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Pakistan mob burns man accused of desecrating Koran alive

Pakistan mob burns man accused of desecrating Koran alive | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
HYDERABAD, Pakistan (Reuters) - A mob broke into a Pakistani police station and burnt a man accused of desecrating the Koran alive, police said Saturday, in the latest violence focusing attention on the (RT @BreakingNews: Police: A mob broke into ...
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Feds charge mining company and executives with criminal pollution in Southwest Alaska

Feds charge mining company and executives with criminal pollution in Southwest Alaska | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Australian-led mining company owned by an offshore corporation and five of its top officials and employees conspired to dump waste from a platinum mine into a Southwest Alaska salmon river, a federal indictment handed up Tuesday alleges.
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Forensic Accident Reconstructions

I saw this and just had to post it. I know it's not as interesting as the real thing, but I just think it's cool enough to post.

Via Tioni Kolo Toolkit
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 19, 6:00 PM
Graphics like these really put accidents into perspective and must help authorities in figuring out what happened at an accident. Understanding how cars react the way they do at different speeds is very interesting.
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Turning them around

Turning them around | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
WREATHS of poppies were laid to commemorate Britain’s war dead on Remembrance Day. But days before, police arrested four men suspected of planning a terrorist...
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Is ‘Illegal Pete’s’ an offensive name for a restaurant chain? Was it always?

Is ‘Illegal Pete’s’ an offensive name for a restaurant chain? Was it always? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The national debate over the use of the term “illegal immigrant” has fixed on an unlikely lightning rod: the liberal-minded, pro-immigrant owner of a Mexican restaurant chain in Colorado.


Via Tim Grant
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Tim Grant's curator insight, November 18, 8:16 AM

An interesting article via Krzysz Kredens on the impact of language change and offensiveness.

Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 18, 8:22 PM
I think that these days people have become extremely sensitive about certain words and certain things in general. I don't really see the issue with this restaurant's name. The name means something to this restaurant owner and it has for a very long time. He doesn't mean it to be a racial or slur, or for it to be demeaning. In my opinion people need to stop thinking that everything is about them, because it really isn't. This restaurant name has nothing to do with illegal immigrants, yet they are the ones who are offended. It amazes me. There was a situation one time while I was working, where a customer told my boss she was going to have me deported back to Asia. It didn't hurt my feelings whatsoever, in fact I laughed at her stupidity and ignorance. Life is too short, to let little things like that upset you. You know where you are from, and whether or not you are an immigrant. I don't think these people should let these words hurt them, let alone a restaurant name.
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Wine & Bottles: A metaphor & a methodology for mainstreaming TJ, by David Wexler

Wine & Bottles:  A metaphor & a methodology for mainstreaming TJ,  by David Wexler | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In this new Blog, we hope to include very short pieces relating to the “mainstreaming” of therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) — that is, the use of TJ principles, practices, and techniques in the “ordin...
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Land, Co-ops, Compost: A Local Food Economy Emerges in Boston’s Poorest Neighborhoods

Land, Co-ops, Compost: A Local Food Economy Emerges in Boston’s Poorest Neighborhoods | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
From kitchens that buy and sell locally grown food, to a waste co-op that will return compost to the land, new enterprises are building an integrated food network. It’s about local people keeping the wealth of their land at home.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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6 Ways Religion Does More Bad Than Good

6 Ways Religion Does More Bad Than Good | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What if harming society is part of religion’s survival strategy?
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's a good article to practice applying ethical and logic standards....1, 2, and 6; as well as, 5 and 3 seem to be re-wrapping the same arguments in order to stretch the article.  Many of these arguments are supported with logical fallacies so be careful in your analysis.  For instance, saying that the least religious societies are the most "peaceful, prosperous and equitable", if true, is probably a spurious relationship.  Weber's argument was that Protestantism influenced the development of capitalism; and, the Catholic Church's prohibition on levantism, cousin inter-marriage and concubines all reduced the tendency to organize into clans/tribes and was the seed for individual rights long before the Enlightenment.

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Former coal boss indicted over 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster

Former coal boss indicted over 2010 Upper Big Branch Mine disaster | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
(Reuters) – Donald Blankenship, a former chief executive of Massey Energy Co, was indicted on Thursday on charges that he violated federal mine safety laws prior to the April 2010 explosion at the company’s Upper Big Branch Mine in West Virginia,...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Geography Education
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Power of Place: Boundaries and Borderlands

Power of Place: Boundaries and Borderlands | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

"This program, Boundaries and Borderlands, introduces the case study approach of the course. Here we examine the borderland region between the regions of North America and Latin America. The first case study, Twin Cities, Divided Lives, follows the story of Concha Martinez as she crosses between the U.S. and Mexico in order to make a life for herself and her children.  The second case study, Operation Hold the Line, follows up the question of cross-border migration raised in the first program. It takes a look at how U.S. border policy is shaping the lives of not only the people living in this borderland region, but in more distant U.S. and Mexican locations as well."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 3:29 PM

This is a not a new resource and I know that many of you are familiar with it, but this is worth repeating for those not familiar with the Annenberg Media's "Power of Place" video series.  With 26 videos (roughly 30 minutes each) that are regionally organized, this be a great resource for geography teachers that need either a regional of thematic case-study video clip.     


Tagsmigrationregions video, APHG.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 17, 3:16 AM

Open borders:  An American Exceptionalism asset worth preserving?

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How 18 inmates at California’s notorious San Quentin prison learn to code

How 18 inmates at California’s notorious San Quentin prison learn to code | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Forget making license plates: Select group now taught HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

Via dMaculate
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 16, 5:57 PM
I am happy that programs like these exist, but at the same time annoyed. We can provide education to inmates, but at the same time we are limiting the public who has not committed crimes from being able to afford these same types of classes. It would be interesting to see the outcome and recidivism rate of these 18 individuals taking the course. Hopefully they do well, so the program can continue. Also the companies that have been given the contracts hold up to their end of the bargain and put these people in the work force, not just one of those we will get you a “job’” which turns out to be a temp job and they are let go soon after. Also interesting that they said the inmates can work from the prison once they understand it, so then who is profiting from this labor? Is it a way to avoid outsourcing to india or other locations? I cannot hate on those trying to get an education, its just more needs to be done with public education in the first place.
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Why prisoners join gangs

Why prisoners join gangs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE inmates of America’s overcrowded prisons can be a fearsome bunch, from murderers covered in tattoos to drug dealers wielding homemade knives. They readily beat...
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 16, 6:07 PM
I think the last sentence in the article really explains what needs to be done “Gangs are a logical response to prison conditions; to reduce them, the authorities must improve the state of incarceration.” When a person is put in for life in prison, you cannot blame them for going and joining in with peers who share the same ideas and deviant behavior. It really does come down to survival mode when it is such a large population of people being incarcerated. I don't think someone can afford to be the odd man out, and its not like when your on the outside and you can migrate away from the situation if needed. You are forced to be in close contact with these different groups and you will need someone to watch your back. I think its just something part of the prison culture and its not going to go away anytime soon, if we just keep incarceration these groups will grow, and learn from each other.
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New FBI definition increases Alaska's already high rape rate

New FBI definition increases Alaska's already high rape rate | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The FBI has released its 2013 crime statistics, and while a revised definition of rape has increased the rape rate in Alaska and nationwide, an official said people should not assume the increase reflects an actual increase of violence.
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Thomas Piketty’s “Capital”, summarised in four paragraphs

Thomas Piketty’s “Capital”, summarised in four paragraphs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IT IS the economics book taking the world by storm. "Capital in the Twenty-First Century", written by the French economist Thomas Piketty, was published in French...
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Hands-on lessons in accident investigation

Hands-on lessons in accident investigation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
CQUNIVERSITY Bachelor of Accident Forensics students are receiving hands-on training thanks to the university’s new purpose-built crash lab.

Via Vonny~, Tioni Kolo Toolkit
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Criminal Justice News: U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitive’s Skull Found by Family Dog

Criminal Justice News: U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitive’s Skull Found by Family Dog | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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The Other Side of Suicide.

The Other Side of Suicide. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
That kind of resiliency took another character trait that many people assume victims of suicide lack---courage. She weathered the brutal blows of mental illness
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Criminal Justice in America
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How the way we walk can increase risk of being mugged

How the way we walk can increase risk of being mugged | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The way we move can influence the likelihood of an attack by a stranger. The good news, though, is that altering it can reduce the chances of being targeted.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Randy L. Dixon Rivera's curator insight, November 18, 7:24 PM

The answer to being mugged is concealed carry (CCP) BE SURE to notify 911 (inform them you feared for your life) and request an ambulance/paramedics for the mugger.  Survival is a mugger's chalkline not yours & not  EXPERT enough to just wound an attacker. #Litigation matters & Cops know this.

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How young is too young?

How young is too young? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IN 1275 an English judge condemned a man for “ravishing” a girl aged under 12, the legal minimum for marriage at the time. Three centuries later the rape of a...
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Use and Abuse of the “Natural Capital” Concept

Use and Abuse of the “Natural Capital” Concept | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Big problems certainly arise when we consider natural capital as expressible as a sum of money (financial capital), and then take money in the bank growing at the interest rate as the standard by which to judge whether the value of natural capital is growing fast enough, and then, following the rules of present value maximization, liquidate populations growing slower than the interest rate and replace them with faster growing ones. This is not how the ecosystem works. Money is fungible, natural stocks are not; money has no physical dimension, natural populations do. Exchanges of matter and energy among parts of the ecosystem have an objective ecological basis. They are not governed by prices based on subjective human preferences in the market.

Via Willy De Backer
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, November 16, 3:20 AM

Excellent must-read article by Herman Daly, the father of ecological economics, on the monetary valuation of 'natural capital'

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Three Ways Courts Screw the Innocent Into Pleading Guilty - The Intercept

Three Ways Courts Screw the Innocent Into Pleading Guilty - The Intercept | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
You should go read Jed A. Rakoff’s essay in The New York Review of Books, in which the senior federal district judge tries to explain why innocent people so often plead guilty. But even if you have better things to do this weekend than digest Rakoff’s thorough, convincing, 4,400-word essay, it’s still worth considering why>>

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Why the Violence in Mexico is Getting Worse

"Mass killings have become increasingly common across Mexico due to the country's ongoing war on drugs. Cartels and gangs, often working with help from local police, are murdering innocent victims by the dozens and leaving them in unmarked graves. So just how bad is the violence in Mexico, and what is the Mexican President doing to stop it?"


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 4, 12:08 PM

Read the transcript of the video here, that link is also a nice resource for to do some additional research on the topic.


Tags: Mexico, narcotics.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 14, 2:45 PM

The war on drugs has destroyed thousands of lives in Mexico.  Despite efforts from government officials to dismantle the drug system in the country, it seems as if their efforts are going nowhere. With the dismantling of large drug gangs and the capturing of 30 out of 37 most wanted drug lordes in Mexico, it gives the illusion that government officials finally has a control over this ordeal. Rather, it has destroyed large drug groups and created smaller ones. With the new president in office, I don't think all of his efforts to wage the war on drugs is beneficial. How is allowing drug lordes to keep their weapon beneficial to stopping the war on drugs in Mexico?

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Massachusetts school installs country's first shooter-detection system

Massachusetts school installs country's first shooter-detection system | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
One district in Massachusetts this week unveiled the country's first installation of a shooter-detection system inside a U.S. school.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 18, 8:30 PM
It's unfortunate that we have had to come to something like this. But, at the same time it's a good thing to have in schools especially in today's world. I think that this type of shooter detection system can help to put parents, students, and teachers at ease. It seems like it is a beneficial tool, that can help to diffuse a shooter situation quickly. I hope to see this type of technology in more schools over the years, so that we can improve the safety measures for our students in the schools. I think that the way this system has been designed is cool. Hopefully the alert that is automatically sent can help law enforcement to react faster than they have been able to. Over the years I'm sure they will improve this system, and it will become even better.
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California Legalized Selling Food Made At Home And Created Over A Thousand Local Businesses

California Legalized Selling Food Made At Home And Created Over A Thousand Local Businesses | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A government official appears at a man’s door. The man has been breaking the law: He has sold bread baked at home. This isn’t a page from Kafka—it happened to Mark Stambler in Los Angeles.
Rob Duke's insight:

What do you think--is it ridiculous to have to have a law that allows one to make food at home?

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Michael Shepherd's curator insight, November 15, 3:01 PM

For once a step in the right direction.

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 16, 6:31 PM
Its unnecessary to attack a local food maker if no complaints where made to the health department and no cases of food poising. Its a scary thought what the FDA is able to get away with approving to put in food that are available for consumption in the U.S. I can see the law is there to prevent food poising, but at the same time if someone chooses to buy food from a person, they also choose to accept responsibility if it messes up their gastro track, let that be between seller and buyer, a third party should not be involved at such a low level. The caps on what you can make as far as profit is not great, although I compared the california to Michigan cottage law, and at least california has a higher cap. Michigan's law prevents you from making a living off it, and instead just a hobby. This law also goes against people who may want to offer healthier food options for people. You can sell bake goods, but not soy based products like Tempeh which is a meat alternative. I just think it is unnecessary for the health department to be so involved, at a small level.
Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 18, 8:43 PM
I don't see the problem with at home baking at then selling your product. What about people at small fairs or holiday bazaars? I doubt they have to go through a bunch of hoops to sell their baked goods. If so, I doubt many people would do it. I understand why the health department would want to get involved, because of certain codes and procedures. But, once they saw nothing was wrong they should have continued to let the man sell his bread. I'm glad that in the end there was a positive outcome, and these people are allowed to sell baked goods from their home.
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How to lie with indices

How to lie with indices | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“CROOKS already know these tricks. Honest men must learn them in self-defence,” wrote Darrell Huff in 1954 in “How to Lie With Statistics”, a guide to...
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