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Violent crime rate more than doubled in the four years after the 2001 ...

Violent crime rate more than doubled in the four years after the 2001 ... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There has been justifiable concern about causes of crime such as poverty and unemployment, but little admission that some individuals prefer theft to work and that deterrence must be taken seriously. Victims of aggression ...
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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Jury finds ex-San Francisco bank executive guilty of fraud

Jury finds ex-San Francisco bank executive guilty of fraud | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag said Thursday a federal jury in Oakland found 66-year-old Ebrahim Shabudin guilty of conspiring with others within the bank to falsify key bank records as part of a scheme to conceal millions of dollars in losses and falsely inflate the bank's financial statements. United Commercial Bank received $298 million from the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP, in 2008 during the height of the nation's financial crisis.
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15 of the Most Absurd Police Department Names - Uniform Stories

15 of the Most Absurd Police Department Names - Uniform Stories | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I'm sure these police departments are tired of all the jokes, but for the rest of us...
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, Today, 5:02 AM
I think, it’s kind of funny and silly police agencies with this kinds of names; however, it shows that they love their city and they are ready to serve. Coincidence sometimes happens, and such names looks silly but cool. I think North Pole police should be there as well.
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Germanwings plane crash: Co-pilot 'wanted to destroy plane'

Germanwings plane crash: Co-pilot 'wanted to destroy plane' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The co-pilot of the Germanwings flight, named as Andreas Lubitz, intentionally started the plane's descent before it crashed into the French Alps, officials say.
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Chomsky: Myth of American Success Goes Hand in Hand With Racial Oppression / Sputnik International

Chomsky: Myth of American Success Goes Hand in Hand With Racial Oppression / Sputnik International | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
American economic prosperity is inextricably linked to its history of slavery and racial oppression, and fears that black people will take revenge are 'deeply rooted in American culture,' says academic, author, and dissident Noam Chomsky in a...

Via jean lievens
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Investigation and Forensic Science Case Study: Human Remains Found In Wood Stove

Investigation and Forensic Science Case Study: Human Remains Found In Wood Stove | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police were tipped of by a witness who saw Owens dumping bags of items into a dumpster in Candler, which is just south of the couple's home town of Leicester. Police searched the dumpster and found items belonging to Mrs. Codd, and identified Owens as the person who dumped them there.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a great example of detectives mining tips to find clues to a difficult case.  Then, forensic techs combing several scenes for evidence, which then is used to confront the suspect(s) with inconsistencies in their original statements.  Leading to charges.

 

Strange that the crime scene burned down shortly thereafter.  Things to make you go hmmm.

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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, March 26, 5:07 PM
Yeah. I had a hmmm reaction to. It is nice to see the two groups working so closely together in this case.
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Wealth Inequality: a rebuttal to Thomas Piketty's "Capital": Rate on return of wealth may not exceed economic growth (3 reasons)

Wealth Inequality: a rebuttal to Thomas Piketty's "Capital": Rate on return of wealth may not exceed economic growth (3 reasons) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mr Rognlie mounts three main criticisms of these arguments. First, he argues that the rate of return from capital probably declines over the long run, rather than remaining high as Mr Piketty suggests, due to the law of diminishing marginal returns. Modern forms of capital, such as software, depreciate faster in value than equipment did in the past: a giant metal press might have a working life of decades while a new piece of database-management software will be obsolete in a few years at most. This means that although gross returns from wealth are rising, they may not necessarily be growing in net terms, since a large share of the gains that flow to owners of capital must be reinvested.

Second, Mr Rognlie’s research suggests that Mr Piketty has overestimated how high the returns on wealth are likely to be in the future. These should also decline over time, he reckons, unless it is very easy for the economy to substitute capital (like robots) for workers. Yet the historical evidence suggests that this is far harder than he suggests.



And third, Mr Rognlie finds that growing returns to wealth have not been distributed equally across all sectors. The return on non-housing wealth has been remarkably stable since 1970 (see chart). Instead, surging house prices are almost entirely responsible for growing returns on capital.
Rob Duke's insight:

Take aways:

1. NIMBY policies are allowing the older home owners to collect the benefits of increasing capital at the expense of younger non-property holders.

2. A focused tax approach targeting these older homeowners is better than Piketty's suggested 2% per year tax on wealth.

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Police say suburban Boston home was wired to explode with flip of a switch

Police say suburban Boston home was wired to explode with flip of a switch | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police said Tuesday that someone wired a house in a Boston suburb to explode when a certain light switch was turned on. 
Rob Duke's insight:

Jeez! Good reason not to rent to Dr. Evil....

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Rodney Ebersole's comment, March 26, 2:41 AM
Wow, this is a good reason to never have a renter. There must be more to this story as to why the renter hated that house or the owners so much. Needless to say I'm glad that no one got hurt and I'm sure that poor electrician was glad he didn't go around flipping switches.
Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, March 26, 5:13 PM
I agree that there has to be more to this story than what we are presented with. Still, though, no matter how bad the situation is, blowing up your landlord is never a good option!
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Talking to Future Cops

Talking to Future Cops | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What are criminal justice students thinking about today? Here are some question I got from students attending the 4-year degree program at the University of Wisconsin in Platteville yesterday. I ha...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, March 26, 5:21 PM
I find it interesting that a lot of these questions tend to be regarding race relations. I can understand the concern, especially with everything going on lately in the media, but at the same time, give it ten years and I can't help but feel like there will be a new code with a new critic of the police force. That said, we do need to focus on addressing this immediate need of rebuilding the public and police relations. We've talked a lot about the us vs them mentality that some police officers get from a police perspective, but I feel like that goes both ways. Police feel like they have to watch their backs all the time (and not just from physical harm, but now also critics of their job), but I bet some people feel that they have to watch out for the police. It will be interesting to see how this (or it is) changes as time goes on or if something else just becomes the new critic.
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Long, long road

Long, long road | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ISRAEL’S creation has many causes, but among the most powerful, argues Bruce Hoffman, is terrorism. For a decade, the anonymous soldiers of the Jewish underground waged a terror campaign to establish a state, targeting first Arabs, then British forces, then Arabs again.
Rob Duke's insight:

The Economist does an excellent job at book reviews.  See this one for an idea of how we might convert terrorists, even Al Qaeda, to political states.

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No Matter What, Building Wealth Always Comes Down to These Four Pillars

No Matter What, Building Wealth Always Comes Down to These Four Pillars | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Building wealth is simple. Not easy, but simple. We'd all like to make more money, but if your long term prize is financial independence, there aren't any shortcuts. There are only these four basic rules.
Rob Duke's insight:

...but these skills have to be taught and then folks have to be given the opportunity to do so.  Minimum wage doesn't cut it.

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Downed AirAsia Flight Took Off From The Worst Major Country For Air Safety Oversight

Downed AirAsia Flight Took Off From The Worst Major Country For Air Safety Oversight | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Until the black box is recovered from AirAsia flight QZ8501, we won't know what caused it to crash into the Java Sea on Dec. 28. One factor that may have put the flight at a safety disadvantage bef...
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Executing the insane is against the law of the land. So why do we keep doing it?

Executing the insane is against the law of the land. So why do we keep doing it? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Such "mindless vengeance," the Supreme Court points out, "simply offends humanity."
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(Empathic Policing) How Empathy Matters: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice

(Empathic Policing) How Empathy Matters: The Role of Empathy in Crime, Policing, and Justice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Chad Posick, Georgia Southern University

 

My associates and I have reviewed recent research and done some additional analyses to pin down what is currently known about empathy – and perceptions of empathy – in the realm of crime and justice. When other factors, like age, sex, race, education, and income are taken into account, empathy turns out to matter in several ways:


Empathetic people are less likely to engage in delinquency or crime. But those who have trouble perceiving how others feel, and have difficulty sharing those feelings, are more likely to engage in wrongful acts – everything from minor juvenile delinquency to the most serious of violent crimes. 

 

Empathy affects how people think about crime and punishment in complex ways. People capable of empathy tend to support tough punishments for crime, but at the same time they are less likely to call for the harshest punishments, such as the death penalty.

 

Empathy and perceptions of empathy help to shape the interactions of police and members of the communities they are assigned to protect. Research on citizen interactions with the police has consistently indicated that the way officers behave determines how they are evaluated by people with whom they interact. When we probe in detail, it turns out community members have more positive evaluations of the police when officers communicate that they understand the issues that matter to community members. Studies specifically show that the police are more likely to be trusted and considered effective at their jobs when they display empathy with the community’s concerns. 

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Who, What, Why: How are cockpit doors locked?

Who, What, Why: How are cockpit doors locked? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How would the cockpit doors on the crashed Germanwings Airbus have been secured?
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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, March 26, 4:28 PM
Interesting. Sad that this happened, but in theory I can the reasoning behind this design. I do think the two in the cockpit rule is a good idea.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, Today, 5:17 AM
It is upsetting that because of one person many other passengers were killed. Interesting enough that all of the gadgets that were made to protect the pilot, actually helped him to kill more than 160 passengers.
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Answers emerge

Answers emerge | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE final few minutes on board Germanwings flight 9252 are too horrific to contemplate. The passenger jet operated by Lufthansa’s low-cost subsidiary crashed in...
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What is our best weapon against ISIS?

What is our best weapon against ISIS? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ISIS recruits shared three things in common.

– They were devout Muslims.

– They were at an age when they tended to be going through an identity crisis.

– They were “sensation-seekers,” the kind of personality that seeks risky behavior.
Rob Duke's insight:

But Stoet says that connection is obvious, and in fact, if we’re going to stop young people from joining ISIS, we need to challenge them on their religious beliefs.

“Even if we accept that people hold these views, we should at least teach children to think very critically about everything. We want to teach people to trust their doubts. If they have doubts, it’s harder for them to hold such extremist views,” he says.

When we asked him how that might be accomplished, he said, “You have Bill Maher, for example. I think he’s doing the right thing by challenging religion on television.”

 

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Highest court reviewing Amanda Knox’s fate

Highest court reviewing Amanda Knox’s fate | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The high court ruling will determine whether to uphold the verdicts, order another appeal or toss out the convictions altogether.
Rob Duke's insight:

Convicted. Overturned on appeal.  Released from jail. Re-tried and convicted. Now awaiting second appeal.

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Rodney Ebersole's comment, March 26, 2:22 AM
What a mess of a case this has proven to be. This seems similiar to me like in the case of double jeopardy. Someone can't be convicted on the same crime twice. So Amanda was convicted of a crime but then found not guilty so she left the jurisdiction of Italy and returned to the USA. Now the US should have jurisdiction over here. Italy no longer should have a say in the matter if they let her go.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, Today, 5:13 AM
In this article, the case was going back and forth from an appeal court to Italy’s Supreme Court. While I was reading it, the thought that there is lots of corruption crossed my mind. Also, it is kind of weird that the court’s process goes for 4 years already, and Knox is behind the bars.
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Today in racism: study: black people over-represented in crime news stories

Today in racism: study: black people over-represented in crime news stories | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

According to a new study by Media Matters for America, four New York City television stations consistently reported crimes by black people at a higher rate than their arrest rates. (Chart to the right/ below.) Between August 18 and December 31 of last year, WCBS, WNBC, WABC, and WNYW (Fox)...


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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, March 26, 5:12 PM
Maybe they are being over-represented because news media are using the stories that they think are interesting and popular at the time. People get stirred up about a shooting? Let's find five other similar stories and make connections. People think that all black people commit crimes, especially in shady neighborhoods, let's support that belief. They are a news center, but that doesn't mean that they are factual or honest. I see the same thing happen all the time in psy studies. People see these surveys or studies done and try to exaggerate or misuse the results. They turn correlations to causation and so forth. Really annoying and hardly ever helps any situation.
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FBI figures tweaked to show phony increase in mass shootings, report says

FBI figures tweaked to show phony increase in mass shootings, report says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
But Lott's group said a major flaw is the fact that the data was gleaned from news reports, and noted recent accounts were more accessible, and thus over-represented. Recent cases of the far more common “active shooting incidents” were added to legitimate cases of mass shooting incidents, making the more recent years covered by the report appear to have a large increase in both mass shootings and deaths from them.
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First Amendment, ‘Patron Saint’ of Protesters, Is Embraced by Corporations

First Amendment, ‘Patron Saint’ of Protesters, Is Embraced by Corporations | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Liberals used to love the First Amendment. But that was in an era when courts used it mostly to protect powerless people like civil rights activists and war protesters.

These days, a provocative new study says, there has been a “corporate takeover of the First Amendment.” The assertion is backed by data, and it comes from an unlikely source: John C. Coates IV, who teaches business law at Harvard and used to be a partner at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, the prominent corporate law firm.

“Corporations have begun to displace individuals as the direct beneficiaries of the First Amendment,” Professor Coates wrote. The trend, he added, is “recent but accelerating.”

 

“Once the patron saint of protesters and the disenfranchised, the First Amendment has become the darling of economic libertarians and corporate lawyers who have recognized its power to immunize private enterprise from legal restraint,” Professor Wu wrote.


Via Svend Aage Christensen
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Congressmen Steve Cohen (D-TN) and Don Young (R-AK) Introduce House Version of Groundbreaking Bipartisan Medical Marijuana Legislation | Drug Policy Alliance

Congressmen Steve Cohen (D-TN) and Don Young (R-AK) Introduce House Version of Groundbreaking Bipartisan Medical Marijuana Legislation | Drug Policy Alliance | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Compassionate Access, Research Expansion and Respect States - CARERS - Act is the most comprehensive medical marijuana bill ever introduced in Congress. The CARERS Act will do the following:

Allow states to legalize marijuana for medical use without federal interference
Permit interstate commerce in cannabidiol (CBD) oils
Reschedule marijuana to schedule II
Allow banks to provide checking accounts and other financial services to marijuana dispensaries
Allow Veterans Administration physicians to recommend medical marijuana to veterans
Eliminate barriers to medical marijuana research.
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, March 26, 3:02 AM
I have to admit I'm surprised that Don Young is pushing this bill through as I didn't realize he was an advocate for this sort of thing. I think the federal government has to do some serious changes in regards to marijuana as so many states are trying to legalize it now and most Americans are for allowing it for medical purposes at least.
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It’s Poverty, Not the 'Teenage Brain,' That Causes the Most Youth Crime

It’s Poverty, Not the 'Teenage Brain,' That Causes the Most Youth Crime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Males looked specifically at the more than 50,000 homicides in California from 1991 to 2002. As one would expect, teenagers perpetrated more of the homicides than other age groups—but only when he did not control for poverty. When he did control for poverty, teenagers committed more crimes than other age groups only in high-poverty areas. In the areas where teenagers had as much money as other middle-aged people, they tended to commit fewer violent crimes. And in the areas where middle-aged people had as little money as other teenagers, those middle-aged people tended to commit just as many violent crimes.
Rob Duke's insight:

Fix poverty and you fix crime.

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Brandal Nicole Crenshaw's comment, March 26, 5:15 PM
Yes- and no. I think that poverty is a HUGE factor. BUT I have a hard time believing that it is all poverty and not a little bit of the insane teenage brain. If it was all poverty, then what is up with aging out? I doubt that everyone suddenly gets wealthier around that age. I will say that having money does also help with getting proper care and providing healthier outlets for the teen mind.
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This Is The Drug In The Rolling Stones' Song "Mother's Little Helper"

This Is The Drug In The Rolling Stones' Song "Mother's Little Helper" | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When The Rolling Stones sang "Mother's Little Helper" back in 1966, they weren't talking about drugs. They were talking about a specific drug that was prescribed for everything from severely ill mental patients to recovering alcoholics to comfortable middle class people who sometimes felt anxious. It was called "Miltown."
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Decriminalization vs. Legalization

Decriminalization vs. Legalization | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Anonymous said: I've been googling a bit and I'm still a little confused about decriminalization vs. legalization. Decriminalizing sex work would mean that sex workers wouldn't be subject to arrest or...

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