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Suddenly, Pot Is Legal in (Part of) the United States

Suddenly, Pot Is Legal in (Part of) the United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
While you were watching to see whether Romney or Obama won Ohio, both Colorado and Washington legalized marijuana for recreational use on Tuesday.
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Kiara's comment, November 12, 2012 6:28 PM
This didn't come as a huge shock to me. It's been a topic of discussion & debate for entirely too long, in my opinion. I don't have a straight forward opinion on whether I think its a good or a bad thing. I think that unintended consequences will result from the legalization of marijuana. I also know that it will greatly improve the economic issues, the major debt problem that the U.S. is dealing with. When I started reading this article, the first thing that came to mind was the fact that the Federal Government probably isn't on board with these states. This will likely cause a lot of issues because there are two different laws being implemented, one says yes & one says no. I foresee this being a huge issue among distributors of this substance. I just hope that people take this new "right" of theirs and deal with it responsibly where as not to affect people who don't want any part in it. I just hope that the government can come to an appropriate method of monitoring the growth, distribution and consumption of it. The end of the article stating that by the 22nd century, Americans will be buying a pack of joints makes me laugh. So far that they know it hasn't caused lung cancer...more power to them. Regardless of whether it's legal or not I won't personally run out to smoke a joint. Not for me! Good reading!!!
T Hall's comment, November 14, 2012 1:36 AM
I think the progression towards legalizing marijuana is a wise decision. If people want to smoke and put themselves at risk, they should be allowed to do so while others benefit from their choices. The high tax on marijuana would potentially give America the educational boost we so desperately need to give students a useful education. In addition, though there has been little research done on marijuana (I believe due to Federal regulations), marijuana is one of the “safer” drugs one may choose to use. If alcohol and tobacco, which are leading causes of deaths and may influence poor behavior, can be legal, what’s the problem with marijuana? From a utilitarian standpoint, legalizing this drug would bring about the greatest good for the greatest number in terms of revenue that could go towards education.
Mari Freitag's comment, November 19, 2012 12:19 AM
I'm pretty fascinated with the legal power struggle between the state and federal governments that this is creating. I expect that we'll see some monumental supreme court opinions come out of this in a few years, which will be very interesting to read. I think that the article does predict well that this movement is continuing to gain momentum. What worries me is that the federal government isn't going to give these states a "free pass" when it comes to the drug. I think that it would probably take a statement by President Obama on behalf of states' rights, but I doubt that's going to happen. This is going to create a huge industry in CO and WA, but also make interstate trafficking that much more of an issue. I suppose that this already happens with alcohol between wet, dry, and damp boroughs and counties. Overall, this will be an incredibly interesting legal battle to watch over the coming years.

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The wisdom of watchdogs

The wisdom of watchdogs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Art of Audit: Eight Remarkable Government Auditors on Stage. By Roel Janssen. Amsterdam University Press; 104 pages; $24.99 and £15.99. WHEN offices handle...
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How the South Skews America

How the South Skews America | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Every year the Fourth of July is marked by ringing affirmations of American exceptionalism. We are a special nation, uniquely founded on high ideals like freedom and equality. In practice, however, much of what sets the United States apart from other countries today is actually Southern exceptionalism. The United States would be much less exceptional...
Rob Duke's insight:

Every since Lot choice the cities on the plain and left Abraham to the hills, we're been fighting this urban vs. rural fight.  It's too simplistic to assign everything that's wrong with America to the South.

 

We'd be less violent? Really?  Have you checked out Chicago lately?

We'd be more tolerant?  Really?  Top 10 hate crime regions: Maine, Washington, Nevada, Connecticut, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Dakota, Michigan, and D.C.  Only 3 of these regions are in the South.

 

http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/most-shocking/10-u-s-states-most-plagued-by-hate-crimes/

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Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 6:55 PM
This debate about the confederate flag is really starting to get on my nerves a bit. It seems that we live in a country full whiny babies. I have absolutely no opinion whatsoever about the confederate flag. I understand its history but I could care less if someone chooses to fly it. I think that its a bit unpatriotic to fly a flag that once represented a severed United States. Anyways, people need to grow up. I saw a truck today with a Seattle Seahawks flag flying in the back.....well that flag offends me greatly, so I think we should ban it.
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NRA-ILA | Brady Campaign "A+" Politician Guilty of Weapons-Related Racketeering

NRA-ILA | Brady Campaign "A+" Politician Guilty of Weapons-Related Racketeering | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Established in 1975, the Institute for Legislative Action (ILA) is the "lobbying" arm of the National Rifle Association of America. ILA is responsible for preserving the right of all law-abiding individuals in the legislative, political, and legal arenas, to purchase, possess and use firearms for legitimate purposes as guaranteed by the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
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How about a little political corruption today for white collar crime....

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Thomas Piketty has wise words on German hypocrisy and how to solve the Greek debt crisis

“The history of public debt is full of irony,” he said. “It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.
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Police suggest drastic step for Anchorage home neighbors call magnet for crime

Police suggest drastic step for Anchorage home neighbors call magnet for crime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Anchorage Police Department has asked the city to deploy a drastic, rarely-used tool known as criminal abatement if things don't change. The city would go through a judicial process to seize the property from its owner.

The technique is used only in “exceptional circumstances,” said Gary Gilliam, head of the Anchorage Police Department’s Community Action Policing team. He couldn’t think of the last time it was used against a private homeowner.

“You don’t want the government to suddenly come in and take somebody’s property, like right now. There has to be due process. This is huge: You’re taking a man’s home from him.”

Fenner, a former municipal snowplow driver who retired after an on-the-job injury, denies his neighbors' claims. He says they have launched a campaign to harass him with “nonsense” calls to the police.

“I’m not trying to damage the neighborhood,” he said.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is a Problem Oriented Policing tool normally reserved for seedy motels, and crack houses....what do you think about it's use here?

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Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 7:33 PM
After reading this article, I am a bit shocked at the number of police calls to one single house. It's obvious that something has to be done, but I'm not sure that seizing his home is the right way to go. I think a force-sale would be more adequate. If he's forced to sell the house, then the new owners can bring respectability back to the property. The guy's defense is pretty pathetic. He honestly thinks that the neighborhood just hates him for no reason? With that much police activity, I would just force him to sell the house or have it seized if he doesn't agree to it.
Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 7:34 PM
A force sale would then make sure that he financially benefits from his investment.
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Woman Shot, Killed at SF Pier Reportedly Wasn't Intended Target

Woman Shot, Killed at SF Pier Reportedly Wasn't Intended Target | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police said there doesn't appear to be a connection between the suspect and victim, Kate Steinle.
Rob Duke's insight:

He was trying to shoot sea lions? WTH?

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Angela Perry's comment, July 6, 8:51 PM
This is truly a sad story and all because of some failed communication. First I want to know how Mr. Sanchez didn't know that he shot someone. Then to come back and say that you were shooting at sea lions. A sea lion? What in the world would you be trying to shoot at sea lions from a busy pier anyways. Deported 5 times and still made it back into the US. They should use this man to find out how he keeps making it back into the US and use this intell to stop further illegal immigrants from entering the US. I mean he has done it so many times i sure he could find his way back with his eyes closed. I understand that everyone wants to be an American and live the AMERICAN life but for crying out loud just do it the proper way. As for the miscommunication that went on, i think this is a common occurrence that goes on more so than not. Because if the communication was there mishaps like this would not be reported on like they are so often. One or two I can understand but the reporting of failed communication between agencies is not so few and far between. I do like how the Steinle family is trying not to dwell on the deportation of Mr Sanchez because they know it is not going to bring back their dear daughter Kate.
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Shalt or shalt not

Shalt or shalt not | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
But, some might ask, aren't the commandments so much part of the Western world's broad cultural heritage that they hardly count as an affirmation of one particular doctrinal viewpoint? In certain contexts, perhaps. For example, a frieze on the wall of America's Supreme Court shows some of the great law-givers of history, including the Roman emperor Justinian, Moses and Muhammad. They are presented as people who helped establish the principle that human societies must live by a clear, transparent and fairly applied set of rules; this does not imply that any one of them had a monopoly of truth.
Rob Duke's insight:

Ironic that the Supreme Court can have Moses and Mohammed on their wall, but a state court can't have the 10 commandments....

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Georgetown police create safe zones for Craigslist sales - The Boston Globe

Georgetown police create safe zones for Craigslist sales - The Boston Globe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Two designated “Online Safe Zones” located outside of the department’s headquarters are monitored by police cameras.
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Jay Fulk's comment, July 5, 7:27 PM
I actually really like this idea! I would feel much better knowing that my wife could meet someone outside of the police station, rather than our home. We sell things on craigslist sometimes, and I usually meet people at my office during the daytime. I feel like being in a public place during the middle of the day is perfectly safe. This just gives the seller and buyer more comfort with the transaction. I don't think that anyone should sell things at their home and in the evening. Those two things are recipes for disaster.
Rob Duke's comment, July 5, 7:38 PM
Yup. Millions of satisfied customers in eCommerce, but all it takes is one (and there've been enough incidents to make this a legitimate concern). This is an interesting idea, though, to shine some transparency on a quasi-legitimate marketplace. I think we're wise to figure out ways to tame these markets.
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Final certainty

Final certainty | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LAST year Brittany Maynard, a 29-year-old Californian, was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. Rather than let the illness take its dreadful course she moved to...
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Angela Perry's comment, July 6, 9:05 PM
I am so glad that Ms Brittany was able to make a choice about her life and not left in the hands of a doctor. I know that practicing doctors don't always get the answer right of how long you have to live but the flip side is they can say you are going to live this long and expire before the month end. I too know that I would like to go to a state that allows doctors to prescribe me a legal dose to take me out of my misery. I don't find this a selfish act in anyway because only the person with the illness knows what pain they are experiencing. So why should a doctor be able to say yay or nay to a terminal illness that you may no longer have the fight inside of you to keep on living like you are. I was really surprised to see how many other countries have adopted and how long these practices have been going on.
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Bethel liquor store debate postponed at Alaska ABC Board meeting

Bethel liquor store debate postponed at Alaska ABC Board meeting | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The application by Bethel Native Corp., through Bethel Spirits LLC, for a liquor store in Bethel was put on hold Wednesday during a meeting of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board in Fairbanks.
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Zip it

Zip it | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
IT IS not often that a criminal trial involves a prosecutor pushing for rehabilitation and appropriate counselling", and a defence lawyer urging the judge to jail his client. But that is what happened at a hearing on June 2nd for Amos Yee, a 16-year-old Singaporean blogger found guilty of circulating an obscene image and insulting Christians.
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Walker names appointees for Alaska's first Marijuana Control Board

Walker names appointees for Alaska's first Marijuana Control Board | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska's Marijuana Control Board will craft regulations surrounding legalized recreational and commercial marijuana. Of 132 applicants vying for the spots, here are the five chosen by Gov. Bill Walker.
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Short and too sweet

Short and too sweet | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“DON’T use anything you can’t pronounce,” Johnson read recently about shampoos. The writer was making a pitch in favour of natural oils, and against those...
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The Case for the 32-Hour Workweek

Ryan Carson, the CEO of Treehouse, discusses the benefits of a four-day workweek and why more companies can, and should, do it.
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'Sharing economy' masks cold business interest

'Sharing economy' masks cold business interest | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The EU is currently considering how it should respond to the phenomenon which is often called the "sharing economy".
But there is a danger that lawmakers get caught up in a slick Silicon Valley narrative, which portrays profit-seeking companies as altruistic public services.

Via Svend Aage Christensen
Rob Duke's insight:

Uber is a good example of this....better to have taxi cabs with their imbedded political power?

For my own part, I'll take institutions that bring all activity into the light to invite all competition and in order to better regulate when we find those companies who are not altruistic (or at least act as "bad" citizens).....

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Greece not alone: Several Eurozone countries are still paying back debt from WWI and even 18th century debt!

Incredibly, because the 4% Consuls were used to refinance even older debt, some of the debt being repaid in early 2015 goes as far back as the 18th century. “In 1853, then-chancellor Gladstone consolidated, among other things, the capital stock of the South Sea Company originating in 1711, which had collapsed in the infamous South Sea Bubble financial crisis of 1720,” the UK Treasury said. And Chancellor George Goschen converted bonds first issued in 1752 and subsequently used them to finance the Napoleonic and Crimean Wars, as well as the Slavery Abolition Act of 1835.
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Gruesome weekend leaves Chicago police chief reeling - CNN.com

When a city has seven killings in two days, including the death of a 7-year-old boy, something is systemically wrong.
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Angela Perry's comment, July 6, 8:39 PM
This is a very sad story right here. I do agree with the statement "if Amari's dad was in jail he would still be with us today." Amari's dad had been arrested 45 times is a bit on the ridiculous side if you ask me. What happened to 3 strikes and you are out rule? What makes Amari's dad special that he wasn't put away for a while since his excessive arrest record. I want to believe that our justice systems are there to rehabilitate those that are entering them but this just makes me believe that they are so full there is no one being rehabilitated. I hope too that they find the other gang member that shot and killed Amari is put away for a very long time. Maybe they can make an example out of him so the other gang members can learn a lesson. But I know that is wishful thinking at this point.
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Does too much testosterone make men behave irresponsibly?

Does too much testosterone make men behave irresponsibly? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Research published yesterday by Imperial College London suggests that hormones testosterone and cortisol may be having a negative and potentially dangerous influence on the decision-making processes of City workers.
According to the study, the naturally-occurring steroids have been found to markedly increase the chances of risk-taking and audacious behaviour in men whose responsibilities include commercial and economic transactions.
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Jay Fulk's comment, July 6, 7:02 PM
That's quite an interesting topic. I've never thought about traders and financiers having too much testosterone, but I can see it being an issue for some. Being "manly" can get in the way of logical thinking and reasoning at times. Why not on the trading floor?
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Photos of Kids Playfully Crossing the US-Mexico Border | VICE | United States

Photos of Kids Playfully Crossing the US-Mexico Border | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Recently a storm took out a chain link fence separating the two countries at a park bisecting Tijuana and San Diego, letting people jump back and forth between nations.
Rob Duke's insight:

I interviewed a guy from Nayarit, Mexico who told me that he came to the U.S. for love.  I thought he had followed a girl, but he told me that his brother had been lucky to find his love when they were both children.  From an early age they both pledged their love to each other.  When they were of age, they wed and were living the "good life", but then one day a drug kingpin saw the bride and wanted her for his own.  She was, you see, a rare beauty...the kind that turn out to be princesses in storybooks.  But, alas, this was no fairy-tale: the kingpin had the groom killed and took what he wanted.  On the day of his brother's death, this man told me that he started walking north.  He no longer wished to live where you could die just because you loved.  He knew that if he ever would love in peace it would be here in the U.S.

 

This is why I don't believe we will ever stop the tide of people who wish to be here....you cannot stop love.

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Bethany McNutt's comment, July 6, 1:04 PM
I think we are all really quick to judge illegal and even legal immigrants. We think, “They are going to take our jobs”, “there won’t be enough jobs for Americans”, “they are here illegally, what else will they do that is illegal”, “they are here illegally so they need to commit crime to get by” etc. However, I watched a recent ted talk which was very thought provoking and it opened my eyes immensely. The video essentially revolves around human rights and the idea that we should think to ourselves, “what are they running from”. The fact of the matter is that we should look to see what these people are running from, rather than getting upset for them being here. The numbers of increased dead bodies that they have found just in the last 10 years along the border is absolutely astonishing and really helps paint a picture that these people would risk death than continue living in Mexico. I left the link down below for anyone who is interested in watching it. It gave me a whole new perspective on immigration and the Mexican border.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPlpbFKWc6E
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We Asked Foreign VICE Offices What They Think About America | VICE | United States

John Cena
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Sort of cartoonish, but fun...

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Aren't markets manipulated on the way up?

Aren't markets manipulated on the way up? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
CHINA'S stockmarket sell-off continues, with the Shanghai Composite sell-off reaching 10% in a week and approaching 30% from the peak. Somoene must be to blame and the authorities are investigating "market manipulation" with some short-selling accounts suspended. Earlier this week, measures were announced to prop up the market, including a proposal to allow traders to pledge their houses in margin accounts; one of the craziest ideas ever announced. What next? Pledge your kidneys on commodity futures?
Rob Duke's insight:

Another reason why WCC isn't always easy to differentiate....

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Why The Rules Of The Road Aren't Enough To Prevent People From Dying

Here’s how speed limits are established in most states, according to Federal Highway Administration research: Traffic engineers conduct a study to measure the average speed motor vehicles move along a road. The speed limit is then set at the 85th percentile. From then on, 85 percent of drivers would be traveling under the speed limit and 15 percent would be breaking the law. Sometimes other factors2 are taken into consideration, but in most places, speed limits are largely determined by the speed most people feel safe traveling.
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Haines man charged for shooting brown bear, cubs in his trash

Haines man charged for shooting brown bear, cubs in his trash | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska Wildlife Troopers said that the man couldn't invoke state laws allowing animals to be shot in defense of life and property because his improper storage of garbage had caused the incident.
Rob Duke's insight:

This is the jist of those who advance the idea that victims can contribute to their own victimization.  See Routine Activities Theory, for instance.  In rape investigations, this has been extremely controversial (e.g. the idea that the rape victim might contribute by failing to wear proper clothing, etc.).

 

What do you think?  Does the victim have to be 100% correct in order to be a "true" victim?

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Jay Fulk's comment, July 5, 7:31 PM
I have mixed feelings on this one. I do see the point of having such a clause in the laws about disposal of trash. I, however, do not agree with the charges being brought as misdemeanors. I think that he should face a fine and lose hunting privileges for a year or two. At the end of the day, these are just animals and they were on his property. I grew up in Ketchikan, so having black bears in our trash was not uncommon. We never shot a black bear for getting into our trash though.
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A costly mistake

A costly mistake | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
OVER five years after BP’s Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded in waters off the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 men and unleashing millions of gallons of crude...
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Appeals court blasts lawyers and 'scorched earth tactics,' publishes opinion despite settlement

Appeals court blasts lawyers and 'scorched earth tactics,' publishes opinion despite settlement | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“We find FCI’s conduct with respect to this entire case demonstrative of a particularly nasty type of scorched earth tactics,” the court opinion said, referring to Finton Construction as FCI. “While we strongly suspect that FCI is the prime mover behind the prosecution of this lawsuit, we remind FCI’s counsel–and indeed, all attorneys–that while they owe their clients a duty to zealously represent them, that zealousness does not trump the duty they owe the courts and the judicial process to prosecute only lawsuits with merit.

“The type of uncivil behavior and specious tactics demonstrated by filing this case represents conduct that brings disrepute to the entire legal profession and amounts to toying with the courts.”
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