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The great experiment

The great experiment | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
UNTIL recently it seemed that nothing would disturb the international consensus that the best way to deal with narcotic and psychotropic drugs is to ban them....
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Brandon Barnes's comment, February 23, 2013 4:23 AM
I honestly think it is ok for the government to make marijuana legal but they will have to draw a line somewhere. Certain types of drugs are far to dangerous to the user and many to the people around the user. Weed is a relatively harmless drug when compared to the harder drugs like cocaine and ecstasy. This would cut down on the prison population if cannibus was made legal, it would cause somewhat less work for law enforcement but of course their would be the work of making sure people aren't driving under the influence of the aformentioned newly legal drug. Many factors would have to be well thought out but the tax payer would not have to pay for so many people to go through the system and prison for the relatively victimless use of cannibus, especially if it were legal (no drug dealer needed, so just buying it at a store or pharmacy instead). Then of course the state and federal government could make a killing on taxing the newly legal drug. And then there's the whole problem that pot heads really don't often make plans to quit. It is like prohibition, if alcohol is illegal look at all the crime that surrounds the sale of it, including violent crime. But the line would have to be drawn to avoid a slippery slope of soon allowing cocaine and ecstasy or other drugs to be legalized. It would have to be a firm stand on the dangerousness of those harder drugs deems them to be forever illegal.
Mike Dallaire's comment, February 23, 2013 6:29 AM
Brandon, I don't think I could agree more with just about everything you said. Though I do believe that weed is a harmless drug and should be legalized I'm not sure it should be limited to being sold simply in pharmacy's or stores that can be taxed. Only because I think you'd still have far too many people selling "under the table" if you will to avoid the taxes and seemingly make pure profit. Other then that, I feel what an individual does with themselves is entirely up to them as long as they're not harming others. Of course, some sort of weed breathalyzer would need to be developed (and i've read that such a device is already being developed) to prevent driving while high. Finally, while I also agree that harder drugs that cause more damage, to users as well as those around them, should remain illegal, a better system needs to be put in place to prevent their destructive use. Unfortunately, that's a nearly impossible task and as we well know the more you regulate something the more criminal it becomes and the more problems it causes. One has to wonder if legalizing those as well might lift the taboo that surrounds them thus driving down their use?
Kassandr Liesenfeld's comment, February 26, 2013 10:10 PM
one good argument for legalizing marijuana is that alcohol is legal even though it is more destructive. People get aggressive, pass out etc. On the other hand, legalizing one drug could open the door to harder drugs. Legalizing marijuana could be the start of breaking the taboo about other drugs. It has to be considered that marijuana is often used by young people as a start to harder and more serious drugs.

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Baltimore Photographer Devin Allen Captures Uprising In Touching TIME Cover Photo

Baltimore Photographer Devin Allen Captures Uprising In Touching TIME Cover Photo | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An amateur photographer from Baltimore is being celebrated for his photos taken during the recent demonstrations in the name of Freddie Gray. His images are so touching, in fact, that the 26-year-o...
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Finland’s Sámi request UN's help in securing their rights

Finland’s Sámi request UN's help in securing their rights | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Describing “extreme disappointment” that the 1989 convention has still not been signed, Sanila-Aikio said: “The situation does not look any more promising now after the elections, as the loudest opponents to the ILO agreement are the ones who have taken power.”

No time to vote
This spring Finland’s Justice Minister Anna-Maja Henriksson said she regretted that parliament did not have time to vote on ratifying the convention in the final weeks before the election.
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The Development of Therapeutic Jurisprudence: from Theory to Practice by David B. Wexler :: SSRN

The Development of Therapeutic Jurisprudence: from Theory to Practice by David B. Wexler :: SSRN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This Essay formed the basis of a lecture given in October 1997 at the University of Virginia Law School, which was featuring a 25 year retrospective in developm
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Baltimore ‘looting’ tweets show importance of quick and easy image checks — Medium

Baltimore ‘looting’ tweets show importance of quick and easy image checks — Medium | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
We could speculate all day on the motivations of the people who posted these tweets, from the sinister to the silly. One thing for certain is that they were getting dozens of favourites and retweets, and there was no shortage of people taking them seriously.

Some notified law enforcement officials…
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The problem with self-report studies, too....

The researchers say: "why would people lie about committing crimes?"  Well, for one thing, a deviant subculture may glorify the activity.  Veblen showed us that people like to "display scalps on their belts" and criminal activity seems to be one of those prestige items easy to display.

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The lessons of Baltimore

The lessons of Baltimore | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE last time Baltimore rioted in the way it did last night was in 1968, after the murder of Martin Luther King. In the neighbourhoods of West Baltimore, where the...
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John Oulton's comment, May 2, 3:58 PM
I think that Baltimore has an underground economy. The city is thriving with criminals and the murder rate is high. The inner city is hard to come by because the lack of resources have the people find new resources like drugs as I theorize. It takes a lot of guts to kill, but I dont think that much if that person is under the influence of something or has anger over something with someone.
Rob Duke's comment, May 2, 11:25 PM
John: yes, there's a great amount of structural and economic change needed to truly change Baltimore.
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The feminisation of poverty and the myth of the 'welfare queen'

Governments are constructing social policy based on misrepresentations and stereotypes about poor people and welfare claimants, rather than by reference to the structural inequalities that affect everyone, argues Kate Donald. The ‘feminisation of poverty’ is now an undeniable reality. Worldwide, ...


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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Police brutality, LORD God we ask for forgiveness of anything that is hendering your justice from taking place as we need an welcome in your JUSTICE NOW!
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NYPD Cannibal Cop Found Guilty

Fight Censorship on YouTube** NYC -- New York police officer Gilberto Valle conspired to kidnap women, who prosecutors argued he planned to rape, torture, ...

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A Brief Guide to Gender in India - GRANTA

A Brief Guide to Gender in India - GRANTA | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

‘Please be creative. This is only the beginning.’


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Executing justice

Executing justice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ON APRIL 29th Indonesia executed eight people convicted of drug trafficking. Despite concerns over legal failings and the mental health of one prisoner, four...
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The Untold Story of Silk Road | WIRED

The Untold Story of Silk Road | WIRED | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How a 29-year-old idealist built a global drug bazaar and became a murderous kingpin.
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The regulated West

The regulated West | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IN THE RV parks, along interstates and at the bottom of canyons in the desert West a distinctive species of American can be found. Lexington recently joined them,...
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Paying for poverty: Contracting out probation

Paying for poverty: Contracting out probation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
VERA CHEEKS failed to halt at a ‘Stop’ sign in Georgia last year. Too poor to pay the ticket’s $135 fine, she was put on probation until she earned enough to cover the charge. But this came at a cost: her case was handled by a private firm, called Red Hills Community Probation, which charged an extra $132 for the privilege. The firm also told Ms Cheeks that she had to pay $50 immediately in order to avoid being sent to jail. Her fiancé ultimately rescued her with money from pawning her engagement ring and his gardening equipment.
Rob Duke's insight:

You could never do this to your neighbor.  Terrible consequences of a vertical system and contracting out.

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Teacher Brady Olson Who Tackled Shooter Comforted Gunman

Teacher Brady Olson Who Tackled Shooter Comforted Gunman | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Washington state high school teacher who tackled an armed student who fired two shots in the air Monday morning said Tuesday that he consoled the 16-year...
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Maddie Davis's comment, April 30, 6:19 PM
I think it’s crazy how many school shootings there are nowadays. I thought this article was really interesting because I actually know this school and it’s really close to home, so when it happened, I heard about it pretty quickly. Thank god Brady Olson was there and was able to stop the student.
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Brian Cashman: Yankees won't pay Alex Rodriguez's bonus for 660th home run

Brian Cashman: Yankees won't pay Alex Rodriguez's bonus for 660th home run | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This likely means that a grievance will be filed in the next two weeks, which likely will head to an independent arbitrator this winter.
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Brain Bias: How difficult is it to reprogram our brains?

Free Audio Book ⇒ http://bit.ly/AudibleSED ⇐ (I really do love the Commander's book!) Tweet ⇒ http://bit.ly/BackwardsBike ⇐ Post to FB⇒ http://bit.ly/Backwar...
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This video illustrates how difficult it is to reprogram our biases.  We know what we know and the only way to convince someone else is to switch places with them for enough time that they can have that "moment" when the algorithm "sticks".

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Karachi’s wild child

Karachi’s wild child | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Here in the midst of anarchic, dysfunctional, crammed, crazy, noisy Karachi was a woman who was even more anarchic, crazy, noisy and in-your-face. She was at the heart of every disturbance, from supporting rank outsiders in the local elections to organising flash protests on social media, and spiced up every organisation she belonged to, which was any outfit committed to challenging discrimination or injustice.
Rob Duke's insight:

Oh Pakistan....

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What the cops say

What the cops say | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Yet few also doubt that most police officers are decent people who “risk their own safety for ours every single day,” as President Barack Obama put it recently. According to one poll, three quarters of people, including a majority of African Americans, say that they approve of the job being done by their local police department. Police officers in general seem to be thought of as decent people doing good work—and yet policing, as a practice, is widely distrusted. What explains this contradiction?
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Revolutionary History

Revolutionary History | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“Revolutions Without Borders” ends on a wistful note. The French Directoire, which ruled from 1795 until it came increasingly under the sway of Napoleon Bonaparte, dispensed with the revolution’s universal character. Its armies in parts of Belgium, Germany, Italy and Switzerland became just another occupying force. In America the counter-revolutionaries ensured that the country was hostile to figures like Paine. As the walls went up again, Ms Polasky’s wandering revolutionaries were left with nowhere to call home.
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Full Article: Human rights, public health and medicinal cannabis use

Full Article: Human rights, public health and medicinal cannabis use | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

This paper explores the interplay between the human rights and drug control frameworks and critiques case law on medicinal cannabis use to demonstrate that a bona fide human rights perspective allows for a broader conception of ‘health’. This broad conception, encompassing both medicalised and social constructionist definitions, can inform public health policies relating to medicinal cannabis use. The paper also demonstrates how a human rights lens can alleviate a core tension between the State and the individual within the drug policy field. The leading medicinal cannabis case in the UK highlights the judiciary’s failure to engage with an individual’s human right to health as they adopt an arbitrary, externalist view, focussing on the legality of cannabis to the exclusion of other concerns. Drawing on some international comparisons, the paper considers how a human rights perspective can lead to an approach to medicinal cannabis use which facilitates a holistic understanding of public health.


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Gut Feelings--the "Second Brain" in Our Gastrointestinal Systems [Excerpt]

Gut Feelings--the "Second Brain" in Our Gastrointestinal Systems [Excerpt] | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

There is a superhighway between the brain and GI system that holds great sway over humans


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Jim Manske's curator insight, May 1, 1:44 PM
I had a gut feeling to share this with you....interdependence is multidirectional?
John Oulton's comment, May 2, 5:13 PM
Police officers and other law enforcement careers have a good grasp of this, as in a "second brain" such as the CNS. Their discretion will be handy.
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Revenge porn hacker: 'Scary how quickly I would drop my morals for so little'

Revenge porn hacker: 'Scary how quickly I would drop my morals for so little' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What was it like the first time you hacked into a woman's Facebook or Twitter account or inbox?
It doesn't feel real, when I'm in my room, lights off, door locked, drinking ... you don't feel the consequences. And then I'd go straight out and party with friends and try not to think about it. If I had to look somebody in the face to do that, it'd be a different story.
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Two nations

Two nations | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Our interactive chart today imagines that black and white America were separate countries and compares them with the rest of the world. Black America is a violent place, and ruthlessly policed. Its citizens are more likely to be murdered than people in Namibia and more likely to be locked up than any group, anywhere.
 
White Americans are far less likely to be locked up than their black compatriots, but far more likely to be behind bars than the citizens of nearly all other countries. They are seldom murdered, however: at 2.5 per 100,000 the white American homicide rate is barely worse than Norway’s 2.2.
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Of recyclers and rag men

Of recyclers and rag men | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
AFTER Argentina’s economy crashed in 2001, the ranks of informal workers grew along with those of the unemployed. In Buenos Aires, the capital, destitute citizens...
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New campaign addresses public health aspects of Alaska's legal pot

New campaign addresses public health aspects of Alaska's legal pot | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Months after Alaska voters approved marijuana legalization, the Alaska Department of Health and Social Service launched its ad campaign geared toward providing facts on the health effects of marijuana consumption.
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Houston, the City with (Almost) No Limits or Formal Zoning

Houston, the City with (Almost) No Limits or Formal Zoning | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As the only major U.S. city without formal zoning, Houston has a reputation as a freewheeling place where anything goes. But in truth, a complex patchwork of public and private regulation has evolved to impose order.

In Houston, the lone major city in the United States that never has enacted zoning, the actual landscape hardly matches a dire hypothetical scenario. “If you drive around Houston after you’ve been to other major cities, you’ll find that, in many ways, we look very similar,” says Patrick Walsh, the city’s planning director. “We have commercial corridors with a lot of activity and a mix of uses; residential neighborhoods that are distinct and fairly uniform.”


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