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California Man Attempts to Snatch Purse While Dressed as Spiderman

California Man Attempts to Snatch Purse While Dressed as Spiderman | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
No spider sense, or any sense at all. Complex.com: The original buyer's guide for men.
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biggamevince's comment, December 12, 2012 9:02 PM
A 22-year-old California man was arrested for attempting to snatch a woman's purse while "disguised" as Spiderman. The woman had just parked her car and noticed the man staring at her. He then ordered her to hand over her purse. The woman ran away screaming for help when she saw what she thought to be a gun, but turned out to be a metal pipe. Police later apprehended him. From the photo it looks like this person has a psychological issue. The article does not give enough information of the motive. It seems like this case is just another idiot trying to see if he can get away with a crime and thinks that a Spiderman disguise would aid his escape. He was charged with attempted robbery.

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Prop. 47 floods courts with pleas for resentencing and records purges

Prop. 47 floods courts with pleas for resentencing and records purges | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Proposition 47, a sweeping ballot measure that reduced penalties for certain crimes, has already led to the release of hundreds of jail and prison inmates statewide and inundated courts with scores of applications from people who want their records cleansed of felonies.
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A lack of will power

A lack of will power | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IN RECENT weeks China’s leaders have been talking up the need to enhance the rule of law. Their aim is to strengthen the Communist Party’s grip on power while at...
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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, November 26, 8:47 AM
This example about China and their lack of the power is horrible. I think it is more of a case with abusing power then the lack of it. There is an example in the article about a girl that got left with nothing, after her parents died. Government took everything from that girl leaving her on the streets. I lived in Chia for a year and am familiar with their laws and situation in the country. Most of the people over there are surviving versus people in US who are living and enjoying their lives.
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Emotional abuse 'set to become a criminal offence'

Emotional abuse 'set to become a criminal offence' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Theresa May is expected to unveil plans to make psychological and emotional abuse a criminal offence with a lengthy prison term, according to reports.

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Joshua Matheny's comment, November 25, 3:30 PM
This is really interesting, I'm just not sure how the laws will apply to emotional abuse. It seems to me that a "boy who cried wolf" scenario might be involved where police cannot view an actual incident through physical damage that might have taken place but instead have to rely on an account that is taken from someone who believes they have been emotionally abused. As this situation progresses it will be interesting to see what objectively comes out of it, and what kind of work they can do to make sure that justice is being done and not being overused when people simply get into heated arguments and believe they have been "emotionally abused". A line needs to draw as to where this abuse is and it needs to have other factors of involvement before it becomes an actual law. I like the idea, I just hope that it isn't abused by certain people, as we have already seen some domestic abuse can be.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, November 26, 8:47 AM
First of all, I think that it is really hard to solve domestic violence cases. There is no proof of what happened in the house, plus one of the partners will be lying and most of the time both will be complaining about each other. Of course there are cases when it’s is clearly visible that who needs to get charges and who needs to be protected, but I think those cases are hard to solve. With that said, if the wrong person will get locked up and charge with a criminal offence, will that be right? I don’t think that it is a right decision to set all the DV as a criminal offences. I think that each and every case should be looked at differently and get charges accordingly.
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5-foot-tall ‘Robocops’ start patrolling Silicon Valley

5-foot-tall ‘Robocops’ start patrolling Silicon Valley | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Autonomous “Robocop”-style robots, equipped with microphones, speakers, cameras, laser scanners and sensors, have started to guard Silicon Valley.
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Joshua Matheny's comment, November 25, 3:37 PM
This is awesome! I really think this will help these communities, because they are not suspect robots, they would just sit there while things are happening and the fact that they can geotag and even take pictures of vehicles, plates, and people involved in situations makes them so useful to law enforcement officers who may be getting in on the end of a break-in without a suspect in the area. I also really liked the part at the end of the article where they said that people didn't really understood their function but they were very friendly towards them, even hugging them. Haha! That's excellent, I guess these aren't the "dead or alive you're coming with me" type robocops we thought we would be getting in the future...
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Restorative Justice: Helping inmates transition to freedom - YouTube

Helping inmates transition to freedom while working toward a system that reduces incarceration. That's putting beliefs into action. That's Church. Learn more...
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Missouri teen gets 10-year sentence in school beating

Missouri teen gets 10-year sentence in school beating | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A violent teenager ran out of second chances in a Missouri courtroom.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 23, 3:59 AM
So Im guessing he got waived straight to adult court. The article did not go into detail as far as the child's criminal history, but Im guessing since he was already at a school for delinquents he was given many chances. You really have to wonder what goes through some of these young kids minds to think that its ok to attack a teacher like this? I don't think a prison sentence is going to help this though. He will be out in five years or so, learn more criminal behavior and now have this on his record. He hurt two peoples lives that day, his teacher and his own. He's a casualty in the Juvenile system who will now only see the adult side of the law, where they don't like to give out second chances.
Joshua Matheny's comment, November 25, 4:04 PM
I'm right there with Elizabeth, it doesn't really give us the information we need to know, but from what I can tell he has probably had a lot of issues with the law and may have been on his last strike so to speak. For the sake of protecting others I think he needs to go to jail. Hopefully the experience will be eye-opening for him in a way that he may right his wrongs so to speak. Without knowing his previous history I cannot say if I think this punishment was just or not, but I do think eventually you need to be punished for the wrongs you have committed. He surely won't serve out a full sentence, and I hope that time in prison helps him to right his wrongs, as it does some people. Or it may in fact make the situation worse.
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, November 26, 8:47 AM
This case is pretty straight forward. Good thing that they cameras in the room which leaves all the question answered. Also, I think the comment that reporter made is very accurate. He said that the teen who is acting like a man needs to be charged as a man. What was really surprising is that even teen’s mother said that he needs to be isolated.
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Here's Why You Should Never Play-or Let Your Kids Play-Grand Theft Auto -

Here's Why You Should Never Play-or Let Your Kids Play-Grand Theft Auto - | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mary Poust discusses the video game, Grand Theft Auto, whose latest 'upgrade' allows kids to have sex with and kill prostitutes, and concludes that we should not be playing or supporting these games.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 22, 3:03 AM

The heading says it, don't let your kids play the game. There are barriers put in place to prevent kids from owning this game, and there are warnings on it as well. Will they still get their hands on it yes? Games like these desensitize children to violence and sex. This is an excessive example of a game containing all the vices kids shouldn't be subject to at a young age. However articles like this just entice that 10-14 year old kid to push the red button and play that game he/or she should not. This is where the parent comes in and needs to monitor and make sure the kid doesn't play the game. If they let their child play the game than they have to answer to the outcome and the results of kids getting these messages sent to their sponge brains. The answer is not what Al Gores wife did back in the day with Music, where she wanted to ban everything, instead put “parental advisory” stickers on them, and then all she did was make people buy them twice as much as before. You cant stop these things from being made, but you can stop them from being owned in your home.
Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 22, 4:47 PM
I agree that this game isn't for children as quite a few of the modern war and violence games are also not acceptable for kids. I understand this woman linking the violence she sees in this game and realizing children are not the ones who should be absorbing that kind of message. I also think the show Game of Thrones and Sons of Anarchy are not kid friendly and show a very violent side of life. However, these games and these shows will continue to be made and continue to be seen by kids who are not supervised. Online porn and graphic You Tube videos also are not kid friendly and readily accessible. The best thing all parents should do is help guide their kids into good decisions and keep tabs on what they are watching.
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Calif. man who killed co-worker, cut out heart released

Calif. man who killed co-worker, cut out heart released | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Associated Press FRESNO, Calif. — A Fresno man who stabbed his co-worker dozens of times in 1984 and then cut out the man's heart and put it in his jacket pocket has been released from prison despite objections from Gov. Jerry Brown. Theodore LeLeaux Jr. was sentenced
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Brandon Jensen's comment, November 21, 6:19 PM
wow that is a pretty interesting decision from the judge. Stabbing someone 77 times and cutting their heart out is pretty violent but I guess that was 30ish year ago, a lot can happen during that time.
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Hands-on lessons in accident investigation

Hands-on lessons in accident investigation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
CQUNIVERSITY Bachelor of Accident Forensics students are receiving hands-on training thanks to the university’s new purpose-built crash lab.

Via Vonny~, Tioni Kolo Toolkit
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Criminal Justice News: U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitive’s Skull Found by Family Dog

Criminal Justice News: U.S. Marshals 15 Most Wanted Fugitive’s Skull Found by Family Dog | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, November 20, 10:09 PM

I wonder what happened to the fugitive who escaped? That's crazy and what are the odds of that happening only a few miles away from where he broke out? I found it interesting that the man who found the skull with his dog was able to get such a good description of the mans hairline, type of haircut, and the mans ear. Forensics to me is fascinating.

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The Other Side of Suicide.

The Other Side of Suicide. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
That kind of resiliency took another character trait that many people assume victims of suicide lack---courage. She weathered the brutal blows of mental illness
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, November 20, 9:44 PM

This article actually brought tears to my eyes. We never know what someone is going through and sometimes we are quick to judge because we don't understand. I also think it's neat to hear a story about how a son who lost his innocence in losing his mother to suicide but had it replaced with perspective and understanding. He also had compassion after he saw her struggles more clear, mental illness is sad. I don't see suicide as weak I see it as sad and I feel life is crazy sometimes. Sometimes its better and okay to not understand.

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How the way we walk can increase risk of being mugged

How the way we walk can increase risk of being mugged | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The way we move can influence the likelihood of an attack by a stranger. The good news, though, is that altering it can reduce the chances of being targeted.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, November 20, 10:03 PM

This makes sense to me because you can tell a lot about a person by the way they carry themselves in their body language. (most times anyways) In a broad sense you can read if someone seems sneaky (maybe you can spot the attacker's body language by the way they carry their head while walking etc.) or dishonest, insecure and I also believe eye contact has a lot to do with a person and seeing if they are up to no good in a sense, I'd rather be the spotter than the one being spotted. In relation to this article, I spoke to someone awhile ago and they worked with abused children and woman and had to meet with the accused. In her years of training in this field she did speak about this topic that's discussed in this article that I found interesting. She said that vulnerable, insecure young girls are often an easy target, for example, if they are homeless on the streets and no family and older people. She said that people who hold themselves in confidence seems to be a deterrence to the attacker because the attacker sees your strong. They prey on what they see as weak.

 

Brandon Jensen's comment, November 21, 6:01 PM
I have actually read about this before a couple months ago, I found it rather interesting, something I have not really given much thought to but it makes sense. People do let a lot about themselves show when walking and apparently that can send the wrong message to a potential mugger.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 22, 3:43 AM
The article still doesn't tell me exactly how to walk to avoid being targeted? Other than your “energy” when you walk. I say the targeting comes down to how you are dressed, if you are alone, age, and sex. The walk I think is the last variable the the criminal looks at. Perhaps a rushed walk may be picked up by a criminal as a target but other than that its down to the other reasons. Body language is always being read by other people and it does say a lot about the person but emotions I think can control a persons walk.
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How young is too young?

How young is too young? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IN 1275 an English judge condemned a man for “ravishing” a girl aged under 12, the legal minimum for marriage at the time. Three centuries later the rape of a...
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Pleasure at another's misfortune is evident in children as young as two

Pleasure at another's misfortune is evident in children as young as two | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Even very young children will show signs of schadenfreude when an inequitable situation is rectified. Until now, researchers believed that children didn't develop such a sophisticated emotion until the age of seven, but a new study found evidence of schadenfreude in children as young as two.
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http://youtu.be/rX7wtNOkuHo

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When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victims

When The Media Treats White Suspects And Killers Better Than Black Victims | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
This pervasive and not-so-subtle media bias is right in front of your eyes....

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Extreme Wealth Is Bad for Everyone—Especially the Wealthy

Extreme Wealth Is Bad for Everyone—Especially the Wealthy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The filthy rich, writes Michael Lewis, are unhappy, unhelpful, and always wanting more.
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This is a fantastic article....

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The neuroscience of restorative justice

The neuroscience of restorative justice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Daniel Reisel studies the brains of criminal psychopaths (and mice). And he asks a big question: Instead of warehousing these criminals, shouldn’t we be using what we know about the brain to help them rehabilitate? Put another way: If the brain can grow new neural pathways after an injury … could we help the brain re-grow morality?
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Restorative justice is viable alternative

Restorative justice is viable alternative | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Last week I talked about two burglary incidents. The first was my own. Although the juvenile offender was caught, the only participation I had in the entire juvenile justice procedure was when I received a restitution check for $250 in the mail. I was never given the opportunity to attend any court hearings or confront the boy or to deal with the psychological scars left by the burglary.
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Put Down The Phone, You’re Under Arrest: Turning The Table On Debt Collection Criminals

Put Down The Phone, You’re Under Arrest: Turning The Table On Debt Collection Criminals | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“[T]his has become something of an epidemic.”

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Tribes work to create sex offender registers

Tribes work to create sex offender registers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 22, 2:44 AM
This is something I didn't really consider because I assumed it was already something that would be implemented. I think this is really needed for those on tribal land. They already have a problem with child abuse and domestics, I'm sure that sex offenders can hide under the radar within the communities without such laws. Communication should be there between law enforcement and tribes to inform them of potential sex offenders within the communities. I see though at the same time it could be hard because some tribes like to keep their affairs very private and think no out side law should concern themselves with tribal matters. Hopefully they can use some of that casino funding and put it into a program to have a better idea of who is where.
Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 22, 4:29 PM
Interesting how Native tribes haven't been keeping track of sexual offenders in their neighborhoods. I would assume the tribes occupants would also want to know if their neighbor is a sexual predator or not. The government plays an interesting part in how they have given most rules and sovereignty to the tribes to handle yet by allowing this these communities can help keep sexual predators stay under the radar. Hopefully these communities are able to get in compliance with these registry lists and communities can be safer.
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Feds charge mining company and executives with criminal pollution in Southwest Alaska

Feds charge mining company and executives with criminal pollution in Southwest Alaska | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Australian-led mining company owned by an offshore corporation and five of its top officials and employees conspired to dump waste from a platinum mine into a Southwest Alaska salmon river, a federal indictment handed up Tuesday alleges.
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Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, November 23, 3:40 AM
They should be charged, and heavily fined, and they should also on top of this pay to fix any damaged that has been caused, pay for the scientist it will take to discover the effects of this stupidity. Its a shame, people of Alaska lively hood is put at stake by outside corporations who could care less because they are not the ones drinking or using this water. The salmon in Alaska has already taken a hit, this does not help. Alaska got screwed on Valdez, this folks need to be made an example of. The time frame that they were able to get away with it for so long needs to be fixed as well.

http://www.iflscience.com/environment/epa-barred-getting-advice-scientists
This article makes me think of this recent article I read where they don't want to take scientific advise.

“A bill passed through the US House of Representatives is designed to prevent qualified, independent scientists from advising the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). They will be replaced with industry affiliated choices, who may or may not have relevant scientific expertise, but whose paychecks benefit from telling the EPA what their employers want to hear.”
So more cases like this one in Alaska will happen unless the proper research and checks are done. In the meantime the environment will be destroyed by money hungry capitalist.
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Forensic Accident Reconstructions

I saw this and just had to post it. I know it's not as interesting as the real thing, but I just think it's cool enough to post.

Via Tioni Kolo Toolkit
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Rodney Ebersole's comment, November 19, 6:00 PM
Graphics like these really put accidents into perspective and must help authorities in figuring out what happened at an accident. Understanding how cars react the way they do at different speeds is very interesting.
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Turning them around

Turning them around | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
WREATHS of poppies were laid to commemorate Britain’s war dead on Remembrance Day. But days before, police arrested four men suspected of planning a terrorist...
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Is ‘Illegal Pete’s’ an offensive name for a restaurant chain? Was it always?

Is ‘Illegal Pete’s’ an offensive name for a restaurant chain? Was it always? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

The national debate over the use of the term “illegal immigrant” has fixed on an unlikely lightning rod: the liberal-minded, pro-immigrant owner of a Mexican restaurant chain in Colorado.


Via Tim Grant
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Tim Grant's curator insight, November 18, 8:16 AM

An interesting article via Krzysz Kredens on the impact of language change and offensiveness.

Kimberly Maddigan's comment, November 18, 8:22 PM
I think that these days people have become extremely sensitive about certain words and certain things in general. I don't really see the issue with this restaurant's name. The name means something to this restaurant owner and it has for a very long time. He doesn't mean it to be a racial or slur, or for it to be demeaning. In my opinion people need to stop thinking that everything is about them, because it really isn't. This restaurant name has nothing to do with illegal immigrants, yet they are the ones who are offended. It amazes me. There was a situation one time while I was working, where a customer told my boss she was going to have me deported back to Asia. It didn't hurt my feelings whatsoever, in fact I laughed at her stupidity and ignorance. Life is too short, to let little things like that upset you. You know where you are from, and whether or not you are an immigrant. I don't think these people should let these words hurt them, let alone a restaurant name.
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Wine & Bottles: A metaphor & a methodology for mainstreaming TJ, by David Wexler

Wine & Bottles:  A metaphor & a methodology for mainstreaming TJ,  by David Wexler | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In this new Blog, we hope to include very short pieces relating to the “mainstreaming” of therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) — that is, the use of TJ principles, practices, and techniques in the “ordin...
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