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Suspect in Baby, Grandma Deaths Had Casino Losses

Suspect in Baby, Grandma Deaths Had Casino Losses | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Suspect in botched kidnapping that led to deaths of baby, grandmother had lost $15k at casinos...
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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Sex with animals banned in Denmark after outcry over legal loophole

Sex with animals banned in Denmark after outcry over legal loophole | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
According to agricultural minister, Dan Jorgensen (pictured), the country has become a magnet for animal sex tourists in recent years as bestiality is banned in most other European countries.
Rob Duke's insight:

There was probably no need for this law in the past, but open borders and the information age have created a more pressing need.

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Police Shooting Deaths: How we compare to the world....

Police Shooting Deaths: How we compare to the world.... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IN THE basement of St Gregory’s church in Crown Heights, a Brooklyn neighbourhood where kosher pizzerias compete with jerk-chicken shacks for business, the...
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More Female Cops Leads to More Arrests of Female Sexual Predators

More Female Cops Leads to More Arrests of Female Sexual Predators | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Barbara Goldberg at Reuters has a new article about the apparent rise in arrests of female teachers for sexually abusing male students. There's a growing understanding, Goldberg argues, that the underage victims of female sexual predators are just that—victims—and not some lucky young punks who got to live a “hot for teacher”...
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Sworn Virgins: Men by Choice in the Balkans

Sworn Virgins: Men by Choice in the Balkans | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“Becoming a sworn virgin or burrnesha elevated a woman to the status of a man and granted her all the rights and privileges of the male population,” Peters writes on her website.  “In order to manifest the transition, such a woman cut her hair, donned male clothing and sometimes even changed her name. … Most importantly of all, she took a celibacy vow to remain chaste for life.”
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Legal team steps in for street vendor facing hundreds in fines

Legal team steps in for street vendor facing hundreds in fines | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"What kind of work can a woman of 80 years do?" Arce said later, pushing her own cart full of ice creams down Los Angeles Street. "Nothing."

::

The tickets amount to an occupational hazard for the throngs of sidewalk sellers who shill fresh orange juice, hot dogs wrapped in bacon, used clothing, toys and a laundry list of other goods in bustling stretches of downtown and MacArthur Park. The police come. The sellers scatter. Those unable to escape get citations.

But, like Calderon, many simply come back.
Rob Duke's insight:

Should there be a rule?  Should it make exceptions?

Is there any room in the law for human dignity?

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Rob Duke's comment, Today, 2:30 AM
The LAPD commander makes a good point that tends to support the deontology perspective--there ought to be a rule; and, if there is, then it should apply to everyone.
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Sewol Ferry Captain Escapes Death Penalty in South Korea — Again | VICE News

Sewol Ferry Captain Escapes Death Penalty in South Korea — Again | VICE News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
He is the ferry captain that will forever be remembered for the video that shows him leaping from the MV Sewol in a soaking sweater and his underwear as hundreds of passengers, mostly children, drowned in the hull of the dilapidated ferry, which sank off the coast of South Korea on April 16, 2014.

Nothing, not even Lee Joon-seok's lawyers, who appealed his 36-year prison sentence for negligence and abandonment, could erase the photos and footage of his hurried exit from the public records. Yet, despite testimony given by several survivors of the tragedy and the unflattering public perception of Lee that helped establish his guilt, judges decided Monday to once again spare the captain from the death penalty at the final hearing of an appeals trial at Gwangju High Court — a fate the 69-year-old had already managed to escape last November. Instead, Lee was sentenced to life in prison.
Rob Duke's insight:

Ship Captain is a huge responsibility.  I wonder how much of this is cultural and how much is law of the sea?

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Poll: Should cops be allowed to swear on the job?

Poll: Should cops be allowed to swear on the job? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Should cops be allowed to swear on the job? Steve Osborne, a Jersey City native and a 20-year veteran New York Police Department cop, couldn't believe the language that was coming out the mouth of an NYPD deputy commissioner...
Rob Duke's insight:

Take the poll if you dare.

I'll tell you how I voted after we get a few voters....

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Uneasy rider

Uneasy rider | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
But most Poles are alarmed by the way Russia is using the history of its victory over Nazi Germany to justify intervening in Ukraine and throwing its weight around in eastern Europe. The Night Wolves' ride was clearly part of the propaganda offensive, and Katyn Rally's support for the gang may not be as inexplicable as it seems. One of the Katyn Rally bikers at the Warsaw ceremony hinted at what might be the main reason for the group's support of the Russians: “I just want to continue visiting my ancestors' graves in the East.” Condemning the Polish ban on the Night Wolves is a good way to ensure that they are not banned themselves by Russia.
Rob Duke's insight:

Get your motor running;

Head out on the highway;

Get stopped at the border :(

That's the end of the song....

 

 

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Bamboozled: What the bar codes on your driver's license reveal about you, and why it matters

Bamboozled: What the bar codes on your driver's license reveal about you, and why it matters | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Why you should ask questions before you allow a merchant to scan your driver's license.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, April 27, 7:38 PM
I thought this article was interesting, I respect that the lady didn’t want the doctors office she was at to make a copy of her license and I think it is a little crazy that they would not see her without scanning her license. I didn’t know you could get so much information from your license by just scanning the bar codes on the back. It makes sense that the police use these to quickly scan your license and view things about you but I didn’t know that anyone could just buy one of these scanners or download an app that lets you scan these and get all of your information! I have never even thought about this or considered it and it is scary how far along technology is coming.
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What California can learn from Saudi Arabia’s water mystery

What California can learn from Saudi Arabia’s water mystery | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Beginning in the late 1970s, Saudi landowners were given free rein to pump the aquifers so that they could transform the desert into irrigated fields. Saudi Arabia soon became one of the world’s premier wheat exporters.

By the 1990s, farmers were pumping an average of 5 trillion gallons a year. At that rate, it would take just 25 years to completely drain Lake Erie.
Rob Duke's insight:

Is this a green collar crime?  Or just an oops....?

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Scandal-scarred NYPD detective defends his most infamous cases

Simpson also ripped Scarcella for his personal conduct, taking issue with his not being able to recall details of the investigation and with the wording of business cards he used on the job.
The cards described him and Chmil as “adventures [sic], marathoners, regular guys, and mountain climbers,” which Simpson said showed a “cavalier disposition to the serious obligation of investigating homicides.”
She noted his statement on the “Dr. Phil” show that he “did not play by the rules,” and she alleged he came into her courtroom with his gun after she told him not to.
“This indicates a lack of boundaries or no regard to any consequences in violating rules,” Simpson wrote.
Her conclusion: “The testimony provided at the hearing by Scarcella was false, misleading and noncooperative . . . The pattern and practice of Scarcella’s conduct. which manifest a disregard for rules, law and the truth, undermines our judicial system and gives cause for a new review of the evidence.”
Rob Duke's insight:

Not the whole story, of course, but what he says about the judge's ruling appears to me to have some merit.  Cases years old that are similar to other cases--will I remember details?  No way.  Bringing a gun when told not to?  Who's going to protect me from the front of the court house to my home on the subway (in a city where I was a cop for 30 years)?  Sounds a bit like Aristotle's Natural Law to think a cop would need to pack a weapon.

And the business card leap of logic? How does listing one's hobbies make one a dirty cop?  Columbo was fiction, but there was a lot of truth in getting people to drop their guard by showing you had things in common with them.

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Rob Duke's comment, April 26, 10:26 PM
BTW, he checked the gun into the security check point. So, she's not mad that he brought a gun into her court, but that he carried a gun to court and checked it into a gun locker.
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How Fishing Pros Finally Caught George Perry's Miracle Bass

How Fishing Pros Finally Caught George Perry's Miracle Bass | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In late 2009, two men walked into a room somewhere in Japan and found a fisherman hooked up to a polygraph. His name was Manabu Kurita, and he was there to answer some questions. The 32-year-old fishing guide had claimed to have caught a bass that weighed just under 22 pounds, 5 ounces — a weight that would make it co-world-record holder in the all-tackle weight category for largemouth bass, the most hallowed class in all of fishing. The other men in the room were representatives from the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) and, with the polygraph running, they asked Kurita about the precise position of his boat on Japan’s Lake Biwa and the tackle he used to haul in his catch. His answers from the hourlong session evidently passed muster; six months after he hauled the fish in, the catch was certified as the IGFA’s co-world-record holder.
Rob Duke's insight:

Weird, but true.  Unusual use of the polygraph.

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Rodney Ebersole's comment, April 27, 2:57 AM
Interesting article about the joys of fishing and the race to catch the biggest bass. I’m not surprised a lie detector is being used to verify the winners of those who catch these large fish, this competition sounds like the holy grail in bass fishing and I could see someone trying to cheat. A lie detector levels the playing field and ensures the authenticity of any winning catch.
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Risks of ‘Brain Damage’ associated with long-term exposure to air pollution – Harvard study says

Risks of ‘Brain Damage’ associated with long-term exposure to air pollution – Harvard study says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Rob Duke's insight:

Environmental Justice?

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Meagan Olsen's comment, April 27, 7:23 PM
The fact that air pollution could have affects on the brain is a scary thought. Something will have to dramatically change in our environment if we wish to change the amount of air pollution in our world. I don’t think it is enough to affect people in an every day lifestyle, only people who are exposed to the pollution a lot and like the article said, the elderly.
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Conquer Your Nerves Before Your Presentation

Conquer Your Nerves Before Your Presentation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
While there is some difference in how the brain processes physical and social pain, our neurological response to getting pinched, for example, is strikingly similar our response to rejection. And since public speaking offers us the opportunity to face rejection on a grand scale, it’s no wonder that some people fear it worse than death.
Rob Duke's insight:

Prepare;

Visualize success;

 

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Why I killed Jeffrey Dahmer

Why I killed Jeffrey Dahmer | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer was done in by his uncontrollable lust for human flesh, the man who whacked him in prison 20 years ago told The Post, revealing for the first time why the cannibal had ...
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Judge: FBI's Ruse to Catch Poker Champ in Vegas Hotel Room Went Too Far

Judge: FBI's Ruse to Catch Poker Champ in Vegas Hotel Room Went Too Far | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A federal judge in Las Vegas has ruled that FBI agents went too far when they shut off Internet service to a Las Vegas hotel room last summer, then posed as repairmen so they could get a peek into the room without a search warrant.
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A bill for juvenile injustice - The Hindu

A bill for juvenile injustice - The Hindu | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nearly 25 years ago, India ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and joined the world in making a promise to protect and promote the rights of children.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Nine await execution in Indonesia, as foreign hopes for reprieve fade

Nine await execution in Indonesia, as foreign hopes for reprieve fade | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nine drug traffickers were being held in isolation cells at an Indonesian maximum security prison on Tuesday awaiting execution by firing squad, after Indonesian authorities notified them they had no hope of reprieve.

Security at the prison was heightened and religious counsellors, doctors and the firing squad were alerted to start final preparations for the execution of the four Nigerians, two Australians, an Indonesian, a Brazilian and a Filipina.
Rob Duke's insight:

The story continues....

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Alleged Gambell pizza thieves try to sell them to police officers

Alleged Gambell pizza thieves try to sell them to police officers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Of 80 frozen pizzas stolen Sunday in the village of Gambell, 75 have been recovered, according to Alaska State Troopers. 

Village police officers received their "strongest investigative lead" in the case when John Koozaata, 29, and Lewis Oozeva, 21, called the Gambell Police Department and tried to sell the pizzas to on-duty officers, according to a trooper dispatch posted online Monday. 

At 10 a.m. Sunday, troopers in Nome received report of the burglary in Gambell, a village on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea. 

Investigation revealed that Koozaata and Oozeva had broken into the Gambell Native Store warehouse in the early morning. They took five cases of frozen pizza, troopers said. The cases (80 pizzas in total) were valued at more than $1,100, or about $13.75 per pizza, according to troopers. 
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How Mexicans know when an earthquake is coming

How Mexicans know when an earthquake is coming | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The impact on society was greater still. Some historians believe it contributed to the end of the hegemony of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, whose incompetence in the aftermath of the earthquake undermined its claim to be the party that knew best how to govern. The scale of the disaster, and the ineptitude of the official response, galvanised civil society like never before. Mexico City’s residents resolved that next time they would be prepared.
Rob Duke's insight:

Here's some of that societal impact that I talked about in another article this last week....

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Is LSD about to return to polite society?

Feilding has dedicated her life to the reversal of this proscription, first as an artist and latterly as a tireless supporter of scientific research, courtesy of her Beckley Foundation. The dangers of abusing recreational drugs have been well documented since the 1960s, and for many scientists and policy-makers they remain as urgent as ever. Feilding hopes to show that the risks are overstated and that the laws surrounding their use should be relaxed. After decades of perseverance, there are signs that her work is coming to fruition. A handful of studies using LSD and psilocybin (the psychedelic compound found in mushrooms) has turned into a steady trickle, and the results have been promising to her cause. More remarkably, some of the theories thrown about half a century ago might be borne out by modern science.
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Alaska, where rivers reign

Alaska, where rivers reign | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Because fewer than 6,000 miles of certified public roads and highways probe Alaska's 570,374 square miles, rivers are especially important. Alaskans' dependence on rivers for in-state travel is critical, particularly for rural residents whose road systems are at best localized and short.
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A French Soldier's View of US Soldiers in Afghanistan

To those who bestow us with the honor of sharing their combat outposts and who everyday give proof of their military excellence, to those who pay the daily tribute of America's army's deployment on Afghan soil, to those we owned this article, ourselves hoping that we will always remain worthy of them and to always continue hearing them say that we are all the same band of brothers".
Rob Duke's insight:

How one French soldier saw us when he served in Afghanistan with the U.S. Army.  Makes me proud.

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Rob Duke's comment, April 26, 10:29 PM
BTW, not a soldier, but proud of them just the same.
DERRICK NELSON's comment, April 26, 10:34 PM
Wherever terrorist reap havoc causing political crimes in Afghan the U.S. military will always look and fight with professionalism.
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Push, Don’t Crush, the Students

Push, Don’t Crush, the Students | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In Silicon Valley, mixed messages fuel a best-in-class mentality.
Rob Duke's insight:

Just a reminder during the stress of finals--if you see something, say something?  That can mean all the difference to someone struggling.

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Five Years After The BP Oil Spill, The Industry Is Still Taking Big Risks

Five Years After The BP Oil Spill, The Industry Is Still Taking Big Risks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In early April of 2010, I flew to Mobile, Alabama, to report a story for The Wall Street Journal. I covered the oil industry for the paper, and a few weeks earlier, President Obama had announced pl...
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DERRICK NELSON's comment, April 26, 11:03 PM
The bottom line is money motivation. Although simple safety precautions are followed, giant corporations such as BP will forego risk in an effort to produce top dollar returns. As long as money is a prime motivator in corporate America green collar crimes will always prevail.
Rob Duke's comment, April 27, 1:07 AM
Derrick: Truth over Justice. I think Socrates said that. The RCAC in Valdez is a good model of citizen involvement in the oversight of resource extraction.