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New International Focus on Prosecution of White-Collar Crime

There's no full access to the article but the abstract is none-the-less interesting.
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Criminology and Economic Theory
In search of viable criminological theory
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Could We Give Criminals Corrective Brain Implants?

Could We Give Criminals Corrective Brain Implants? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
…It’s likely we will have cranial implants in two decades time that will be able to send signals to our brains that manipulate our behaviors. Those implants will be able to control out-of-control tempers and violent actions—and maybe even unsavory thoughts. This type of tech raises the obvious question: Instead of killing someone who has committed a terrible crime, should we instead alter their brain and the way it functions to make them a better person?
Rob Duke's insight:

Danger! Danger! Will Robinson.....

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Rudeness Spreads Like a Virus, Study Says

Rudeness Spreads Like a Virus, Study Says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Being uncivil at work is the rudeness equivalent of sneezing and hacking all over your colleagues.

Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 10:30 AM

(From the article): Reading this research one could be compelled to ask: are we currently suffering from an rudeness epidemic, passing around the incivility bug like a classroom full of coughing and sneezing kids? While the root causes of bad workplace behavior are probably multiple, this study is enough to suggest that if your place of employment is the scene of lots of stress-inducing unkindness, you might want to consider a quarantine, consciously recognizing the ability of rudeness to spread and stepping away to regroup when you experience it so as to keep one incident from inciting another.

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Reading their minds

Reading their minds | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Brain waves Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. By Carl Safina. Henry Holt; 461 pages; $32. The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins. By Hal Whitehead and...
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Understanding Psychology Makes Economics Better

Understanding Psychology Makes Economics Better | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Understanding behavior isn't a way to justify government intervention.
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37 Million People Use Ashley Madison, The Website For Infidelity

37 Million People Use Ashley Madison, The Website For Infidelity | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’ve been working with NPR to discuss a number of the week. This time, it’s 37 million — the number of users of Ashley Madison, an online dating site for married people looking for an affair. Last…
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Mass Shootings in America | Stanford University Libraries

Mass Shootings in America | Stanford University Libraries | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Over the past few years, mass shootings in the United States have shaped national debates such as gun laws debates, law enforcement, school safety, and mental health debates. The Stanford Geospatial Center (SGC) contributes to these debates by providing additional research that can lead to a better understanding of mass shootings in the United States.


Via Jocelyn Stoller, Svend Aage Christensen
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Slavery to Mass Incarceration [VIDEO]

Slavery did not end in 1865


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7 ways living in Switzerland ruined America for me

The Swiss work hard, but they have a strong work-life balance. According to data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the average Swiss worker earned the equivalent of $91,574 a year in 2013, while the average American worker earned only $55,708. But the real story is that the average American had to work 219 hours more per year for this lesser salary.

Which brings us to lunch. In Switzerland, you don't arrive to a meeting late, but you also don't leave for your lunch break a second past noon. If it's summer, jumping into the lake to swim with the swans is an acceptable way to spend your lunch hour. If you eat a sandwich at your desk, people will scold you. I learned this the hard way.

"Ugh," said Tom, a Swiss art director I shared an office with at a Zurich ad agency. "It smells like someone ate their lunch in here." He threw open the windows and fanned the air.

"They did. I ate a sandwich here," I said.

Tom looked at me like I was crazy.

"No. Tomorrow you're having a proper lunch. With me," he said.

The next day, exactly at noon, we rode the funicular to a restaurant where we dined al fresco above Zurich. After lunch, we strolled down the hill. I felt guilty for being gone for an hour and a half. But no one had missed us at the office.

Lunchtime is sacred time in Switzerland. When I was on maternity leave, my husband came home for lunch to help me care for our daughter. This strengthened our marriage. Many families still reunite during weekdays over the lunch hour.

Weekends in Switzerland encourage leisure time, too. On Sundays, you can't even shop — most stores are closed. You are semi-required to hike in the Alps with your family. It's just what you do.

Rob Duke's insight:

She goes on to relate that she had:

Time and money;

An amazing unemployment system;

Lots of paid vacation and wasn't made to feel guilty about using it;

Never needed a car;

Great health care.

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The nuclear deal’s other winner

The nuclear deal’s other winner | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
AT DUBAI CREEK in the United Arab Emirates the dock workers load everything from computers to cigarettes onto dhows headed across the Persian Gulf to Iran. At the...
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Award-winning Music Artist John Legend Gives His All to End Mass Incarceration

Award-winning Music Artist John Legend Gives His All to End Mass Incarceration | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Stepping onto the advocacy stage in 2012 after producing the documentary “The House I Live In”, John Legend visited U.S. prisons, Portugal, and launched #FREEAMERICA, a multi-year culture
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Did This Woman Just Solve an Arson on Live TV? | VICE | United States

Apparently Heather Tenney's cousin started it because he was mad he couldn't get with her.
Rob Duke's insight:

Um? Ok?

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L.A. County Sheriff: New law plays ‘significant’ role in crime rise

L.A. County Sheriff: New law plays ‘significant’ role in crime rise | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
So far this year, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department reports a 3.39 percent increase in violent crime and a 6.9 percent increase in property crime.

“We had 10 years of crime reductions, we were at 50-year lows in many areas on crime statistics, and all of a sudden, right after November when 47 kicked in that changed and fairly dramatically, very quickly,” he said. “It would be naive to say that 47 didn’t play a major role in that.”
Rob Duke's insight:

I'm not on the street anymore, but the cops have a great deal of control for what crimes get reported.  If the cops are taking paper on everything, they may be creating a crime surge.  That's more difficult with violent crime, but would be fairly easy to accomplish for misdemeanors.

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The enemy within

The enemy within | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Yet three precepts are always worth bearing in mind. The first is that firms need to focus on the people who have the greatest capacity to do harm—those who control the money and information. The more complicated companies become, the harder it is to identify where power really lies. But one thing is clear. The more dependent on information firms get, the more IT specialists can compromise the whole business. The least companies can do is to keep a careful watch on the IT department—and, if you’re going to sack somebody from that team, do so immediately.

The second is that the human touch is still invaluable. Companies can certainly strengthen their hand by installing software that can identify anomalous behaviour or monitor e-mail, or by employing forensic accountants to double-check the accounts. But rogue employees are usually a step ahead of their employers: they will simply shift to text messaging if they think that their e-mails are being watched. Companies can probably do more by listening to company gossip. Corporate-security firms get some of their best results by using “spies” to hang around in the smoking room or go out for drinks after work.

The best way to fight the enemy within is to treat your employees with respect. And this third principle is where many firms fail. They may embrace the rhetoric that nothing matters more than their people, but too many workers feel that nothing matters less. According to a recent survey by Accenture, a consultancy, 31% of employees don’t like their boss, 32% were actively looking for a new job, and 43% felt that they received no recognition for their work. The biggest problem with trying to do more with less is that you can end up turning your sheep into wolves—and your biggest resources into your biggest liabilities.
Rob Duke's insight:

From the article: "One of the most effective ways for outsiders to damage a company is to strike up a relationship with an insider. This can sometimes be fairly crude: bribing a cleaner to replace a keyboard with a carefully-modified lookalike or swapping a USB stick for a virus-laden doppelganger. But it is often more sophisticated. Many of the biggest corporate disasters in recent years are likely to have involved collaborators. Security experts suspect that the hackers who stole the personal information of about 40m customers from Target, an American retail chain, in 2013 may have had help from insiders (the store refuses to comment)."

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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Sociology, Health & Wellbeing
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Social Capital and Pierre Bourdieu: A Digest

Social Capital and Pierre Bourdieu: A Digest | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Pierre Bourdieu is a sociologist who’s interest focused on social class and stratification along with inequality. His perspectives evolved through trying to develop a cultural anthropology of social reproduction. In the 1960s he described the [...]

Via Dr Derek Jones
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Dr Derek Jones's curator insight, Today, 4:25 AM

Bourdieu is relevant to discussion of health inequality because of his concern with social class. His idea of cultural capital also fits with the idea that social exclusion is not just about economic status. As someone who has come to academia from a non-traditional background it also makes sense to me in terms of why I always feel like a bit of an outsider.

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RIVERSIDE: Should more police cars be marked?

RIVERSIDE: Should more police cars be marked? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Now, Riverside Councilman Mike Soubirous is asking whether repainting some of the city’s unmarked cars would make the police force more visible and help deter crime, a notion some law enforcement officials say has been debunked by their experiences and numerous studies.
Soubirous, a retired California Highway Patrol officer, is questioning why the Riverside Police Department has more unmarked vehicles than marked ones and how the unmarked cars are used. He has asked the council’s public safety committee to discuss repainting some of the unmarked cars black and white.
Rob Duke's insight:

Micromanager in chief.

 

RPD has had a great reputation for years.  When I started in '85, they were driving completely white cars with just the city seal on the doors.

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Police in Sweden question and test Snoop Dogg for suspected drug use after concert

Police in Sweden question and test Snoop Dogg for suspected drug use after concert | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Swedish police say they briefly held U.S. rapper Snoop Dogg on suspicion of drug use after he performed a concert near Stockholm.

National police spokesman Fredrik Wallen says a police patrol in the city of Uppsala, north of the capital, stopped a car in which Snoop Dog was a passenger on Saturday evening after the concert. Police questioned him at a local police station and tested him for suspected drug use.
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‪[NIS Hacking Scandal] NIS Agent's Suicide Note, "My Excessive Desire to Do the Work Well..."

‪[NIS Hacking Scandal] NIS Agent's Suicide Note, "My Excessive Desire to Do the Work Well..." | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Im was an NIS agent and also a cyber security expert who had overseen tasks related to the hacking program. A police official said, "As the controversy surrounding the hacking program which the NIS bought from an Italian spyware firm, Hacking Team, intensified, it appears Im was mentally burdened and made an extreme decision."
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The Technology Behind Bitcoin Could Replace Lawyers, Too | HP

The Technology Behind Bitcoin Could Replace Lawyers, Too | HP | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Smart contracts promise to relieve businesses of the costs and lag-time of corporate legal work. This software-based change could affect services firms everywhere.  


Via jean lievens
Rob Duke's insight:

Technology continues to flatten the legal system and provide room in the shadow of the law for people to discover more efficient ad hoc methods of managing resources.  See the work of Elinor Ostrom and common pool resources for the theory base of why this works.

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The Learned Attitude That Makes Children More Anxious and Violent

The Learned Attitude That Makes Children More Anxious and Violent | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Comparison of children in 12 countries reveals the most aggressive, and why.

 

Children who expect others to be aggressive are more aggressive themselves, new international research concludes.

Professor Kenneth A. Dodge, who led the study, said:

“When a child infers that he or she is being threatened by someone else and makes an attribution that the other person is acting with hostile intent, then that child is likely to react with aggression.

This study shows that this pattern is universal in every one of the 12 cultural groups studied worldwide.”

The research compared 1,299 children in the US, Italy, Jordan, Kenya Thailand, China — 12 countries in all.

Children were given scenarios to read involving common situations that could be interpreted ambiguously.

- See more at: http://www.spring.org.uk/2015/07/the-learned-attitude-that-makes-children-more-anxious-and-violent.php#sthash.sOs6dCfy.dpuf


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Financial workers feel massively under pressure to compromise ethical ... - City A.M.

Financial workers feel massively under pressure to compromise ethical ... - City A.M. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A third of those in the finance sector feel under pressure from their employers to compromise their ethics, a  report by the Chartered Institute of Management

Via NANCY PETERS
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Why more police patrols will not reduce homicides: An evidence-based argument

Why more police patrols will not reduce homicides: An evidence-based argument | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In the wake of a number of riot-promoting, interracial killings emanating from urban officers, resulting in the deaths of young blacks, police administrators an
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What are your thoughts?  Does anyone remember which City Gotham was modeled after?  Something happened there because it's not Gotham today....

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Rob Duke's comment, July 26, 1:28 AM
Kelling's Kansas City Patrol study has always had questionable methodology. For instance, no officer was assigned to patrol these blocks, but all the blocks around were patrolled and officers were allowed to drive through the areas whenever they wanted. So, we found no differences, but I'm not sure there was any less patrol. Also, why no replication? Well, try getting it through the research ethics panel at your university's Institution Resource Board (IRB). IRB will likely have a big problem with the fact that you're not going to provide protection that everyone else gets.
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Being Brad ain't bad

Being Brad ain't bad | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IS YOUR name holding you back from a life of riches? It sounds like something out of a terrible infomercial, but a recent paper* suggests that changing your name...
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Louisiana theater gunman known as angry man with radical views

Louisiana theater gunman known as angry man with radical views | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
For decades before he opened fire in a Louisiana movie theater and killed two people, John Russell Houser was known as a man prone to anger, a loudmouth provocateur never afraid to share his opinion.
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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 25, 8:05 PM
This guy seems like a complete nut job, and everyone around him knew it. Shootings in public places has now become the norm. I think we don't want to go as far as labeling someone as being mentally crazy, but how are we supposed to protect the public. We are so afraid of terrorists from different countries, where the real problem right now is those who live on our own soil and decide they want to shoot up movie theaters or elementary schools. We need to take care of our own before we try and take care of those in other countries. This kind of heinous act will happen again and again. Gun control is not going to stop this, we need to find a way to control the mentally ill/unstable ones.
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Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong

Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What really causes addiction -- to everything from cocaine to smart-phones? And how can we overcome it? Johann Hari has seen our current methods fail firsthand, as he has watched loved ones struggle to manage their addictions. He started to wonder why we treat addicts the way we do -- and if there might be a better way. As he shares in this deeply personal talk, his questions took him around the world, and unearthed some surprising and hopeful ways of thinking about an age-old problem.
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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, July 25, 8:28 PM
This article really hit home, as I have personally dealt with a family member who suffers from addiction. I wish I could've heard this Ted Talk 10 years ago, because I believe I would've handled situations differently. When dealing with someone who has an addiction it's hard to not give up on them because it is a very frustrating situation to be put in, especially at the age of 12. This video gives great insight on how we need to reconnect, not only with our loved ones but as a society. Punishment isn't necessarily always the right solution, and I think it would be interesting if the United States could adopt ideas from Portugal, and how that would effect our society.
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Spilling the beans

Spilling the beans | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Some estimates suggest the results of half of clinical trials are never published. These missing data have, over several decades, systematically distorted perceptions of the efficacy of drugs, devices and even surgical procedures. And that misperception has sometimes harmed patients.

In America, where most of the world’s drugs first receive approval, the law was changed in 2007 to try to deal with this problem. Trials, with the exception of early safety evaluations, are supposed to be registered on a website, clinicaltrials.gov. Then, within a year of the completion of data collection, their results are supposed to follow suit. That, at least, is the theory. Practice seems different.
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