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Arrests over gang-rape of Swiss cyclist in India: police - Channel NewsAsia

Arrests over gang-rape of Swiss cyclist in India: police - Channel NewsAsia | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police in India said Sunday they had arrested a group of farmers in their twenties who had confessed to gang-raping a Swiss cyclist, the latest in a series of shocking sex crimes in the country.
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U. of Cincinnati Cop Indicted in Traffic Stop Killing, Video Released

U. of Cincinnati Cop Indicted in Traffic Stop Killing, Video Released | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing has been charged with murder in the killing of Sam DuBose, a black man, during a traffic stop two weeks ago. Prosecutors today announced the indictment and released video from Tensing’s body camera that shows him shooting DuBose in the head.
Rob Duke's insight:

I'll wait to chime in until you tell me what you think.  Can someone drive off and (maybe) drag an officer?

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How a Law Forcing Therapists to Report Patients for Viewing Child Pornography Could Backfire

How a Law Forcing Therapists to Report Patients for Viewing Child Pornography Could Backfire | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California's new rules are meant to protect children, but could lead to fewer pedophiles getting treatment before acting on their sexual impulses.
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'Well-mannered' boy, 15, allegedly lured girl, 8, to her death

Neighbors were left stunned after the youth, who had a good reputation in the community, was arrested in connection with the murder of Madyson Middleton in Santa Cruz, California.
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Buckle up

Buckle up | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
AS ANYONE who has ever set foot in Lebanon knows, the country’s drivers are a force to be feared. Motorists on the winding mountain roads think nothing of overtaking on a blind corner, at twice the speed limit. Keeping up-to-date with phone messages is a must, in the driver’s seat or otherwise. Seat belts? Often still covered in plastic wrapping.

Little wonder then that three months after a tough new law on driving came into force it is still the topic of conversation around Beirut, the traffic-clogged capital. As regulations go, this one is particularly stringent. Status-enhancing yet dangerous manoeuvres, such as driving a motorbike on one wheel, can entail a fine of up to 3m Lebanese pounds ($2,000) and even time behind bars. Dark-tinted windows are banned. Children under ten cannot be taken on motorcycles, thereby outlawing one of the region’s favourite modes of family transport. Learner drivers must take proper lessons rather than being taught by relatives, themselves home-schooled in the art of dodging pedestrians and potholes.
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Destination unknown

Destination unknown | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the past, cash increases in the minimum wage have been eroded by inflation. America’s federal minimum wage was last set, at $7.25, in 2009 and has not been changed since, so its value has faded over time. This means that in reality most countries have only ever temporarily increased the real minimum wage. If the recently proposed increases are maintained over time (as the electorate will surely expect), there could be long-term effects. Historically, economists have worried that high minimum wages boost the pay of those in work but at the expense of jobs. Take a burger bar, which is forced to pay its employees a higher legal minimum. To avoid making a loss, it might have to raise prices, putting off customers and reducing the need for staff. A permanent increase in the minimum wage could tip the balance in favour of burger-flipping machines, away from employees. Supermarkets have already replaced many cash-till operators with self-checkout machines. Displaced workers might find different jobs, though they might struggle to do so if they are low-skilled.
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Could We Give Criminals Corrective Brain Implants?

Could We Give Criminals Corrective Brain Implants? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
…It’s likely we will have cranial implants in two decades time that will be able to send signals to our brains that manipulate our behaviors. Those implants will be able to control out-of-control tempers and violent actions—and maybe even unsavory thoughts. This type of tech raises the obvious question: Instead of killing someone who has committed a terrible crime, should we instead alter their brain and the way it functions to make them a better person?
Rob Duke's insight:

Danger! Danger! Will Robinson.....

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Rudeness Spreads Like a Virus, Study Says

Rudeness Spreads Like a Virus, Study Says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Being uncivil at work is the rudeness equivalent of sneezing and hacking all over your colleagues.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, July 27, 10:30 AM

(From the article): Reading this research one could be compelled to ask: are we currently suffering from an rudeness epidemic, passing around the incivility bug like a classroom full of coughing and sneezing kids? While the root causes of bad workplace behavior are probably multiple, this study is enough to suggest that if your place of employment is the scene of lots of stress-inducing unkindness, you might want to consider a quarantine, consciously recognizing the ability of rudeness to spread and stepping away to regroup when you experience it so as to keep one incident from inciting another.

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Reading their minds

Reading their minds | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Brain waves Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. By Carl Safina. Henry Holt; 461 pages; $32. The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins. By Hal Whitehead and...
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Understanding Psychology Makes Economics Better

Understanding Psychology Makes Economics Better | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Understanding behavior isn't a way to justify government intervention.
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37 Million People Use Ashley Madison, The Website For Infidelity

37 Million People Use Ashley Madison, The Website For Infidelity | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’ve been working with NPR to discuss a number of the week. This time, it’s 37 million — the number of users of Ashley Madison, an online dating site for married people looking for an affair. Last…
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Mass Shootings in America | Stanford University Libraries

Mass Shootings in America | Stanford University Libraries | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Over the past few years, mass shootings in the United States have shaped national debates such as gun laws debates, law enforcement, school safety, and mental health debates. The Stanford Geospatial Center (SGC) contributes to these debates by providing additional research that can lead to a better understanding of mass shootings in the United States.


Via Jocelyn Stoller, Svend Aage Christensen
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Community Village World History
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Slavery to Mass Incarceration [VIDEO]

Slavery did not end in 1865


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7 ways living in Switzerland ruined America for me

The Swiss work hard, but they have a strong work-life balance. According to data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the average Swiss worker earned the equivalent of $91,574 a year in 2013, while the average American worker earned only $55,708. But the real story is that the average American had to work 219 hours more per year for this lesser salary.

Which brings us to lunch. In Switzerland, you don't arrive to a meeting late, but you also don't leave for your lunch break a second past noon. If it's summer, jumping into the lake to swim with the swans is an acceptable way to spend your lunch hour. If you eat a sandwich at your desk, people will scold you. I learned this the hard way.

"Ugh," said Tom, a Swiss art director I shared an office with at a Zurich ad agency. "It smells like someone ate their lunch in here." He threw open the windows and fanned the air.

"They did. I ate a sandwich here," I said.

Tom looked at me like I was crazy.

"No. Tomorrow you're having a proper lunch. With me," he said.

The next day, exactly at noon, we rode the funicular to a restaurant where we dined al fresco above Zurich. After lunch, we strolled down the hill. I felt guilty for being gone for an hour and a half. But no one had missed us at the office.

Lunchtime is sacred time in Switzerland. When I was on maternity leave, my husband came home for lunch to help me care for our daughter. This strengthened our marriage. Many families still reunite during weekdays over the lunch hour.

Weekends in Switzerland encourage leisure time, too. On Sundays, you can't even shop — most stores are closed. You are semi-required to hike in the Alps with your family. It's just what you do.

Rob Duke's insight:

She goes on to relate that she had:

Time and money;

An amazing unemployment system;

Lots of paid vacation and wasn't made to feel guilty about using it;

Never needed a car;

Great health care.

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In Rise Of U.S. Vape Shops, Owners Eye New Marijuana Market

Vape shops are looking into the medical marijuana market.
Rob Duke's insight:

Makes sense....

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Are landlords to blame for Britain’s housing crisis?

Are landlords to blame for Britain’s housing crisis? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
AS WE noted earlier this month, soaring house prices in Britain have put homeownership out of the reach of many young Britons. Although there are many causes behind...
Rob Duke's insight:

Fairbanks, are you listening?  You have a terrible jobs-housing mix.  Students and younger workers cannot afford $1600 mo. plus fuel in the winter.  It's not fair when a home can be purchased for less than the rent!

 

That should generate some comments....

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Why are the rights to “Happy Birthday” in dispute?

Why are the rights to “Happy Birthday” in dispute? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The evidence in Ms Nelson's birthday suit seems to suggest that the rights to the music expired either 70 or 95 years ago, while the words to "Happy Birthday to You" never belonged to the remarkable Hill sisters to begin with. Now the courts must decide once and for all.
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Why Cybersecurity Is So Difficult to Get Right

Why Cybersecurity Is So Difficult to Get Right | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It seems like hardly a week goes by without news of a data breach at yet another company. And it seems more and more common for breaches to break records in the amount of information stolen. If you’re a company trying to secure your data, where do you start? What should you think about? To answer these questions, I talked to Marc van Zadelhoff, VP of IBM Security, about the current state of cybersecurity and the Ponemon Institute’s 2015 study of cybersecurity around the world, which IBM sponsored.
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Inside Quebec's Paul Walker Memorial Ride | VICE | United States

In the small city of Saint-Eustache, a revved-up car rally was held in honor of the fallen Fast and Furious star, much to the chagrin of the local cops.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a metaphor for what you'll see everywhere in the world: yes, there's people breaking the law here, but most are not.  In fact, they say: We're not friends--we're family.  And, they mean it.  So how do you police this in an authentic way?

 

Is zero-tolerance an authentic way to police?  It certainly works: the Big Apple was once something akin to Gotham City, the fictional city that was based upon it, but something happened from about 1995 on--it cleaned up.  Is it coincidental that those we're the years when Bill Bratton was implementing zero-tollerance and Stop-n-frisk policing?  This isn't a one-off either, his policies had been equally effective at Massachusetts Transit Authority (1983-1986) and the New York City Transit Police (1990-1992).  Both of these are striking because the transit system clean up was considered to be an impossible job, and this clean up happened many years before the crime drop that is often credited with the clean up of New York.  Look at other big cities like Chicago and Philadelphia that did not enjoy similar drops in crime.

 

So, this success for now-unpopular policy is a major hurdle for community policing and restorative justice.  

 

How do we resolve this problem?

 

I'd argue that there's a balance to be achieved using something like the Coalignment theory that adopts a "normal' restorative approach with community policing; and, elevates policing to something similar to zero-tolerance during times when gang shootings have occurred.

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Social Capital and Pierre Bourdieu: A Digest

Social Capital and Pierre Bourdieu: A Digest | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Pierre Bourdieu is a sociologist who’s interest focused on social class and stratification along with inequality. His perspectives evolved through trying to develop a cultural anthropology of social reproduction. In the 1960s he described the [...]

Via Dr Derek Jones
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Dr Derek Jones's curator insight, July 27, 4:25 AM

Bourdieu is relevant to discussion of health inequality because of his concern with social class. His idea of cultural capital also fits with the idea that social exclusion is not just about economic status. As someone who has come to academia from a non-traditional background it also makes sense to me in terms of why I always feel like a bit of an outsider.

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RIVERSIDE: Should more police cars be marked?

RIVERSIDE: Should more police cars be marked? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Now, Riverside Councilman Mike Soubirous is asking whether repainting some of the city’s unmarked cars would make the police force more visible and help deter crime, a notion some law enforcement officials say has been debunked by their experiences and numerous studies.
Soubirous, a retired California Highway Patrol officer, is questioning why the Riverside Police Department has more unmarked vehicles than marked ones and how the unmarked cars are used. He has asked the council’s public safety committee to discuss repainting some of the unmarked cars black and white.
Rob Duke's insight:

Micromanager in chief.

 

RPD has had a great reputation for years.  When I started in '85, they were driving completely white cars with just the city seal on the doors.

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Police in Sweden question and test Snoop Dogg for suspected drug use after concert

Police in Sweden question and test Snoop Dogg for suspected drug use after concert | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Swedish police say they briefly held U.S. rapper Snoop Dogg on suspicion of drug use after he performed a concert near Stockholm.

National police spokesman Fredrik Wallen says a police patrol in the city of Uppsala, north of the capital, stopped a car in which Snoop Dog was a passenger on Saturday evening after the concert. Police questioned him at a local police station and tested him for suspected drug use.
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‪[NIS Hacking Scandal] NIS Agent's Suicide Note, "My Excessive Desire to Do the Work Well..."

‪[NIS Hacking Scandal] NIS Agent's Suicide Note, "My Excessive Desire to Do the Work Well..." | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Im was an NIS agent and also a cyber security expert who had overseen tasks related to the hacking program. A police official said, "As the controversy surrounding the hacking program which the NIS bought from an Italian spyware firm, Hacking Team, intensified, it appears Im was mentally burdened and made an extreme decision."
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The Technology Behind Bitcoin Could Replace Lawyers, Too | HP

The Technology Behind Bitcoin Could Replace Lawyers, Too | HP | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Smart contracts promise to relieve businesses of the costs and lag-time of corporate legal work. This software-based change could affect services firms everywhere.  


Via jean lievens
Rob Duke's insight:

Technology continues to flatten the legal system and provide room in the shadow of the law for people to discover more efficient ad hoc methods of managing resources.  See the work of Elinor Ostrom and common pool resources for the theory base of why this works.

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The Learned Attitude That Makes Children More Anxious and Violent

The Learned Attitude That Makes Children More Anxious and Violent | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Comparison of children in 12 countries reveals the most aggressive, and why.

 

Children who expect others to be aggressive are more aggressive themselves, new international research concludes.

Professor Kenneth A. Dodge, who led the study, said:

“When a child infers that he or she is being threatened by someone else and makes an attribution that the other person is acting with hostile intent, then that child is likely to react with aggression.

This study shows that this pattern is universal in every one of the 12 cultural groups studied worldwide.”

The research compared 1,299 children in the US, Italy, Jordan, Kenya Thailand, China — 12 countries in all.

Children were given scenarios to read involving common situations that could be interpreted ambiguously.

- See more at: http://www.spring.org.uk/2015/07/the-learned-attitude-that-makes-children-more-anxious-and-violent.php#sthash.sOs6dCfy.dpuf


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Financial workers feel massively under pressure to compromise ethical ... - City A.M.

Financial workers feel massively under pressure to compromise ethical ... - City A.M. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A third of those in the finance sector feel under pressure from their employers to compromise their ethics, a  report by the Chartered Institute of Management

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