Some more background in case you're not up to speed.

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Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor

Slate - How the Suburbs Got Poor | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Before we can understand what makes some suburbs so miserable, we first have to understand what makes others succeed. The most successful suburban neighborhoods fall into two categories. First, there are the dense and walkable ones that, like the most successful urban neighborhoods, have town centers that give local residents easy access to retail and employment opportunities. These neighborhoods generally include a mix of single-family homes and apartment buildings, which allows for different kinds of families and adults at different stages of life to share in the same local amenities. The problem with these urban suburbs, as Christopher Leinberger recounts in his 2009 book The Option of Urbanism, is that there are so few of them, and this scarcity fuels the same kind of gentrification that is driving poor people out of successful cities.

 

The other model for success can be found in sprawling suburban neighborhoods dominated by households with either the time or the resources to maintain single-family homes and to engage in civic life. As a general rule, the neighborhoods in this latter category don’t allow for apartment buildings or townhomes on small lots. They implement stringent local land-use regulations that keep them exclusive, and they attract families that tenaciously defend the character of their neighborhoods.


Via Mathijs Booden, Jukka Melaranta, Deanna Dahlsad, Jocelyn Stoller
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Mamie Davis's comment, September 13, 3:18 AM
I really do think you desire as an adult what you grew up with as a child, especially if happy memories are associated with it. I grew up in a large house with a one acre yard of green grass, flowers, garden, garage, shed. We could see our neighbor's houses but they were far away enough that we didn't feel claustraphobic is we out in our yards at the same time. My parents also put up little shrubs around our yard to add to the feeling of privacy. However my friend from Spain, who I imagined lived in a house with a yard too for an entire year prior to visiting his family, lives in a flat in an apartment building. It is completely normal to him to live in a place like that your whole life. When I asked him where he went to be outside, relax and enjoy the sunshine he said they went to the street or the neighborhood center. He said only rich people lived in houses and had yards in places where you have little contact with neighbors. What I am saying is that we desire what we had as children, that the economics of our parents time and allowed them to get the place they have made an impression on us and our expectation about our future.
Rob Duke's comment, September 13, 4:02 PM
Yes, I'd agree as humans, we have a sense of place and we like what feels familiar. I've also found that public places are better when truly public. Alleys and underpasses; or those little pocket parks are not nearly as safe as laces that feel like they have "eye" (windows and door where people might be looking). As a chief, I attended planning sessions and insisted on a Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) planning approach. Thus, pockete parks became little "P" shaped culdesacs where the homes all faced the grass patch in the middle (narrow streets with parking only allowed on one side kept speeds low. Sinking the park area can also keep balls from bouncing into the street and serves as a temporary storm drainage retention pond). I'm still not convinced that even a well-designed neighborhood won't eventually become tarnished. In some ways, there's a life cycle where things become run-down for a time and then get rediscovered by a new generation of young families. Having said that I think watching the store to ensure there's a good jobs/housing mix and good design will help neighborhoods maintain their appeal.
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Police jihadi: U.S. cop nabbed attempting to join Islamic State terrorists

Police jihadi: U.S. cop nabbed attempting to join Islamic State terrorists | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
After the bombing, new fears about homegrown terror begin to rise. And the Boston suspects' Chechen family traveled a long road to find a home in the United States.
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E.oba's comment, September 11, 10:26 PM
I really wonder where along the line he found Islam and decided it was a better religion for him than his previous one (which was Catholic). I think if more research was put into understanding that ‘tipping point’ for individuals who decide they have more in common with ISIS than trying to kill/capture the current ISIS individuals we would not be as paranoid and scared as we our now (When I say ‘we’ I mean the US). Obviously I need to do more research into what Islam faith vs Catholic faith really entails, but I really think we should be more concerned with what exactly drove this man to go these extremes. I know that Islam religion does not equal ISIS, but I know ISIS claims to be Islamic and so I think it would be a good starting point to understand why some people might find it an attractive option. The article did state some events in this man’s life that led up to him trying to get to Turkey to join the group. Maybe because he felt he had so many failures in his life (being fired from his law enforcement job, serving time in prison for discharging a weapon, etc) ISIS and their goals seemed like a worthy cause for him. It’s a little unsettling, seeing a supposed ‘average Joe’ try to become a part of this organization, but it sounds like he had a series of events that brought him to such a low in his life that such a radical group like ISIS was the only option left for him?
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PLAYABLE Cities: the city that plays together, stays together

PLAYABLE Cities: the city that plays together, stays together | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Forget about smart cities, Playable City ideas – like Bristol’s water slide or its temporary play streets – are a human response to the coldness and anonymity of the urban environment (yeah: your city might aspire to be *smart*, but is it playable?

Via Margarida Sá Costa, massimo facchinetti, association concert urbain
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Bodies of 5 children missing from South Carolina found in Alabama

Bodies of 5 children missing from South Carolina found in Alabama | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Timothy Jones Jr. is awaiting extradition from Mississippi to South Carolina after the bodies of his five children, ages 1 to 8, were found along a highway in Alabama on Tuesday. The children were reported missing by their mother on Sept. 3.
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Christopher Smith's comment, September 11, 2:12 AM
This is a sad case where the effects of narcotics clouded the judgement of this man. The deaths of these kids could have been prevented if he went and sought help. I don't have any other words for this story. It is just sad what drugs can do to the human body.