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Suddenly, Pot Is Legal in (Part of) the United States

Suddenly, Pot Is Legal in (Part of) the United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
While you were watching to see whether Romney or Obama won Ohio, both Colorado and Washington legalized marijuana for recreational use on Tuesday.
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Kiara's comment, November 12, 2012 6:28 PM
This didn't come as a huge shock to me. It's been a topic of discussion & debate for entirely too long, in my opinion. I don't have a straight forward opinion on whether I think its a good or a bad thing. I think that unintended consequences will result from the legalization of marijuana. I also know that it will greatly improve the economic issues, the major debt problem that the U.S. is dealing with. When I started reading this article, the first thing that came to mind was the fact that the Federal Government probably isn't on board with these states. This will likely cause a lot of issues because there are two different laws being implemented, one says yes & one says no. I foresee this being a huge issue among distributors of this substance. I just hope that people take this new "right" of theirs and deal with it responsibly where as not to affect people who don't want any part in it. I just hope that the government can come to an appropriate method of monitoring the growth, distribution and consumption of it. The end of the article stating that by the 22nd century, Americans will be buying a pack of joints makes me laugh. So far that they know it hasn't caused lung cancer...more power to them. Regardless of whether it's legal or not I won't personally run out to smoke a joint. Not for me! Good reading!!!
T Hall's comment, November 14, 2012 1:36 AM
I think the progression towards legalizing marijuana is a wise decision. If people want to smoke and put themselves at risk, they should be allowed to do so while others benefit from their choices. The high tax on marijuana would potentially give America the educational boost we so desperately need to give students a useful education. In addition, though there has been little research done on marijuana (I believe due to Federal regulations), marijuana is one of the “safer” drugs one may choose to use. If alcohol and tobacco, which are leading causes of deaths and may influence poor behavior, can be legal, what’s the problem with marijuana? From a utilitarian standpoint, legalizing this drug would bring about the greatest good for the greatest number in terms of revenue that could go towards education.
Mari Freitag's comment, November 19, 2012 12:19 AM
I'm pretty fascinated with the legal power struggle between the state and federal governments that this is creating. I expect that we'll see some monumental supreme court opinions come out of this in a few years, which will be very interesting to read. I think that the article does predict well that this movement is continuing to gain momentum. What worries me is that the federal government isn't going to give these states a "free pass" when it comes to the drug. I think that it would probably take a statement by President Obama on behalf of states' rights, but I doubt that's going to happen. This is going to create a huge industry in CO and WA, but also make interstate trafficking that much more of an issue. I suppose that this already happens with alcohol between wet, dry, and damp boroughs and counties. Overall, this will be an incredibly interesting legal battle to watch over the coming years.
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Even in large cities, we build TIGHTLY-KNIT communities

Even in large cities, we build TIGHTLY-KNIT communities | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

A study of group clustering--do your friends know each other?--shows that it does not change with city size. [via Flowing Data]


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The criminalisation of American business

The criminalisation of American business | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
WHO runs the world’s most lucrative shakedown operation? The Sicilian mafia? The People’s Liberation Army in China? The kleptocracy in the Kremlin? If you are a...
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Why BMI is a big fat scam

Why BMI is a big fat scam | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Body mass index is used to sell weight loss drugs, set insurance premiums, and counsel patients. There's just one little problem.
Rob Duke's insight:

BMI was arbitrarily lowered by a committee funded by weight loss drug companies...is this white collar crime or just rent-seeking behavior?

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An Oklahoma program treats juvenile sex offenders as kids, not criminals | Al Jazeera America

An Oklahoma program treats juvenile sex offenders as kids, not criminals | Al Jazeera America | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Shedding the stigma and reducing recidivism through support, education and therapy – not prison time

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Do gut bacteria control your mind? | KurzweilAI

Do gut bacteria control your mind? | KurzweilAI | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Bacteria within you — which outnumber your own cells about 100 times — may be affecting both your cravings and moods to get you to eat what they want, and may be driving you toward obesity.

 

That’s the conclusion of an article published this week in the journal BioEssays by researchers from UC San Francisco,Arizona State University and University of New Mexico from a review of the recent scientific literature.

 

How your gut microbiome may control you

The diverse community of microbes, collectively known as the gut microbiome, influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on, rather than simply passively living off whatever nutrients we choose to send their way.Some bacterial species prefer fat, and others sugar, for instance. They vie with each other for food and to retain a niche within their ecosystem — your digestive tract — and they also often have different aims than you do when it comes to your own actions.Bacteria may influence your decisions by releasing signaling molecules into your gut. Because the gut is linked to the immune system, the endocrine system, and the nervous system, those signals could influence your physiologic and behavioral responses — and health.Bacteria may be acting through the vagus nerve, which connects 100 million nerve cells from the digestive tract to the base of the brain, changing taste receptors, producing toxins to make you feel bad, and releasing chemical rewards to make you feel good.Certain strains of bacteria increase anxious behavior (in mice).Some strains of bacteria cause stomach cancer and perhaps other cancers. 

What you can do (with medical guidance)

Make changes in what you eat. There are measurable changes in the microbiome within 24 hours of diet change, evolving on the time scale of minutes.Take appropriate probiotics. One study showed a drink containing Lactobacillus casei improved mood in those who were feeling the lowest.Kill targeted species with specific antibiotics.Acquire specialized bacteria that digest your favorite foods. (Bacteria that digest seaweed are found in humans in Japan, where seaweed is popular in the diet.)See previous KurzweilAI posts on gut bacteria

 

The co-authors’ study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, the Bonnie D. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin.

 

 


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Jim Manske's curator insight, August 22, 4:50 PM

On our trip to Korea two years ago, I started eating Kimchi regularly.  (There are hundreds of varieties of Kimchi consumed there other than the cabbage Kimchi commonly found in some US grocery stores.)  

 

I noticed an almost immediate positive effect on my digestive process as I increased the probiotic supply.  Now, I wonder what other effects the members of my "biome" may be influencing.  And I am grateful that we have learned to make our own kimchi, and our refrigerator has an abundance in the moment!

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Wyoming cop charged with animal cruelty after death of K9 dog left in hot squad car

Wyoming cop charged with animal cruelty after death of K9 dog left in hot squad car | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Black Labrador Nyx died of heat stroke in July after being locked in a patrol car outside a Mills, Wyo., police station for about five hours as temperatures jumped from 53 that morning to at least 86 degrees.
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Suspects traded hostage for cigarettes in Harvey, Illinois standoff, police say

Suspects traded hostage for cigarettes in Harvey, Illinois standoff, police say | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Authorities say negotiations with two suspects accused of holding eight people hostage in Harvey, Ill. earlier this week were bizarre
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Ferguson injustice: Cop deaths denied equal treatment by Obama, news media

Ferguson injustice: Cop deaths denied equal treatment by Obama, news media | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The response by law enforcement to protesters in Ferguson, Mo., is being criticized for its level of force and use of military-style equipment. We've labeled the weapons and gear being used by police in these photos from Ferguson.
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5 reasons Americans are unhappy

Why people living in one of the wealthiest countries in the world are glum
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Durkheim, Marx, and Weber all had variations of the idea of "alienation", a better explanation that the article gives, but perhaps each of these 5 reasons is a symptom of "alienation", "anomie", "the Iron Cage of Bureaucracy".  Also, see Alberto Guerreiro Ramos' excellent analysis on the subject in the seminal "The New Science of Organizations: a reexamination of the wealth of nations", 1984 Univ. of Toronto Press.

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Ferguson business owners aren't counting on police protection

Ferguson business owners aren't counting on police protection | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Many say they have little confidence that the police, despite their numbers, will be effective in stopping their stores from being looted and vandalized.
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What a grand jury will look for in the Michael Brown shooting

What a grand jury will look for in the Michael Brown shooting | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“He has everything he needs to make an arrest,” Benjamin Crump, an attorney for the Brown family, told msnbc Tuesday. “If he’s going to do it, it’s up to him.”
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What kind of prison might the inmates design?

What kind of prison might the inmates design? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The workshop leaders came laden with markers in colors other than red and blue (gang colors), drafting rulers crafted from museum board (too dull to double as weapons) and kiddie scissors (ditto).
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The Ivy League, Mental Illness, and the Meaning of Life

The Ivy League, Mental Illness, and the Meaning of Life | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
William Deresiewicz explains how an elite education can lead to a cycle of grandiosity and depression. 
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Revisiting Ricardo

Revisiting Ricardo | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
DEFENDERS of globalisation often say that, whatever distress it may cause for rich-world workers, it has been good for poor countries. Between 1988 and 2008, global...
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Exiled Tanana man argues for return to jail

Exiled Tanana man argues for return to jail | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS — One of the men banished by the Tanana tribal government this spring is suing in federal court for the right to return. 
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To have and have not

To have and have not | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“POVERTY”, wrote Aristotle, “is the parent of crime.” But was he right? Certainly, poverty and crime are associated. And the idea that a lack of income might...
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Justice Ginsburg: America Has A ‘Real Racial Problem’

Justice Ginsburg: America Has A ‘Real Racial Problem’ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court was "once a leader in the world" in combating racial discrimination, according to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “What’s amazing," she added, "is how things have changed.”

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The Feds ride out

The Feds ride out | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SET beside a lake two hours’ drive from Mexico City, Valle de Bravo brands itself a Pueblo Mágico (“Magical Town”). Normally it is a place where the...
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The Cautionary Instruction: Predicting crime is fine, predicting criminals ... not so fast

The Cautionary Instruction: Predicting crime is fine, predicting criminals ... not so fast | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Predictive analytics has made its way into the criminal justice system through the use of assessments to predict future risk. U.S. Attorney General Er...
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UPS Data Breach: 7 Vital Security Lessons Learned

UPS Data Breach: 7 Vital Security Lessons Learned | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The UPS Store, a subsidiary of United Parcel Service, reported finding the infected systems Aug. 20. The stores affected represented about 1 percent of the company's 4,470 U.S. franchises.
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'Frozen Ground' serial killer Hansen dead

'Frozen Ground' serial killer Hansen dead | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Serial killer Robert Hansen died early Thursday morning, the Department of Corrections confirmed.
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Michael Brown's Autopsy: What It Can (and Can't) Tell Us

Michael Brown's Autopsy: What It Can (and Can't) Tell Us | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The results of two autopsies of Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager shot by a St. Louis police officer on Aug. 9, can't provide crucial information about the circumstances surrounding the shooting.
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Cultural ties may help prevent suicide, experts say

Cultural ties may help prevent suicide, experts say | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Suicide rates for Alaska Natives 70 and older are only half the national rates for that age group, according to information gathered by James Allen, a professor of psychology at the University of Minnesota, and his colleagues.
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Study: Skipping sleep may increase risk of false memories, compromise criminal investigations - Newsday

Study: Skipping sleep may increase risk of false memories, compromise criminal investigations - Newsday | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Skipping a few hours of sleep here and there, or even on a regular basis,
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South Pasadena Alleged School Massacre Plot Foiled

South Pasadena Alleged School Massacre Plot Foiled | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Two Southern California male teenagers were being held in juvenile hall today after an investigation by authorities using social media discovered the two were in the early stages of a plot to allegedly commit a mass shooting at South Pasadena High School. “It was a very viable threat what they were plotting,” said South Pasadena Police Chief Art Miller. “They were making a huge plan of a school massacre. … During our interviews with the suspects, they, more or less, confirmed what they had talked about, very cold-heartedly.” Miller said the suspects, whom police did not identify, were 16 and…
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