Criminology and Economic Theory
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Apex Predators Eat Hostess Twinkies

Apex Predators Eat Hostess Twinkies | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Is this White Collar Crime?

Labor, in Hostess' case, is not making extravagant demands on the company. It is not insisting on a shorter work week, or a larger benefits package, or some huge increase in pay or perquisites. No. Indeed, this is the very opposite of the truth.

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Central California detective charged in colleague's death

Central California detective charged in colleague's death | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Prosecutors have filed criminal charges against a sheriff's detective in Central California accused of killing his colleague in what authorities had initially called a tragic and accidental shooting, officials said.

Fresno County Sheriff's Sgt. Rod Lucas died in October while talking with a detective about how to carry their backup weapons.

A gun fired, striking 46-year-old Lucas in the chest, causing him to drop to the ground.

Detective Jared Mullis was charged Friday with felony involuntary manslaughter, the Fresno County District Attorney's Office said.


In court papers, prosecutors say Mullis killed Lucas without malice, but the killing was unlawful because he failed to use "due caution and circumspection." The charge includes a weapons enhancement because Mullis used his firearm, which means he may face a longer sentence if convicted.

Mullis' defense attorney Roger Wilson said Monday that his client could spend up to 14 years in state prison. Wilson said that was excessive because Mullis admired Lucas and the shooting was accidental.

"Clearly it was not a criminal act," he said, adding concern for the potential long prison sentence. "It says not only do we want to punish you, we want to punish you a lot."

Fresno County Assistant District Attorney Blake Gunderson declined to comment on the case.
Rob Duke's insight:
Another bizarre WCC case....I worked in Fresno county and all these agencies were very professional.
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Lawyer who coaxed bikers to be his bounty hunters could lose licence

Lawyer who coaxed bikers to be his bounty hunters could lose licence | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A suspended Toronto lawyer who threatened to “blow a hole through the brain” of a California prosecutor and coaxed two rival biker gangs to act as his bounty hunters could lose his licence on Tuesday morning.

Joel A. Sumner “embarked on a campaign of vigilante justice” against San Bernardino District Attorney John Kochis and solicited Hells Angels and Devils Diciples gang members to bust him, and if he resisted, to kill him, said lawyer Nader Hasan, acting as the Law Society discipline counsel.

Sumner described Kochis as a “f---ing piece of s--t motherf---er, gangster, tyrant and extortionist,” and vowed to “put two shots in his head” if he resisted arrest, the Law Society of Upper Canada hearing panel heard Monday.

The panel concluded Sumner had committed professional misconduct. A penalty hearing will be held Tuesday morning. Sumner, who was disbarred in Calfornia in 2012, could face a similar fate here.

“I had never received this type of email from anybody, let alone an attorney,” said Kochis, who spent more than 30 years prosecuting serial killers, gangsters, rapists and robbers.

Kochis said he put killers on death row and never received the hateful messages Sumner sent him.

Kochis’ wife was threatened with forced sodomy in one disturbing email, said Kochis.

Sumner, 40, is facing criminal charges for uttering threats both in Toronto and in California.

Sumner, who grew up in Toronto but became a California lawyer in 2006, worked as a tax lawyer for one year and later moved to New York before returning to Toronto in 2009. He passed the Ontario bar in 2012 and worked by himself here until 2016 when his licence was suspended due to these startling allegations.

The dispute arose from domestic allegations involving Sumner and his roommate in 2007. Those charges were dismissed in early 2008 (in exchange for a $300 charitable donation to a shelter).

Kochis only worked with Sumner and his lawyer on a declaration of Sumner’s factual innocence.

Sumner became enraged over the charitable donation and for several years through the spring of 2016, sent bizarre e-mails and messages to Kochis and the Law Society prosecutor’s office.

The panel heard an audiotaped exchange that Sumner had with a California Sheriff’s office operator in which he exhorted them in an hysterical profanity-laced tirade to arrest Kochis.

“Are you okay?” the operator asked Sumner, who snapped, “F--- you.” When she asked if he’d leave his name and address, he hung up.

Sumner, who never showed up for Monday’s hearing, was expected to represent himself.
Rob Duke's insight:
This is a bizarre WCC case....
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UCI marijuana study finds increased crime rates following L.A. pot dispensary closures

UCI marijuana study finds increased crime rates following L.A. pot dispensary closures | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A new study co-written by a UC Irvine business professor has found no correlation between marijuana dispensaries and increased crime rates near them.
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Trial evidence kept for years after convictions

Trial evidence kept for years after convictions | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SIOUX CITY | On Friday, District Judge Jeffrey Poulson sentenced Rogelio Morales to 50 years in prison.
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Iran judiciary detains President Rouhani's brother in corruption case

Iran judiciary detains President Rouhani's brother in corruption case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Iranian authorities have detained President Hassan Rouhani's brother, the judiciary spokesman said on Sunday, in a corruption case that the president's supporters say is politically motivated.
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Stanley Kreft's comment, July 24, 2:05 AM
This article has a close relation to this weeks Unit in that this deals with state crime and political corruption. It is not always the deprived and poor who commit crimes. It essentially could be anyone, in this case it is the wealthy and powerful. Who usually commit crimes to attain more wealth and power and keep themselves in the status quo.
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These Are The 10 Most Ghetto Cities In California

These Are The 10 Most Ghetto Cities In California | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
We used science and data to analyze which cities in CA are ghetto central.
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DS's curator insight, July 16, 8:33 PM

How can the Capital of California, Sacramento be ranked "more ghetto" than Stockton, or Compton? This is not a Scholarly, peer reviewed journal article. published by www.roadsnacks.net infotainment. Nick James, needs to conduct Research prior to posting Results.  "Science & Data" Yeah Right!

Austin Thomas's comment, July 22, 10:56 PM
This is a really good example of the social disorganization theory. These cities are "ghetto" and because of that there is heavy crime among other things. People who reside in these areas grow up around these values and this plays a role in how they grow up and the choices they make. There is not much opportunity in these places to really chase dreams because of the crime and other things.
Anna Givens's comment, July 24, 2:32 AM
I like this article for a few different reasons. For one, I think that a lot of people who are not from the West coast believe that California is an all glorious state where rich, beautiful people roam on the beautiful beaches and shop on Rodeo drive while order cupcakes through atm-like machines. I am from the North East and I never knew that in places like Los Angeles there are ghettos and very dangerous areas and people. Although, LA didn’t make a list I think this is informative to know that even in a state where most celebrities reside there is an ugly side to it too. The criteria they used to rank these ghetto neighborhoods or cities was based on the income levels, crime rates, high school graduation rates, number of drug stores and more.
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The ex-Chicago cop at the center of the controversy over crime-prediction technology

The ex-Chicago cop at the center of the controversy over crime-prediction technology | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There's a story Brett Goldstein likes to tell. It starts on a Friday night in 2010 with him sitting in a darkened Crown Victoria on a Chicago street, poring over maps. Goldstein was a commander at the Chicago Police Department, in charge of a small unit using data analysis to predict where certain types of crimes were likely to occur at any time. Earlier that day, his computer models forecast a heightened probability of violence on a particular South Side block. Now that he and his partner were there, Goldstein was doubting himself.

"It didn't look like it should be a target for a shooting," he recalled. "The houses looked great. Everything was well manicured. You expect, if you're in this neighborhood, you're looking for abandoned buildings, you're looking for people selling dope. I saw none of that."

Still, they staked it out. Goldstein's wife had just given birth to their second child, and he was exhausted after a day in the office. He started to doze off. Goldstein's partner argued that the data must be wrong. At 11 p.m., they left.

Several hours later, Goldstein woke up to the sound of his BlackBerry buzzing. There had been a shooting—on the block where he'd been camped out. "This sticks with me because we thought we shouldn't be there, but the computer thought we should be there," said Goldstein. He took the near-miss as vindication of his vision for the future of law enforcement. "I do believe in a policeman's gut. But I also believe in augmenting his or her gut," he said.
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DS's comment, July 16, 7:57 PM
Interesting article, predictive policing uses an algorithm to pinpoint high crime areas. Predicting the type of crime likely to occur is evidence of real progress.
DS's curator insight, July 16, 8:04 PM

Interesting article. Predictive Policing uses an algorithm to pinpoint high crime areas. Calling the time, or type of crime, that is likely to occur now that is evidence of progress. 

Stanley Kreft's comment, July 17, 1:02 AM
This could be very promising new technology and a giant step for criminology. To be able to predict where and reasonably when a crime is going to accuse should definitely help raise the closer rate of many crimes.i wonder if by the police relocating to the predicted crime areas, will cause a rise in the areas they would be operating had they not relocateddue to the predictions?
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Former Colorado sheriff acquitted of 3 of 7 counts

Former Colorado sheriff acquitted of 3 of 7 counts | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Jurors found former El Paso County sheriff Terry Maketa not guilty of witness tampering, conspiracy to commit witness tampering and official misconduct. The former lawman was accused of trying to undermine the credibility of three deputies and threatening to terminate a $5.3 million contract with the jail's health provider if it did not fire an employee who refused to support then-Undersheriff Paula Presley's candidacy to succeed him. Prosecutors said he abused his power during his turbulent third term in office, and he wanted to damage political rivals and destroy the careers of deputies and others who had crossed him.
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Federal prosecutors say they will seek a new trial for Sheldon Silver

Federal prosecutors say they will seek a new trial for Sheldon Silver | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Federal prosecutors said they will seek a new trial for Sheldon Silver, the longtime speaker of the New York State Assembly whose 2015 conviction on bribery was vacated Thursday by an appellate court.

The Second Circuit of the Court of Appeals ruled that instructions to the jury did not comport with a subsequent Supreme Court decision in the case against former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell. As such, the appellate judges ruled, “it is not clear beyond a reasonable doubt that a rational jury would have reached the same conclusion if properly instructed, as is required by law for the verdict to stand.”
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Stanley Kreft's comment, July 24, 2:24 AM
Yet another case of an elected official abusing their power. In this case the evidence and motive seems to support the reason as being to retain power and to increase wealth. Silver had a long history in the government system and apparently was abusing that power for a long time.
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What we know about the man who confessed to killing 4 in Pa.

What we know about the man who confessed to killing 4 in Pa. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
What we know about the man who confessed to killing 4 in Pa.
Rob Duke's insight:
First time or just the first one we know about?  The suspect is pretty young, though....
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Anna Givens's comment, July 24, 2:40 AM
I have been following this story since it aired about two weeks ago. It is so shocking to read. Not only that but Cosmo has told the FBI that he has killed two others before these four murders as well. I read that this was being investigated and police were looking into unresolved missing person cases. It also seemed to be motivated by drugs. In his accounts, all of the murders took place while there were dealings of marijuana. Also, I am really curious about where these murders took place, his family life and more. This farm where he killed and buried the bodies- was this his families property? Every article that I read makes no mention of this. His family also has not come forward with any kind of statement but they posted his one million dollar bail for him- in cash. This article is the first article I have read that mentions he might have been mentally ill which stems from an ATV accident he has months prior to the murders. How was he not receiving treatment..follow ups…anything? I am very interested in following this case and see what happens. What a tragedy for this town and the families on all these young men. I hope that justice is served.
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Virginia executes 'delusional' William Morva for 2006 killings

Virginia executes 'delusional' William Morva for 2006 killings | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
William Morva was pronounced dead at 9:15 p.m. His lawyers said the jury that sentenced him wasn't told he had a delusional disorder.
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Laura Lee Smith's comment, July 12, 5:09 PM
If it is true jury members were not informed he had a delusional disorder isn't that a failure on the defense's team? Their job is to provide not only information related to the crime but the mental state of their defendant! If a potential defense could have been mounted related to this delusional disorder I think they would have explored that, this seems late at best and weakly justified.
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Attorney: Illinois kidnapping suspect deserves fair hearing

Attorney: Illinois kidnapping suspect deserves fair hearing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The defense attorney for a man accused of kidnapping a University of Illinois scholar from China says his client deserves the "presumption of innocence."

Tom Bruno represents 28-year-old Brendt Christensen, who is accused of kidnapping 26-year-old Yingying Zhang and is jailed pending trial. Authorities believe she's dead, although her body hasn't been found. Christensen was arrested Friday.

Bruno said Thursday that he doesn't think "a negative inference" can be made from prosecutors' statements that Christensen marched in a vigil for Zhang a day before he was arrested.

Prosecutors also say Christensen spoke about how Zhang fought and resisted, and about what makes an ideal victim. Prosecutors haven't given details about to whom Christensen made the statements. Bruno said without a source it's hard to judge whether the statements are reliable.
Rob Duke's insight:
Profilers will tell you to watch the vigil crowds because often the killer will be there or will be driving by....
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Anna Givens's comment, July 13, 3:31 PM
I had to pull up another article to read the background of this story. This aches my heart. I hope that he either starts talking more to police because I read that the FBI does have him an audio saying that he did admit to kidnapping her and holding her against her will. Wonder what the motive around this story is. Did they have courses together? Was she at the wrong place at the wrong time? Was he stalking her for some time ( she had been in the US for 2 months when this occurred). Your comment was also interesting in that profile tell you to watch vigils because often time the offenders are there. I have read about this many times before- more famously in the case of Ariel Castro who went to vigils for the missing women he held for years in his home but also went and conducted search groups for them- all while they were tied up in his home!
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111 terminally ill patients took their own lives in first 6 months of California right-to-die law

111 terminally ill patients took their own lives in first 6 months of California right-to-die law | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California health officials released data on the first year of the End of Life Option Act, which allows terminally ill Californians to request lethal prescriptions from their doctors.
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Anna Givens's comment, July 13, 3:42 PM
Interesting. I am unsure how I feel about this. I read about this a few years ago when a women made it public she was going to take her pills. She had an extravagant party for a week with all her close friends and family and had a specific day at the end that she was going to take the pills surrounded by everyone. It was in this link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2016/08/16/a-terminally-ill-woman-had-one-rule-at-her-end-of-life-party-no-crying/?utm_term=.00f6e5fbe9f1 it was interesting to read about her story. Death by dignity also brings confusion to me. Some life insurances will not pay out if the policy holder commits suicide. I wonder how this death is pronounced in these cases.
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Journalists shouldn’t have to testify in Colonies case, attorney says

Journalists shouldn’t have to testify in Colonies case, attorney says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The end of the prosecution’s case in the San Bernardino County Colonies corruption trial on June 29 also ended the possibility of journalists who covered the case from being called to testify.

Eleven subpoenas to journalists were issued, an unprecedented number for a single case, according to attorney Duffy Carolan, who represented the reporters and one Southern California News Group executive.

On Jan. 17, Jeff Horwitz, a former reporter for The Sun, and Mason Stockstill, a former Inland Valley Daily Bulletin reporter, admitted to the published quotes they had reported in their stories. Attorneys for the prosecution and defense stipulated, and the quotes were entered into the trial record. Neither were put on the witness stand.

During the same hearing, Judge Michael A. Smith declined to quash any of the subpoenas. A few journalists were released in the early part of the trial, but in the end none who remained on standby were called by the prosecution.

“This is a fantastic outcome for what could have been a significant blow to press freedoms,” Carolan said in an emailed statement. The journalists contended the subpoenas violated California’s Reporter Shield Law, which grants contempt immunity from being forced to testify about unpublished material, or disclosing sources.

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Immediate jail for money laundering South Korean earthquake scientist? - MyNewsLA.com

Immediate jail for money laundering South Korean earthquake scientist? - MyNewsLA.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles federal judge will decide Thursday  if the former director of South Korea’s Earthquake Research Center should be jailed prior to being sentenced in October for money laundering.

Heon-Cheol Chi, 59, of South Korea, was convicted late Monday of using a Southern California bank account to launder bribes he received from two seismological companies, including one based in Pasadena. The offense carries a possible sentence of up to 10 years in federal prison.

The jury that issued the single guilty verdict was unable to reach a unanimous decision on five other money laundering charges. According to evidence presented at trial, Chi laundered funds that were the proceeds of bribes he accepted in violation of South Korea law.
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Man convicted of massive Ponzi scheme among 30 locals who could be paroled under Prop. 57

James Stanley Koenig wasn’t supposed to be eligible for parole for 32 more years.

Throughout his lengthy trial and sentencing, Koenig — convicted of 35 felonies in connection with swindling investors out an estimated $250 million through a complex Ponzi scheme — never admitted guilt. 

Koenig owned Asset Real Estate and Investment Co. (AREI), a now-insolvent property acquisition firm. He also owned Oakdale Heights Management Corp., a firm that managed two dozen senior living centers that AREI had purchased in nearly a half-dozen states. But AREI was a financial failure by May 2007, unable to pay creditors and investors and closed that next month.

Koenig is now sitting in Folsom State Prison on a 43-year term. He said at his emotionally charged 2013 sentencing he would have taken a 10-year prison deal offered to him if he could have changed things.

Now the 64-year-old Koenig may have a shot at getting out of prison sooner than originally expected.
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Family of Freddie Farah gives hope to other cold case victims

Family of Freddie Farah gives hope to other cold case victims | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. – It was a cold case that lasted 43 years. The family of Freddie Farah got some relief in May when the man suspected of killing him at a Jacksonville grocery store was arrested. Now, Farah's family is trying to help families of other cold case victims by raising money for the non-profit, Project Cold Case.
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The Best List Of Alaska Cities

A comprehensive list of all 23 cities and places in Alaska. Browse special categories of cities only found on HomeSnacks.
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Jenna's comment, July 17, 4:04 PM
I thought it was funny how Wasilla was listed as the most redneck city in Alaska but Kotzebue was listed as the most dangerous. Kodiak was listed as the second most dangerous and it makes me wonder why. They took data from the UCR and analyzed property and violent crime reports. There must be a lot of hidden crimes that they don't want the visitors to know about or is it just not that bad of a state to live in.
DS's curator insight, July 22, 5:18 AM

"A comprehensive list of all 23 cities and place in Alaska" huh...

Anna Givens's comment, July 24, 2:24 AM
This article was interesting to read. My family and I are new to Alaska and have only lived here a year so seeing how the different cities rank in different categories was fascinating and definitely informative. I was not aware that Fairbanks was in the top ten most dangerous cities in Alaska. These rankings were made up from analyzing the FBIs uniformed crime reports so it obviously is due to the violent crimes that have occurred here such as murders, robberies and rapes. I think this was a good, informative article- but also, the most redneck cities? How is a city redneck because of least amount of high school graduates and number of bars? I am sure that is supposed to be a comical category.
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Report: Nurse’s Opioid Abuse Caused Bacteria Outbreak in Wisconsin Hospital

Report: Nurse’s Opioid Abuse Caused Bacteria Outbreak in Wisconsin Hospital | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Investigators discovered the nurse was removing opioids from syringes and replacing them with a saline solution, causing the bacteria outbreak.
Rob Duke's insight:
Another WCC case....
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Stanley Kreft's comment, July 17, 1:02 AM
This just goes to show how not all criminals come from deprived urban centers. A nurse earns a decent wage and has taken an oath to help people but due to her drug addictions broke the ethics of health care. This is why it is so hard to pin point a specific cause of crime.
Jenna's comment, July 17, 4:07 PM
This scares me because we are supposed to trust the health care system. It is amazing how there is crime in every place, even in places where the professionals get paid a lot of money to do their job. It makes me wonder what the best deterrence would be for these type of criminals.
Boan White's comment, July 21, 11:00 PM
Just 5 years in prison come on those 5 patients where lucky that all that happened was being infected by Serratia marcescens, which most likely would not have killed them, and not a more deadly virus and all because she wanted opioids. How did the hospital not see this before hand with the need for background checks and random drug tests.
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Fremont County Sheriff’s Office asks for public’s help identifying facial reconstruction figure

Fremont County Sheriff’s Office asks for public’s help identifying facial reconstruction figure | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Coroner's Office is still trying to identify the body of a hiker found in September.
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Washington man pleads guilty to defrauding Alaskans out of $2.7M

He asked for money to pay medical bills but spent it at the casino, prosecutors say.
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Stanley Kreft's comment, July 17, 1:10 AM
This case is very intriguing in that the people continued to give money to the man despite going into severe debt and forecloses. Meanwhile the criminal continued to deceive people just to feed his addiction. Addiction is one of the largest contributors to crime i believe, if there was a solid way to break addiction crime rates would drastically fall.
Boan White's comment, July 21, 10:53 PM
All I have to say is he was a truly despicable man, and that none of his victims will see a dime.
DS's curator insight, July 22, 5:09 AM

Interesting article, adn.com subscribers are well-informed readers. 19 charges, the kind of article one declines to comment on. Wire fraud and Laundering Monetary Instruments are defined by the US Code. The scheme shows that White collar crimes are not victim-less crimes. The Case is ongoing... 

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US charging 412 in health fraud schemes worth $1.3 billion

US charging 412 in health fraud schemes worth $1.3 billion | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
US charging 412 in health fraud schemes worth $1.3 billion
Rob Duke's insight:
Some insight into White Collar Crimes...
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Stanley Kreft's comment, July 24, 2:13 AM
This is another case of wealthy individuals committing crime. In this case as in most it was for monetary gain and attempting to achieve that next tier if social status. As it was discussed in this chapter that however their crimes affect thee same amount of people as drug dealers on the streets they will probably get off with a fine and have restrictions on being able to treat medicare patients in the future. Where as a drug dealer on the street providing the same drugs to the same people would wind up in prison for a number of years.
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Cold case cracked? Police arrest suspect in teen girl's 2000 murder

Cold case cracked? Police arrest suspect in teen girl's 2000 murder | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Surete du Quebec arrested a suspect Thursday in connection with the murder of 17-year-old Rosianna Poucachiche—a case that’s remained cold for the last 17 years.
The suspect, a 33-year-old man from the Outaouais region, was arrested at a hunting outpost just south of Lac Rapide. Police say that he fled into the forest on foot briefly before being captured.
On October 10, 2000, Poucachiche was found beaten to death in bed at the home she shared with her father on the Algonquin reserve.
At the time, the cause of death was stated to be significant head trauma.
A spokesperson for the SQ said that the lead came after new DNA tests were performed this spring.
Although the suspect was investigated at the time of the murder and his house was searched by police – preliminary DNA testing could not link him to the crime.
At the time, Poucachiche’s family criticized the SQ’s handling of the case, specifically the absence of leads in the years following her murder.
The connection between the suspect and the victim was not disclosed by police. Officials say they knew each other from the community.
Some reports indicate that the suspect’s name has not been released because he was a minor at the time of the murder.
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Boan White's comment, July 12, 1:56 AM
I am glad that there are some cold cases that get solved, I feel that to often they are simply left to gather dust, thank you advances in forensic science.
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New forensics procedures at Contra Costa County Crime Lab speed results

New forensics procedures at Contra Costa County Crime Lab speed results | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
MARTINEZ — The drama, cutting-edge science and police work that keeps “CSI” fans glued to their TVs are happening in real life at the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Department Crime Lab.…
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Boan White's comment, July 12, 2:23 AM
wow just wow looks like those CSI shows are becoming more of a reality.
Jenna's comment, July 17, 4:09 PM
Now that is just cool. Science is making it even faster and easier to solve crimes and mysteries. Soon there will be no need for Scooby Doo and his gang, just pure science to find the culprits.
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FBI indicts 14 connected to Mexican Mafia-ordered attacks in LA county jails

FBI indicts 14 connected to Mexican Mafia-ordered attacks in LA county jails | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Following an extensive investigation by local and federal agents, several Mexican Mafia members and associates were indicted in connection with a series of violent jail attacks on inmates last year, FBI officials announced Friday.“In one
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DS's curator insight, July 5, 7:12 PM

The Safe Streets Task Force is a concerted law enforcement effort, involving several different law enforcement agencies. This article was informs of police work involving collective efficacy. The scenario is descriptive of conduct norms/clash, with sub-cultural values. Sutherland, differential association theory. In our civilized society, prisoners who have shown a commitment to conformity deserve some protection.

Boan White's comment, July 21, 10:58 PM
Good only the police for showing that good police work, determination, and a little luck can yield great results.