Criminology and E...
Follow
Find
8.5K views | +28 today
 
Scooped by Rob Duke
onto Criminology and Economic Theory
Scoop.it!

Life ban from Greek team for Nazi salute player Giorgos Katidis

Life ban from Greek team for Nazi salute player Giorgos Katidis | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
GREEK soccer player Giorgos Katidis has been banned from his national team for life after giving a Nazi salute while celebrating a goal.
more...
Willow Weir's comment, March 21, 2013 4:10 PM
He deserves the ban, there is a big Nazi movement in Germany and I don't think this should be tolerated
Kristie Major's comment, March 23, 2013 9:44 PM
What happens if you look at this from a different perspective. I am not Nazi, but I am just curious what would happen if we tried to see this action differently. Two years ago, a football player was penalized for praying after he got a touchdown. Should people be penalized for expressing their personal beliefs. The Nazi salute is not exactly the best way to do this but who is this guy hurting by doing this. Katidis also says that he did not know that this was a Nazi salute, which is a little unbelievable, but some of us celebrate by raising our hands. Is it wrong to raise your hand to Heaven? Do people condemn movies that have the Nazi salute in them? I do not believe that it should be a crime to celebrate like this.
Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
Curated by Rob Duke
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
Scoop.it!

Brazil in 'worst water crisis'

Brazil in 'worst water crisis' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Brazil's Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira says the country's most populous states are experiencing their worst water crisis since 1930.

Via Dr Lendy Spires, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The royal road to ruin

The royal road to ruin | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a series following our print article on conflicting approaches to free speech after the terrorist attacks in Paris on January 7th, our correspondents offer more...
Rob Duke's insight:

Another in the Good Life series: Thailand: Deface a bank note; wear black on the King’s birthday; stay sitting during the national anthem…in Thailand these 'crimes' could land you in jail. The first in a series of in-depth online articles examining the threats to freedom of speech around the world...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The man of make-believe

The man of make-believe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
OVER the years, all sorts were tried. One was a navy football coach; one ran a fencing company. One was a jobbing actor in police dramas; one lived in the New York...
Rob Duke's insight:

Some insight into the good life "American-style"...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Confronting hate, prejudice, cruelty, extremism, and dogmatism
Scoop.it!

Ivory mafia: how criminal gangs are killing Africa's elephants

Ivory mafia: how criminal gangs are killing Africa's elephants | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Shortly before 11 am on the last Saturday in May, a heavily laden white Mitsubishi truck pulled into the Fuji Motors East Africa car dealership in an industrial neighbourhood on the northern edge of Mombasa.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Corbin Sandgren's comment, Today, 1:25 AM
Africa has an issue with corruption these gangs pay off officers, judges, detectives, shipping agents, custom officers, park rangers, and freight forwarders to cover themselves in case a shipment is compromised. Also the bosses cannot be pin pointed because they pay people to do their work.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Demographics of Sexual Fantasy

Demographics of Sexual Fantasy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Demographics of Sexual Fantasy: Analyzing the authorship of 290K erotic stories
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Which Cities Sleep In, And Which Get To Work Early

Which Cities Sleep In, And Which Get To Work Early | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’m not a morning person, so I appreciate living in New York. The workday here starts later than in any other American city, and about half an hour later than in the U.S. as a whole. A decade or so...
more...
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, Today, 1:44 AM
I found this article very interesting because I work a completely different schedule than the average worker. I have to be at work by 5:15am at the gym on campus to open. However, like it was stated in the article, in Alaska people normally get to work by 8:00am. I find this true. My bosses at the gym come rolling in around 8ish. I also work at an internship at a law firm where our hours are from 8am-5pm. However, one attorney doesn't come in until 9am, and another attorney rarely comes in before 10am. With the type of work they are dealing with, constantly meeting with clients, running back and forth from the court house, I probably wouldn't come in until 9am so I was well rested. This article was interesting to see a bunch of cities in America compared to one another.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

11 Months After Marijuana Legalization, Here's What's Happening to Mexican Cartels

11 Months After Marijuana Legalization, Here's What's Happening to Mexican Cartels | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There's never been a better reason to legalize it.
more...
Christopher L. Baca's comment, January 25, 6:40 PM
From firsthand experience with growing up in neighborhoods directly affected by the growth of an illegal marijuana usage, I find that the idea of legalization with certain restraints is a wonderful idea. As stated in the article, by legalizing the product, we not only cut the import and profit of cartels, but we also open a new venue that provides a new economic gain for U.S. citizens.
Riley Landeis's comment, January 25, 11:31 PM
The legalization of marijuana is a giant step forward for the US in terms of creating a taxable product as well as cutting down on the violence and illegal activities that come with the cartels
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Why wealthy Americans’ delusions about the poor are so dangerous

Why wealthy Americans’ delusions about the poor are so dangerous | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Regressive state and local tax policies don’t just harm the working class -- they can ruin entire economies
more...
Jessica Ramos's comment, January 25, 11:58 PM
I feel like the economic system is set for the rich to stay rich. We talk about everyone having an opportunity of going from drags to riches, but what are the real chances of that? With a growing population, we have more competition. Everyone inherits their parent's economic status, one percent being in charge of the world's economy. The majority of the population is lower class, meaning there is very little chance into getting in the class of the elite.
Megan Earle's comment, Today, 12:45 AM
This article goes well with this week's discussion of "the Good Life." This illustrates how even within one nation, the definition can vary from person to person. While low income families are struggling to get by and are looking at the top 1% as the example of "the Good Life," the rich are wrongly believing the the poor have it easier because they have lower taxes. While this isn't true, its hows how even topics such as tax policies can play into a culture's definition of "the Good Life."
Rescooped by Rob Duke from SocialAction2014
Scoop.it!

Living with a record: How past crimes may drive job seekers into poverty | PBS NewsHour

Living with a record: How past crimes may drive job seekers into poverty | PBS NewsHour | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Applicants with criminal backgrounds, including those with nonviolent criminal convictions or even arrests, are increasingly being driven into poverty. Even if it has been years since they've served time for past criminal infractions, those applying for jobs are often unable to find work -- especially in a climate of extreme job competition. NewsHour's Stephen Fee reports. Continue reading →

Via Darcy Delaproser
more...
Heather Wiinikka's comment, Today, 2:28 AM
It seems for people that have past records to gain employment, which i think if it isn't a horrible crime they should be allowed a chance to proof themselves. Crimes do drive job seekers into poverty because they can not get a job because of their record they can not get hired so there for they have no pay check and no means to provide and support themdelves
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

First evidence of PTSD dates back to 1300BC - USA TODAY

First evidence of PTSD dates back to 1300BC - USA TODAY | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It's not uncommon for modern-day soldiers to return from Iraq suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
more...
John David Murphy's comment, January 25, 9:22 PM
Our brains are made up of chemicals that react and change over our life time. It no wonder after doing something traumatic or going through something changes the way we think and act.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Here's the Secret Silk Road Journal From the Laptop of Ross Ulbricht | WIRED

Here's the Secret Silk Road Journal From the Laptop of Ross Ulbricht | WIRED | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As the saga of the Silk Road has unfolded over the last four years, everyone has had an opinion about the unprecedented, billion-dollar online narcotics bazaar, from press to politicians to prosecutors. Even the pseudonymous mastermind of the site, the Dread Pirate Roberts, gave an interview and posted many thousands of words to the Silk…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

FBI: No bombs found on planes in Atlanta

FBI: No bombs found on planes in Atlanta | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Two passengers planes were escorted by F-16 fighter jets after a bomb threat. 
more...
Kyle May's comment, Today, 3:21 AM
It is quiet sad that simple Twitter posts can land a plane. I fully understand in today's age that we must take all threats as credible, especially in regards to our air safety. But this could be used as a tool to fear monger the publics of America. What are those people on the plane going to think when they fly now? Are they going to have a constant fear of what may be on the plane? It seems as this is a powerful tool for a Government/Group could use just to install more fear in us.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Geopolitical friends

Geopolitical friends | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The China-Pakistan Axis: Asia’s New Geopolitics. By Andrew Small. C. Hurst & Co; 319 pages; £30. Buy from Amazon.co.uk WHEN China sent swift condolences to...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Rob Duke from Inequality, Poverty, and Corruption: Effects and Solutions
Scoop.it!

Tension between urban and rural interests in development and beyond

Tension between urban and rural interests in development and beyond | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
By Tunç Soyer, Mayor of Seferihisar, Turkey Local governments: first line of defence against the most critical issues of humankind It is said that cities were first founded to meet people’s need fo...

Via Dr Lendy Spires, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

At Wasilla traffic stop, a flight, a fight and a mobile meth lab discovered

At Wasilla traffic stop, a flight, a fight and a mobile meth lab discovered | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska State Troopers say they discovered a mobile meth lab after a Wasilla man fled a traffic stop, then fought with the arresting officer.
Rob Duke's insight:

Better living through modern chemistry....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

How to “trick” people into caring about nature

How to “trick” people into caring about nature | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
M. Sanjayan talks to Salon about why conservation is in our own self-interest VIDEO
Rob Duke's insight:

...or just give the property rights to someone and let a market develop.  Countries that "give" the right to harvest elephant ivory, have a healthy elephant population, whereas countries that "protect" elephants are facing species extinction.  See the Coase Theorem:

http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1105&context=econ_fac

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

The Parents Always Wondered Why Their Dog Attacked Their Baby Sitter, The Truth Is Disturbing!!

SHOCKING: Parents discover a horrifying truth about their son’s babysitter!
more...
John David Murphy's comment, January 25, 9:18 PM
Sometimes animals are smarter than we give them credit for....... I like the idea of recording what happens in your home if someone you barely know is in it.
Corbin Sandgren's comment, Today, 1:35 AM
It was a good use of resources on the parents part to record the babysitter without her knowledge, but it is sad that it took so long for them to do so.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Is there a microchip implant in your future?

Is there a microchip implant in your future? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Microchip implants like the ones pet owners use to track their dogs and cats could become commonplace in humans in the next decade.
more...
Jessica Ramos's comment, January 25, 11:57 PM
With many people out there doing bad things such as hacking systems, and stealing credit card information, I really worry about things like this. Our own government is know for spying on us. Why should we give them tool to do so? I understand the good side to this, but the bad outweighs it. By a lot.
Kyle May's comment, Today, 3:09 AM
I agree there is a worry about security concerns but I don't see it as the bad outweights the good. We carry around a pocket GPS which *could* track out locations already, so how would this be much different? I don't know about anyone else, but my phone goes with me where-ever I am 24/7.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Marijuana growers in Mexico are switching to producing heroin poppies as pot prices drop in the U.S.

Marijuana growers in Mexico are switching to producing heroin poppies as pot prices drop in the U.S. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Drug farmers in Mexico switch to poppies as pot prices drop
more...
Kyle May's comment, Today, 3:14 AM
I can see why they are switching product, as legalization must be cutting into the market share that they've held for so long. Not to mention, the nature of Heroin leads for returning customers in greater quantities than Marijuana would ever. The buyer, once addicted, would feel the need to consume more Heroin to keep up the high. It's a revolving door for the Cartel, guaranteeing a returning customer.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

14-year-old girl films father’s sexual abuse with webcam

14-year-old girl films father’s sexual abuse with webcam | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police were unable to arrest the man until his daughter was able to produce video proof of her allegations
more...
Heather Wiinikka's comment, Today, 2:24 AM
See i do not think that is right because what if she would have never been able to get that evidence he would have gotten away with and been allowed to continue committed this horrible and could have developed more victims he just been arrested and investigated right away, because what if she never got that evidence and here father may have killed her or something all because no one would have done anything without the film. What a shame
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

“SNL” brilliantly tackles gentrification: “You’re acting like someone put gluten in your muffin”

“SNL” brilliantly tackles gentrification: “You’re acting like someone put gluten in your muffin” | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Three friends discuss the changes to the "hood" and what it means to hang with their "b**ches" VIDEO
more...
Jessica Ramos's comment, January 25, 11:57 PM
I am not from city were gentrification is the trend, but my boyfriend is. He was raised in Brooklyn, NY most of his life and after reading this together, he tried to explain the pros and cons of gentrification. With gentrification, many streets are cleaned up and are made to look more pleasant. Cost of living goes up. The bad thing is that many low class communities are targeted, due to less money needed to be invested. In most cases these neighborhoods are dominated by African Americans. With this happening, many people are forced out of their houses, and many cannot afford other places. It is good from a business perspective. You have many new business, which create new jobs opportunities, and better housing options. On the other side of the issue, you have many poor families that are forced out of there homes when the property owner decides to sell his land to the companies in charge of the gentrification process. To make ends meet, those same people might be forced into looking for other options to make ends meet such as robbery and such. How can we make gentrification a win/win situation for everyone involved?
Rescooped by Rob Duke from SocialAction2014
Scoop.it!

S.F. takes new direction on homeless camps with 1-stop aid center

S.F. takes new direction on homeless camps with 1-stop aid center | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The plan being spearheaded by the San Francisco mayor’s point man on homelessness is to create a one-stop homeless aid center in the heart of the Mission District that’s unlike any seen in America. Usually, when an encampment is broken up, aid workers offer shelter beds and other assistance as the angry campers start heading for the hills. Some take the offers, but many wind up doing what happened in December when San Jose officials busted up the huge Jungle encampment — about half spread out like melted Jell-O into new camps. Cleanup efforts are also thwarted when campers who do land in housing feel alienated or guilty because they abandoned their street community — and they go back to it. [...] are neighborhoods aching to get rid of homeless camps that have been burgeoning as tech-driven housing costs and gentrification shove them into new urban nooks and crannies. “I don’t know how it would ever be possible to help me, and I don’t really trust the system much, but hey — if they can get me and my friends into some kind of center like they’re talking about, we might give it a try,” Gember, 33, said as he tied off the entrance to his tent on San Bruno Avenue to go forage for food. Once in the center, the goal is to move people within three to 10 days to permanent rooms, rehabilitation centers, bus rides home or anything else that can lead to stable lives — and will stick. From creating thousands of counseling-enriched supportive housing units to the periodic Project Homeless Connect daylong, one-stop help fairs, the city has long gone the extra yard to help its street people. The always nettling challenge has been to deal with acutely troubled people who resent the constraints of shelters, distrust government and are afraid to leave their survival routines in the street — and legally can’t be forced to take help. Bending over backward to convince an indigent to take offered assistance seems counterintuitive, but studies show that moving a chronically homeless person out of the gutter actually saves cities money. According to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the United Way, someone living hard-core on the street costs more than $60,000 a year in police busts, emergency ambulance rides and the like, compared with about $20,000 in a government-funded supportive housing unit with counselors on-site to provide help. Several city agencies, including the Police Department and the Human Services Agency, will participate, along with nonprofits such as the Mission Neighborhood Resource Center and the Homeless Youth Alliance. The units will not just be lumped into huge complexes, but spread throughout other developments and smaller residence hotels away from traditionally troubled areas such as the Tenderloin — and they will come with added counseling, a crucial element for helping people stay inside. The new units are also to be partly funded by private donations, and the nonprofit HomeBase is conducting an exhaustive study to locate available spots for the city to lease. Street counselors have long said that if you can deal with whole communities instead of individuals, the whole process of getting to a stable life moves more quickly — and Dufty found this out firsthand in 2013 when the then-biggest encampment in the city, a sprawling mound of tents and trash at the Interstate 280 on-ramp alongside the Caltrain station, was broken up. All 30 campers were put up in a church auditorium for almost a week instead of just being offered housing vouchers or shelter beds, and within days all but five had been moved into permanent spots. A similar effort involving Pathways to Housing in Philadelphia has moved 450 severely mentally ill homeless people inside over six years, and the one-stop Connections Housing center in San Diego reduced homelessness downtown by more than half after it opened in 2013. “It’s actually a brilliant idea to bring in a displaced community of people,” Chris Simiriglia, Pathways’ executive director, said of San Francisco’s plan. Ray Bramson, homeless services manager for San Jose, likes the concept of one-stop help complexes such as the Navigation Center, although he warns it can be hard maintaining funding and that getting all the agencies to coordinate can be “like herding cats.”

Via Darcy Delaproser
more...
Megan Earle's comment, Today, 1:19 AM
This idea is fascinating to me. Before coming to college I would see homeless people on the street and criticize them for not going to a shelter and getting their lives together. I've since come to understand the unique subculture that is homelessness. This article helps to illustrate that these people do want help but without having to abandon loved ones, pets, and belongings.
Megan Earle's comment, Today, 1:21 AM
I think the approach this new shelter is taking is a big step in decreasing the homeless population by allowing them to go and bring everything they have and help get them on the path they want to be on.
Heather Wiinikka's comment, Today, 2:31 AM
I think this approach will decrease the homeless population and the fact it will help these people change there lives and help them be more of a successful life.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

Viewers respond to report about euthanasia in Belgium | PBS NewsHour

Viewers respond to report about euthanasia in Belgium | PBS NewsHour | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Hari Sreenivasan reads viewer comments about a recent NewsHour Weekend segment on Beligum's euthanasia law, the least restrictive law governing physician-assisted suicide in the world. Continue reading →
more...
Kaitlyn Evans's comment, Today, 2:02 AM
Euthanasia has stirred up much controversy just recently here in the states, with the legalization of doctor assisted suicide in Oregon. If you haven't watched the Netflix movie "How to Die in Oregon" I would recommend it. Although I am neither supporting or not supporting euthanasia at this point, I think it creates a lot of insight that we as viewers do not realize what some people go through on a day-to-day basis. Just recently a video went viral about a girl named Brittany Maynard who was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer and given x amount of days to live and decided to end her life peacefully and assisted. This created much debate as well. Brittany did not want to forget others and get worse to where it was painful to live everyday thus why she wanted to end her life peacefully. A UAF volleyball player's sister has the same type of brain cancer has been fighting and continues to fight for her life every day. Although bodies fight and react to cancer and treatment differently she chooses to continue to fight and beat cancer. It's an interesting scenario and really puts things into perspective. I also noticed in the news video someone mentioning those who are not mentally stable and wish to end their lives. I think it must be required that individuals prove they are mentally stable and aware of the decision they are going to make, and not make the decision to end their life because they want to due to unhappiness or whatever their condition may debilitate them from.
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

More homeless camps are appearing beyond downtown L.A.'s skid row

More homeless camps are appearing beyond downtown L.A.'s skid row | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Evicted four months ago from their Highland Park apartment, Louis Morales and his 18-year-old stepson, Arthur Valenzuela, live half-hidden by brush along the nearby Arroyo Seco riverbed.
more...
Riley Landeis's comment, January 25, 11:38 PM
something should be done in terms of creating homeless aid centers or more homeless shelters for that matter
Scooped by Rob Duke
Scoop.it!

'I Wanted Justice': Con Victim Turns Focus to Changing Rape Law

'I Wanted Justice': Con Victim Turns Focus to Changing Rape Law | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
After learning the man she loved was an international con man with a roster of ex-wives and children, New Jersey nurse Mischele Lewis did all she could—inclu...
more...
Corbin Sandgren's comment, Today, 1:50 AM
I think she has a good point because she was deceived and that is awful and i also see that sex assault by deception is a broad concept but under certain guidelines and situations like hers I think it is a good reason to change the law.