Criminology and Economic Theory
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Jesse Cadman: Mother of teen’s killer has reached out to his family

Jesse Cadman: Mother of teen’s killer has reached out to his family | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Supriya Deas can divide her life into before and after. Before her son Isaac killed 16-year-old Jesse Cadman, she was an ordinary community member.
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LaDonna Coghill's comment, November 14, 2012 12:06 AM
This story is an amazing one. To think that after all the years that passed that these families were able to work together so that all parties could move on with their lives without hatred or resentment. This mother should be given kudos for doing all that she did to help her son find peace within himself, it seems like even after he committed murder that he was walking down an angry and violent path that his mother saved him from. This story is a great example for restorative justice, with the offender taking responsibility for his actions and taking the steps to make amends for those actions.
T Hall's comment, November 14, 2012 1:47 AM
This is actually a pretty remarkable story. The dedication of Isaac’s mother is quite inspiring and she was able to ignite the change her son desperately needed. In a sense, Isaac may have felt shame and by feeling shame, he was able to hold himself accountable for his poor decisions. It seems like through meditation, he was about to highlight his personal values and to really consider his priorities in life. I give a lot of credit to both families for having the patience and commitment to work through such a horrific situation. I really enjoyed how the mother commented about if one chooses to live in fear and with the anger, the murder has then taken more than one life. The restorative justice approach is so powerful and enables individuals to actively take responsibility and to work on reintegration into society as a law abiding citizen.
Kimberly's comment, November 15, 2012 8:52 PM
This was a really good story. It is very rare that after something tragic like this happens that the two (in this case families) would end up civil with each other. I think that it took a lot from the Cadman family to be able to forgive and try to move on from what happened. Most mother's would probably turn the other way on their child, but Deas chose to try to help her son become a better person and to change the path that he was on. It shows that taking the time and effort to help someone change and to become a better person. it is good to know that Deas and her son go to different jails and tell their story. It truly does help other inmates know that there is a different way, and they can choose to live a different life. I believe that Deas and her son will change lives, and by doing their part may reduce the amount of murders that could happen when other inmates are let out.
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The spike in violent crime last year was biggest annual increase in 25 years

The spike in violent crime last year was biggest annual increase in 25 years | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The nation's violent crime rate rose again in 2016, with murder up sharply, according to data released Monday by the FBI.
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Judicial Elections Reform Bill Goes to Governor

This law would prohibit judges from putting descriptions like "former gang prosecutor" in their ballot descriptions....
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The Most Dangerous States in America in 2017

The Most Dangerous States in America in 2017 | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
We all want to feel safe and secure where we live. But if you live in one of these states, you might want to look over your shoulder.
Rob Duke's insight:
Guess who's number 1?
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Suspect Plans to Sue ‘Hero’ Who Stopped Him From Robbing Starbucks

Suspect Plans to Sue ‘Hero’ Who Stopped Him From Robbing Starbucks | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
During the altercation, Flores stabbed Jerri in the neck. Jerri eventually wrestled the knife away from Flores and stabbed the suspect multiple times, according to police.

While police called Jerri a hero, the suspect's mother said her son is a victim.

"He has 17 total stab wounds, lacerations, and defensive wounds," Pamela Chimienti told KSEE.

Flores, who remains in jail on attempted robbery charges, now plans to sue Jerri for excessive force, according to KSEE.

"The guy, in my opinion, went from a good Samaritan to a vigilante. Stabbing somebody that many times, it doesn't take that many stab wounds to get somebody to succumb to you," Chimienti said.

Chief Jerry Dyer said the idea that Jerri would be sued is "ludicrous" and said he does not face any criminal charges.
Rob Duke's insight:
Sounds about right for Fresno.  I was eating at a Taqueria in an old Taco Bell (you know the old mission looking ones with the walk up self-service areas that had been converted to seating areas with an addition).  I had my black & white parked out front and was plain clothes, but only guy in the place, so doesn't take a genius to figure out who the cop is.  Two Bulldog gang members come in and sit down and when I finish eating I get up and put my trash away and keep an eye on them out of the corner of my eye while one of them gets up and starts to take my tablet off the table.  I clear my throat and he stalls in mid-pose hanging over my table from his seat.  I tell him that wouldn't be very smart and they have the nerve to say "yeah, what are you going to do?"  "Chuckle. I'm sure I'll think of something."  He was bold but not stupid.  "It's cool. I was just looking bro!"  "yeah, cool story 'bro'--tell it again."
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Jordan Wright's comment, September 24, 5:50 PM
This is an interesting case. In my opinion, I think that the guy did the right thing in stopping the man. He was brave enough to put his life in danger in orde to help out others and do the "right thing."
Daniel Heppeard's comment, September 24, 11:35 PM
Well, isn't this just a roller coaster of a events? While this man attempted to rob a place, a local man stopped him from doing so, resulting in the accused to be stabbed 17 times. While I can see why he plans on suing the one who stopped him, what is the reason behind why he was stabbed? Just because? Yeah right. Best of luck in court.
Jonathan Hall's comment, September 25, 3:42 AM
That's actually pretty interesting. It does sound ludicrous to me to try and sue that guy. I mean, the article said that the robber stabbed the guy in the neck. I would be rather upset too if someone stabbed me. Either way, it'll be interesting to see how far this goes.
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Man in clown mask chases daughter into armed stranger's apartment

Man in clown mask chases daughter into armed stranger's apartment | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The father is charged with inducing panic and child endangering.
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Jordan Wright's comment, September 24, 5:56 PM
I feel bad for the girl in this situation. I don't understand why the father thought that scaring his daughter was a form of discipline. He should definitely have to take some parenting classes if he is allowed custody of his daughter again.
Daniel Heppeard's comment, September 24, 11:50 PM
I don't really want to call the man stupid, but he's kind of dumb having done this. I feel like this was a response to the reboot movie "It" by Stephen King. It's a good scare tactic, but would it really convince the child to behave? I mean, isn't there another way to make her behave besides scaring the soul out of her? I think the guy got what he deserved after this act.
Jonathan Hall's comment, September 25, 3:48 AM
Wow... people are just insane. That makes no sense at all, and it went WAY too far. I feel awful for that girl though. Especially with all the other stupid clown shenanigans going on...
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Saudi authorities pressure Snapchat to block Al-Jazeera

Saudi authorities pressure Snapchat to block Al-Jazeera | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Saudi authorities pressure Snapchat to block Al-Jazeera
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These miniature murder scenes have shown detectives how to study homicides for 70 years

These miniature murder scenes have shown detectives how to study homicides for 70 years | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It was the fourth day of a week-long forensic science course called the Frances Glessner Lee Seminar in Homicide Investigation. Glessner Lee (1878-1962) was an heiress to the International Harvester fortune who became focused on the problem of old-school death investigators overlooking or disturbing evidence that science could unlock. She endowed a department of legal medicine at Harvard Medical School in the 1930s and launched the Harvard Seminars in Homicide Investigation. And she crafted the death dioramas, which she called “Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death.” Her friend Erle Stanley Gardner, the writer who created Perry Mason, dedicated one of his Mason mysteries to her. He credited her with “helping to make the competent state police official as much a professional man as the doctor or lawyer.” After Harvard’s legal medicine department folded in the 1960s, an alumnus who was then the Maryland medical examiner brought the Nutshell Studies to Baltimore on long-term loan from Harvard. “She is the mother of forensic science,” says Bruce Goldfarb, public information officer in the medical examiner’s office, who is researching a biography of Glessner Lee. “She helped evolve the field to ‘C.S.I.’ and what people expect today.”

On the first day of the seminar, 56 prosecutors and detectives from as far as China, Ontario and Colorado were assigned in groups to different Nutshell Studies. “Your job is not really to solve them as you would a puzzle,” instructed Jerry Dziecichowicz, secretary-treasurer of Harvard Associates in Police Science, which helps put on the seminar, “but go in and observe. Record evidence you think would have medical importance” to explain cause and manner of death. Later, at the end of day four, they would have to present the most important clues they had gleaned. During the week, between lectures on 21st-century techniques for interpreting bloodstains, distinguishing varieties of gunshot wounds and determining time of death, the detectives ducked into Room 417 to do their homework, poring over the dolls.

Though not actual crime scene with real corpses, the dioramas, with their three-dimensionality and welter of detail, remain excellent tools for exercising powers of observation. Maybe the works would have lost some relevance if Glessner Lee had not gone to astonishing lengths to create a handmade virtual reality: According to Goldfarb, who has studied how the dioramas were constructed, the keys and doorknobs turn, and the gates open; tiny stubbed-out cigarettes contain real burned tobacco; mini newspapers are printed with actual front pages; shelves contain reproduction cans and cartons of groceries. Glessner Lee sewed the victims’ clothes, carefully administered wear and tear to wallpaper and rugs, knitted the stitches inside a deceased wife’s diminutive basket of yarn, threaded the needle on the sewing machine in a home where a family lies slain and hand-wrote love letters strewn in an attic beside a woman hanging from a beam. (If the victim committed suicide, how did one of her shoes end up around the corner and down the stairs?)

The epitome of Glessner Lee’s obsession with verisimilitude was the way she extended this richly tragic world beyond what Nutshell viewers could possibly see. Inside a saloon is a poster for a boxing match that you can glimpse only if you’re a six-inch-tall patron bellying up to the bar. “Real life is like that — real life is detailed,” Goldfarb told me. “There’s a lot to absorb. You don’t know what the relevant information is. She said she wanted people to lose themselves and immerse themselves in this world.”
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Jordan Wright's comment, September 24, 5:59 PM
This is a super neat way to do trainings. It is good that the detectives have some experience before stepping onto a real scene.
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Portland police to halt, purge all gang designations

Portland police to halt, purge all gang designations | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"This is too long coming,'' said Mayor Ted Wheeler, who serves as police commissioner. "It was the right thing to do.''
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British Police Arrest Man in Hunt for London Bombers

British Police Arrest Man in Hunt for London Bombers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
British police are keeping an open mind on whether more than one person was responsible for a London train bombing that injured 30 people, after they arrested an 18-year-old man earlier on Saturday.
"We are still pursuing numerous lines of enquiry, and at great pace," Senior National Co-ordinator for Counter Terrorism Policing Neil Basu told reporters.
"Our priorities are ... to identify and locate any other potential suspects."
British police arrested an 18-year-old man in the port of Dover and raided a house in a small town outside London on Saturday as they hunted for whoever planted a bomb on a commuter train that injured 30 people a day earlier.
Prime Minister Theresa May put Britain on the highest security level of "critical" late on Friday, meaning another attack may be imminent, and deployed soldiers and armed police to strategic locations such as nuclear plants and defence sites.
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Gregory Foster's comment, September 16, 11:30 PM
I feel that this has the look of a solo attack not from a terrorist cell. The fact that the bomb is poorly made makes me think this. ISIS claiming responsibility is not a very good indication of how deep the plan is and whether there is a cell or not. This is just my first blush response. I know that the UK government is pushing for a lot of online surveillance to help thwart recruiting and training online. This is not something that I agree with because it is most likely going to be implemented incorrectly. I do not want my rights to be curtailed or limited because of what somebody else has done. This is my fear when the government pushes to limit these type of attacks through surveillance of internet activity. I prefer a honeypot strategy where a person who is looking for that type of information would be scooped up in the investigation rather than a person like me who does not look for ISIS material or bomb making instructions. I know our government does a lot of this type of sting operations but I worry about mission creep leading to a loss of rights for the general person. It seems sad though to think that our new norm is to accept that there will be random attacks, people will die, and that is just the way life is from now on.
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UK PM wonders if police have 'powers' they need to deal with terror

UK PM wonders if police have 'powers' they need to deal with terror | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
May sat down with George Stephanopoulos for an exclusive interview.
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Jonathan Hall's comment, September 17, 5:02 PM
It's interesting when the Internet is brought up like this. The Internet is so widely available that it is difficult to stop the use of it for a specific purpose.
Joe Dugan's comment, September 18, 3:31 AM
So it's not okay for the President of the United States to comment on an ongoing investigation of this stature, however every single news/media outlet has been covering it 24/7 since it happened? He's pointing out that Scotland Yard is basically "handcuffed" and can't protect with the powers they have now. Then she comes out and says the same. Hmmmmmm
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Teen 'killed mayor in revenge for dad's death'

Teen 'killed mayor in revenge for dad's death' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Teen 'killed mayor in revenge for dad's death'
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Joe Dugan's comment, September 18, 3:27 AM
It's a scary world we are living in now. To think someone would go as far as to, not only kill, but get up and personal and slash a throat. It's not like this guy forced the father to commit suicide. This 18 year old just ruined his life over this, for what?
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Germans are living the best life, but the French and Danish aren’t far behind

Germans are living the best life, but the French and Danish aren’t far behind | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Germans are living the best life, but the French and Danish are not so far behind. For the sixth year in a row, Germany gained the top spot in the Quality of Nationality Index (QNI), a ranking of nationalities based on the levels of freedom and quality of life citizens enjoy. The study was conducted b
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Cults and Terrorism: Can We Establish Parallels Between Noxious Belief Systems?

Cults and Terrorism: Can We Establish Parallels Between Noxious Belief Systems? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Cults and Terrorism: Can We Establish Parallels Between Noxious Belief Systems?

Sarah Mills July 5, 2017 Opinion, Religion 3 Comments

Can insights and lessons about human behavioural trends and group psychologies from cults help us understand and thereby reduce risks of terrorism today?

Whether they are known as high-demand/control groups, new religious movements, or cults, their frequent association with scandals in which both physical and psychological abuse, violence, and even fatalities feature notoriously, begs the question: At what point does a religion cease to be a relatively anodyne cultural system and cross over into territory the state should not, must not, protect through religious freedom?

The argument could be made that no religion is entirely innocent; throughout history, different religions have, with the complicity of the state, not only made adherence to their precepts compulsory under pain of torture or death, but also forcefully converted nonbelievers in their imperialistic ambitions. Comedian Joe Rogan made the following joke: “The difference between a cult and religion? A cult is led by a guy who knows it’s bullshit. In a religion, that guy is dead.”
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Russian couple suspected of eating up to 30 victims

Russian couple suspected of eating up to 30 victims | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

Russian police appear to have discovered one of the country's most grisly cases of cannibalism after pictures of dismembered bodies were found on a phone belonging to one of the main suspects, Russia's state media reported Monday.

The gruesome case in the southern Krasnodar region has led to the arrest of a 35-year-old man and his wife, both of whom are alleged to have murdered as many as 30 people since 1999 and consumed parts of the bodies, Russian media reported. Police have identified seven victims so far.
The crimes were uncovered when a cell phone, which included images of the man posing with a dismembered female victim, was found on a street in Krasnodar earlier this month. The remains of the woman were found in a bag nearby the following day, according to the official news agency RIA Novosti.
At first, the man denied having killed the woman, claiming he had found the remains and had taken photographs of himself with them, before losing his phone.
A source told state news agency RIA Novosti that many of the details of the case were yet to be confirmed, but added that "at the moment, law enforcement had discovered a glass jar with a canned hand."


"According to the owner of a cell phone that had been lost before, this is one of those hands with which he made a selfie," the source told RIA Novosti.
The source told RIA Novosti that so far the man had admitted to only two murders -- that of the female victim identified in the cell phone photos, and of another person in 2012.
CNN has reached out to the Investigative Committee in Moscow for confirmation of the details of the case, the latest in a string of serial killings in Russia.
Earlier this year, former policeman Mikhail Popkov was charged with 60 additional murders in addition to 22 that had already resulted in convictions. He carried out the killings over nearly twenty years.

Rob Duke's insight:
See the reference to the Investigative Committee....
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California Today: What if Legal Pot Costs More Than Black-Market Pot?

California Today: What if Legal Pot Costs More Than Black-Market Pot? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Tuesday: Looming trouble with black-market marijuana, a raucous news conference for Nancy Pelosi, and the pain of San Diego’s Charger fans.
Rob Duke's insight:
That'll only be temporary...same thing happened when alcohol was legalized...
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Law Enforcement Increasingly Relies on Interior Security Cameras During Criminal Probes

Law Enforcement Increasingly Relies on Interior Security Cameras During Criminal Probes | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Home security systems are becoming more popular with younger homeowners who realize that sometimes bad things can happen when they're at home as well as when they're away, said Bill Haney, one of the owners of Young's Security Systems, a Springfield company that also serves McLean County customers.

"We're putting cameras in more frequently that even a year ago," said Haney.

Security cameras have become more sophisticated, offering higher quality video for a lower cost — both attractive features for 20- to 30-year-old residents, said Haney.

For some people, interior cameras are part of a larger home security system that includes exterior video recorders and alarms.

Robert Brown, owner of Rockstar Audio Visual & Integrated Security in Normal, said customers often purchase home video systems to monitor child care and house cleaning staff in addition to personal security. Others are looking for a way to keep an eye on pets while they are away.

When crime reports are up, sales also spike, said Brown.

"We see the security systems go up when there are more burglaries," he said.

What's captured on security cameras outside a home also can be helpful to authorities.
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Jonathan Hall's comment, September 25, 3:52 AM
With higher quality cameras it would definitely make it possible to identify someone trying to break into a house. Whenever I see security came footage it is so low quality that it doesn't seem very useful.
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Therapeutic Jurisprudence rising in Japan!

Therapeutic Jurisprudence rising in Japan! | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
TJ founder David B. Wexler reflects on his recent visit to the Japan where TJ is being used as a lens for legal system reform... I’ve just returned from Japan, where , on September 1, 2017, I keynoted a fantastic therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) program. The fact that I returned home to Puerto Rico the night…
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California dad pleads not guilty in deaths of his children

California dad pleads not guilty in deaths of his children | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
California dad pleads not guilty in deaths of his children
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California grandpa throws man off roof to end hours-long police standoff

California grandpa throws man off roof to end hours-long police standoff | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A California grandfather took matters into his own hands when a stranger jumping on rooftops caused an hours-long police standoff on Tuesday.
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Ashley von Borstel's comment, September 23, 7:39 AM
I find this story absolutely hilarious! You just don't expect to read something like this and it is very true that age is just a number. Every individual's body is different.
Daniel Heppeard's comment, September 24, 11:43 PM
This was a total highlight to my night. I'm glad to hear that this man was brave enough to go up onto his roof, risking his own life, to throw this assailant off his roof. Although, I am a bit surprised that Burgess didn't receive any sort of small punishment or even a "You shouldn't do that" kind of talk. All-in-all though, great story!
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URINE LUCK: San Francisco Says You Can Pee On The Sidewalk

URINE LUCK: San Francisco Says You Can Pee On The Sidewalk | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The ever-progressive city of San Francisco is now allowing people to urinate on the sidewalk.
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Video shows woman before hotel freezer death

Video shows woman before hotel freezer death | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Surveillance video may shed light on the mysterious death of a young Chicago woman whose body was found in a hotel freezer last week. The case sparked accusations of foul play on social media.

Police in Rosemont, a suburb northwest of Chicago, said Kenneka Jenkins, 19, was last seen early Saturday, September 9, at a party at the Crowne Plaza Chicago O'Hare Hotel. Her family reported her missing later that day, and Jenkins' body was found in the walk-in freezer at the hotel shortly before 1 a.m. Sunday. The results of an autopsy by the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office are pending.
Surveillance video from inside the Crowne Plaza, released by the Rosemont Public Safety Department and obtained by CNN, shows Jenkins staggering through the hotel's hallways early Saturday.

Kenneka Jenkins is shown here in this photo from Facebook.
In the footage, Jenkins is first seen walking through the hotel with several unidentified people around 1:13 a.m. on that Saturday. She appears to be steady.
But when Jenkins is next sighted exiting an elevator at 3:25 a.m., she is alone and visibly impaired, and staggers out of the elevator, briefly leaning on the wall for support before heading down the hallway.
Surveillance cameras next catch Jenkins in hallways at 3:27 and 3:29 a.m., also alone. She struggles to head in one direction, and nearly falls over several times, but catches herself.
The last clip shows Jenkins stumbling through the hotel kitchen, which appears to be empty. She walks out of view of the cameras at 3:32 a.m., the last time she was seen before her body was found in the hotel's walk-in freezer.
Police say they have 36 hours of surveillance video from that weekend and have publicly released all clips in which Jenkins can be seen.
At no point in the footage provided to CNN can Jenkins be seen walking into the freezer.
Andrew Holmes, a community activist who said he is working with Jenkins' family, said Thursday that Rosemont police showed him surveillance video of the young woman walking into the freezer in the hotel basement on her own.
Holmes told CNN affiliate WBBM Jenkins appeared to be lost and tried several doors to get upstairs to the hotel lobby before she walked into the freezer, located in an unsecure area.
"We all wanted to know: Did anybody pull her down there? Did anybody force her down there? Was anybody on the other side in that room when she got down there? And the answer to that is no," Holmes told WBBM.
Holmes urged anyone with evidence in the case to contact police and stop making accusations on social media.
"Just don't put it out there on Facebook because if you put it out there, then be prepared to answer what you put out there," Holmes told WBBM.
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Ashley von Borstel's comment, September 23, 7:48 AM
I had heard about this story a couple days ago and it is definitely a weird situation. By that, I mean how in the world did she get into the kitchen with no staff around and how did she get in the freezer when there were latches on the inside and out? She was obviously impaired, so many scenarios can be determined as to how she ended up in the freezer.
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FACT CHECK: Are Police in Sweden No Longer Investigating Rapes Since Migrants Arrived?

FACT CHECK: Are Police in Sweden No Longer Investigating Rapes Since Migrants Arrived? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Former UKIP leader Nigel Farage cited the conspiracy web site InfoWars in a tweet claiming police in Sweden admitted they are "no longer" investigating rape.
Rob Duke's insight:
Well, not exactly, but Europeans are more worried than they've been in the past about their immigrant populations.
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Reality Check: Prime minister on police pay

Reality Check: Prime minister on police pay | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Theresa May says an officer starting in 2010 would, by now, have received a 32% increase in pay in real terms.
Rob Duke's insight:
Mark Twain said there are "lies, damn lies, and then there are statistics".

The Prime Minister indeed makes her statistics seem like officers have had giant pay increases compared with everyone else, but she fails to acknowledge that she's talking about an employee who starts at Step A and proceeds up through Step E based upon merit and successful advancement in skills over 5 years (usually 5% per year).  Thus 25% of this "increase" is actually meritorious pay and a top step officer has increased 7% since 2010; or, about 1% per year.

You can see why the police union is annoyed with her.

BTW, a British pound is worth 1.34 u.s. dollars, so we're talking about a $12, 060 increase for both COLA and 5 payroll steps.
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Spain summons 700 Catalan mayors to court

Spain summons 700 Catalan mayors to court | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Prosecutors order council leaders to appear for questioning over the banned independence referendum.
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Deal reached over the copyright of famous monkey selfie

Deal reached over the copyright of famous monkey selfie | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — Monkey see. Monkey sue. Monkey settle.

Attorneys representing a macaque monkey have agreed to a compromise in a case where they asserted the animal owned the copyright to selfie photos it had shot with a photographer's camera.

Under the deal, the photographer agreed to donate 25 percent of any future revenue from the images to charities dedicated to protecting crested macaques in Indonesia, said the lawyers from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals who filed the lawsuit.
Rob Duke's insight:
"And, now, for something complletely different:"


or: "meanwhile, in the United States....."
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Joe Dugan's comment, September 18, 3:35 AM
Well, looks like I better go find the Cow Moose and Calf from last winter I saw when snowshoeing, and pay them their fee before I get sued. Its stuff like this that make you realize why people are still being duped out of their money for a prince in Nigeria. Come on America we can do better.