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Team Anna's reading of corruption is wrong: Amartya Sen

Team Anna's reading of corruption is wrong: Amartya Sen | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nobel laureate Amartya Sen believes that Team Anna's reading of corruption or what causes corruption or how it can removed is wrong, and that they need to look at how the economic system operates.
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This State Has the Highest Use of Mood-Altering Drugs

This State Has the Highest Use of Mood-Altering Drugs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Everyone needs to unwind, but we don't all do it in the same way. Among the 50 states, it is people in West Virginia who most commonly report taking mood-altering drugs to help them relax, whereas Alaskans are the least likely to say the same, a new poll
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The right to be rude

The right to be rude | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
the law has been amended so that insulting language no longer incurs prosecution merely because the police think it has the potential to offend. It must be shown that an insult was directed at a particular person or group, and that offence was taken. But civil libertarians want the law further amended to protect insulting speech and take away the reference to religious aggravation. Although Britain has abolished its ancient ban on blasphemy, which punished insults against Christianity, the concept of religious aggravation amounts to a new sort of blasphemy law that could be used to prevent criticism of any religion
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Robber Barons Would Have Loved Facebook's Employee Housing | WIRED

Robber Barons Would Have Loved Facebook's Employee Housing | WIRED | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As Silicon Valley bursts at its suburban seams, one tech company after another has been buying up properties throughout the region and embarking on ambitious development projects.
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How does a denial-of-service attack work?

How does a denial-of-service attack work? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
INTERNET-FREEDOM advocates hope Lu Wei, China’s internet tsar, will indicate today whether the authorities have any knowledge of a raid on GitHub, an...
Rob Duke's insight:

Flood server with requests for service thus over burdening and shutting down the site (or at least denying access to legitimate users).

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Drug Courts: equivocal evidence on a popular intervention

Drug Courts: equivocal evidence on a popular intervention | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This report critically analyses the benefits and failures of drug courts, in particular how they undermine health and human rights.

Via ReGenUC
Rob Duke's insight:

A different take on drug courts.

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ReGenUC's curator insight, March 29, 9:10 PM

OSF report on the challenges of effectively implementing (and evaluating) drug-courts, particularly how they are affected by local drug policy and the attitudes of court officials. You can see the recent evaluation report for Victoria's Drug Court here: http://sco.lt/6XpDaT

Julius Matilainen's comment, March 30, 8:10 PM
I do like the ide of generating new approaches on the matter. Like said and as seen, the criminal punishments like incarceration is not the best solution for drug offense. But I also agree on the statement stated in the final chapter, that even though new means should be considered everyone’s right’s must be respected doing so.
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Is marijuana a gateway drug?

Is marijuana a gateway drug? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“AS LONG as I am governor of New Jersey, there won’t be legalised marijuana in this state,” vowed Chris Christie, governor of New Jersey, on March 25th. A...
Rob Duke's insight:

Criminalized, it creates a black market.  If you can live with a black market and all that it comes with, keep MJ illegal.

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Gaynor Johansen's comment, March 29, 6:22 PM
Making marijuana a legal drug I think lessens the link between it being a gateway drug. One reason I agree with the fact that it could be is because you get into a bad crowd so you are more likely to be introduced into worse things.
Kyle May's comment, March 30, 3:01 AM
I believe that making marijuana legal will lessen the stigma that comes from it from being illegal. If it is legal, you won't have the introduction to hard drugs as you may buying from a black market dealer. Also, more legalization of it will raise awareness of it, and even the article noted that the use of hard drugs decreased as the use of marijuana increased.
Julius Matilainen's comment, March 30, 7:54 PM
I like the statistical argument at the end of the article. I also agree that legalization will lessen the stigma and eventually marijuana will be quite in the same position than tobacco or alcohol. And true: it is safer to buy it from the regulated seller than from a shady guy at black market. And like said when legal, the awareness and education given will better, and it will be given to more people.
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Atheistic China claims 'right to reincarnate' Dalai Lama

Atheistic China claims 'right to reincarnate' Dalai Lama | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
BEIJING (AP) — China's Communist Party is officially atheist, but that has not stopped it from making some impassioned claims on the afterlife. Some of the strongest language at this week's annual national congress has been reserved for the Dalai...
Rob Duke's insight:

Sounds like the anti-pope John XXIII, who spent 1410-1415 as a rival pope.

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Open to investigation: Palestine joins the International Criminal Court.

Open to investigation: Palestine joins the International Criminal Court. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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Palestine joins the International Criminal Court.  (Video).

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Why Saudis are ardent social media fans

Why Saudis are ardent social media fans | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Clerics, including salafist-jihadists, use the internet and social-media apps to spread their message to the vast swathe of the population that is devout and, as such, potentially susceptible to their ideas. But it is impossible to stem enthusiasm for all things online. On the whole, most reckon social media is more of a force for liberalisation. And there is no sign that the appetite for it is slowing.
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Finland millionaire gets 54,000 euro speeding ticket

Finland millionaire gets 54,000 euro speeding ticket | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As the BBC reports, businessman Reima Kuisla was pulled over for driving 64 mph in a 50-mph zone in Finland earlier this March when he received a 54,000 euro fine (almost $60,000), because speeding tickets in the country are linked to the recipient's annual income.
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Gaynor Johansen's comment, March 29, 5:00 PM
If you are wealthy it seems unfair but overall it actually creating a more fair system. It makes the punishment the same for everyone instead of a flat fee that might be pennies to someone so there is no real punishment. On the other hand the flat fee might be the difference between making rent or not that month.
Kyle May's comment, March 30, 3:06 AM
I think that it is an interesting system that Finland has set up regarding speeding, but I don't think it is horribly fair though. Why punish a person who makes more than someone who makes less? Why not punish them all the same. Income-based separation always happens, there will always be a rich and a poor, but why should one be punished more for it? If this was reversed, with poorer families being fined more - everyone would be up in arms about it.
Julius Matilainen's comment, March 30, 7:37 PM
This is not the first time this thing has came up. It was probably the Nokia executive news that I remember, and the subject this keeps constantly popping up in national news. Well usually that amount is not the final “number”. The people who are given checks such huge amount usually get the amount dropped by court claiming that punishment is not reasonable. Which it of course is not. It takes a push of few papers and usually the fines are settled down by court. I personally find that the deterrence is proper. If I was as wealthy as those guys I would have my own driver ;). Seriously if the fine like 85€ would be same to everyone, guys like him would always drive too fast.
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Juxtapoz Magazine - NYPD to Put 30,000 More Crime Scene Photos Online

Juxtapoz Magazine - NYPD to Put 30,000 More Crime Scene Photos Online | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The New York Police Department, with the help of a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, plans to digitize and make around 30,000 crim...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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DERRICK NELSON's comment, March 29, 6:15 PM
These photos in a way help promote social control by showing the public the realities of how crime looks. Criminals out there that have not yet been apprehended could possibly look at these pictures and choose a different path to redemption.
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The Radical Humaneness of Norway’s Halden Prison

The Radical Humaneness of Norway’s Halden Prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The goal of the Norwegian penal system is to get inmates out of it.
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Kyle May's comment, March 30, 3:10 AM
It is such a foreign site seeing the liberties that these inmates have. I could not imagine such freedom being given to inmates here in the U.S., as I feel that we have a more violent culture and all those freedoms would be horribly abused. Such as the photos of the knifes on the wall, I could not imagine letting that be okay in our prison system. Family overnight stays? Norway has truly master the art of making something that is supposed to be bad seem good.
max mckernan's comment, March 30, 4:52 AM
I definitely do not see this ever working with in the united states prison system. We have to many inmates and as seen in our prisons now there are major issues with gangs and crime. A prison of this kind would just encourage crime. how ever if it was to be implimented at the lower risk crime levels it would be incredibly helpful because it could separate repeat offenders from non repeat offenders. The issue for the U.S. citizens is the incredible cost almost triple of what it is normal.
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For Successful Kids, It’s Family Stability Over Family Structure - Citings and Sightings

For Successful Kids, It’s Family Stability Over Family Structure - Citings and Sightings | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Via nadia dresscher
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Capital crimes

Capital crimes | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE world is gradually moving away from capital punishment. At the end of 2014, 98 countries had abolished the death penalty, compared with 59 countries in...
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Underweight models could go to prison under French proposals

Underweight models could go to prison under French proposals | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Italy, Israel and Spain have all passed bills banning the use of ultra-thin models, with France expected to follow suit. The French National Assembly is considering a health reform bill that includes measures to ban designers and labels from using models deemed "too thin" by healthcare standards. Very thin models would be required to prove they have a minimum Body Mass Index (BMI) of 18, with a medical certificate. They would then be subjected to periodic weigh-ins. Models who come in under weight would face fines of up to 75,000 euros, (£55,000) or even prison sentences. Jamie Gavin, founder and managing director of media agency inPress, has welcomed the proposals.


Via Ziggi Ivan Santini
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Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, March 31, 4:30 PM

The idea of restricting the types of models used in the fashion industry may or may not have any lasting effects on population mental health. However, punishing the models themselves seems completely absurd and inappropriate. If anyone should be fined or punished, it must necessarily be the modelling agencies and those responsible for actually driving the industry. How is it possible that Spain, Italy and Israel have already supported this??!

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What Marijuana Actually Does to Your Brain and Body

What Marijuana Actually Does to Your Brain and Body | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Marijuana. Pot. Weed. Whatever you call it, it's the most popular illegal drug in the world, gaining support for legalization for both medicinal and recreational purposes. But what does marijuana actually do to us? Let's take a look at this fascinating drug, its health effects, and potential concerns about using it.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, March 31, 6:15 PM
I think it is interesting to read about what marijuana does to the brain. It makes sense that you shouldn’t drive or operate machinery while on it because it affects your skills. Also it affects each person differently as most drugs do but it seems to vary more then other drugs because people can have completely different reactions from severe to hardly feeling anything. It is also scary that there are long-term effects on memory and concentration and I don’t think most people realize that!
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The argument for eating dog

The argument for eating dog | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The idea is difficult to stomach, but John Sutter writes that eating dog is morally equivalent to eating pig, another intelligent animal.
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Meagan Olsen's comment, March 31, 6:30 PM
This article was a little hard to read because it seems morally wrong to do this! I can’t believe that people eat dogs, it seems wrong to me and I can’t even think of ever doing that! I see the argument that it could go the same way with other animals that we eat, if you raise the animal knowing it will be eaten, then it would be easier; just like we raise farm animals knowing we are going to kill and eat them at some point. In some countries like Vietnam, they don’t view dogs as pets and companions therefore it is easy for them to do this because dogs are like their farm animals. It is all a mental thing I think and has to do with how you are raised and what your morals are with animals I guess. I still would never eat dog and I don’t agree with killing them for food at all.
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Guess Who Cares For Young Adults When They Move Back Home

Guess Who Cares For Young Adults When They Move Back Home | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Perhaps all this indicates Americans are drifting towards the lifestyles of past generations. The percentage of young adults living at home, which is considered today to be a striking increase, is still low compared to historical data. For most of the U.S.’s history, the multigenerational household was the norm.
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The devil, or Mr Wang

The devil, or Mr Wang | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As leader of the Communist Party’s most sustained and wide-ranging anti-corruption campaign in its history, he often urges his investigators to be “frightening”. One story goes that at a meeting of the party’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI), convened after Mr Wang took charge of it in November 2012, senior members—themselves among the most feared officials in the party—were presented with dossiers of their own sins. Mr Wang’s aim, it appeared, was to terrorise the enforcers themselves. Failure to uncover high-level graft, he has warned them, would be “dereliction of duty”.
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How twins from Little Village rose to win trust of drug kingpin El Chapo

How twins from Little Village rose to win trust of drug kingpin El Chapo | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Margarito Flores was cruising through Humboldt Park in a brand new Cadillac on a fall evening when Chicago police stopped him.
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A guttering flame

A guttering flame | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Al Jazeera’s influence has since waned amid perceptions that its journalism has turned partisan. Even as it championed Syria’s mainly Sunni rebels, some of whom were later financed by Qatar, it ignored Bahrain’s mainly Shia uprising.

The most acute criticism surrounds Al Jazeera’s kind treatment of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, a line that corresponded closely with Qatar’s foreign policy.
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Mexican drug cartels still have market niche for low end marijuana

Mexican drug cartels still have market niche for low end marijuana | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
there’s still a market niche for Mexico’s lower-end drug trade weed, since legal marijuana in states like Washington and Colorado is more expensive. “Complete substitution has not gone into effect,” he said, “The market is definitely changing, but cartel adaptation will happen in years not months.”
Rob Duke's insight:

We should consider having lower taxes for 3% and lower THC concentrations of Cannabis Sativa strains.  This would reduce the ability of cartels to compete and, yet, allow market differentiation for those with more exotic tastes.  For instance:

 

-higher THC concentrations;

-hash;

-hash oil;

-Cannabis Indica strains and IndicaXSativa strains.

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The GOP’s Sex Trafficking Shell Game: How Laws Against ‘Sex Trafficking’ End Up Hurting Women

The GOP’s Sex Trafficking Shell Game: How Laws Against ‘Sex Trafficking’ End Up Hurting Women | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Republicans are insisting on tacking anti-abortion language onto an anti-sex-trafficking bill—and it’s just their latest effort to exploit the issue to fight “sexual immorality.”

Via Gracie Passette
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Gaynor Johansen's comment, March 29, 5:56 PM
I think that the article brings up some good points. The sex trafficking victims, voluntary or not, should be protected and helped. Government funding is probably the only way they would be able to get any programs for that so not allowing government funding would hurt the people that were victimized.
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Italy's top court overturns Amanda Knox conviction

Italy's top court overturns Amanda Knox conviction | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a final ruling, Italy's highest court on Friday overturned the convictions of American Amanda Knox and her former Italian boyfriend in the sensational murder case of Knox's British roommate.
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DERRICK NELSON's comment, March 29, 6:35 PM
In this case regardless of the legal mishaps whether Knox and her boyfriend was guilty or not the social labeling associated with murders will remain. Throughout this trial I don't doubt for a moment that the media stigmatized these two as dangerous people. The consequences of this case will forever change Knox's view of Italy and its legal system.
John Oulton's comment, March 30, 1:16 AM
It is twice as worse to be in jail and convicted of murder in another country. The lack of evidence pressured the cops of the unsolved murder of her roommate. Italy has an entire different view in this case but what could they indict them of when there is no new evidence? I am glad Amanda Knox got her life back because she is entirely innocent.
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Regulators launch major crackdown on payday lenders

Regulators launch major crackdown on payday lenders | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Federal regulators are launching a major crackdown on payday and other short-term, high-interest lenders by proposing tough new regulations to halt the cycle of debt that cripples some consumers.
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