Criminology and Economic Theory
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Alaska Sex-Trafficking Task Force Holds Hearing

Alaska Sex-Trafficking Task Force Holds Hearing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska task force holds hearing on sex trafficking; authorities say problem is underreported...
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Rob Duke's comment, November 16, 2012 2:30 PM
Kimberly,
Rob Duke's comment, November 16, 2012 2:31 PM
My guess is that it's everywhere. It may be preying on immigrants or just on foster home graduates.
Rob Duke's comment, November 16, 2012 2:43 PM
So, for instance, a "bottom-b!tch" (yes, that's a term of art meaning the pimps number one girl) allows herself to be picked up and sent to a foster home. Once at the foster home, she regails the other girls with how glamorous the lifestyle is and shows jewelry, pics, etc. This works to convince some of the girls to run away with her: at which point the pimp picks them all up.
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Ex-pharmacy head convicted of fraud over tainted medication

Ex-pharmacy head convicted of fraud over tainted medication | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A once-prominent drug executive was convicted today of racketeering and fraud but acquitted of murder for his role running the company that allegedly produced contaminated medicine that caused a deadly outbreak of infections including meningitis in 2012.

The jury today returned a mixed verdict in the trial of 50-year-old Barry Cadden, the former president and co-founder of the Boston-based New England Compounding Center, finding him guilty of racketeering and mail fraud but acquitting him on all 25 counts of second-degree murder.
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Where are the world's happiest countries?

Where are the world's happiest countries? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
People in the world's happiest countries live longer, freer, more generous lives, according to the 2017 World Happiness Report, released on World Happiness Day.
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Why Grammar Matters: Missing Oxford Comma Costs Dairy Company Millions

Why Grammar Matters: Missing Oxford Comma Costs Dairy Company Millions | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A legal loophole caused by a grammar dispute may have earned some Maine truck drivers overtime pay.
Rob Duke's insight:
Report writing 101: use the best grammar possible...it all matters; unfortunately, as much or more than the arrests and other good stuff that we do.
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Deputy killed on rape investigation had been honored for saving life

Deputy killed on rape investigation had been honored for saving life | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A deputy from the East Baton Rouge Sheriff's Office was fatally shot late Saturday night while conducting an investigation into an alleged rape, the East Baton Rouge Sheriff's Office and Louisiana State Police said.

Today, a news release confirmed the identity of the slain deputy as Sgt. Shawn Anderson.

"Sgt. Shawn Anderson died following a struggle in which shots were fired," a statement from the department read. "He and another deputy had responded to a business as part of a rape investigation."

Anderson was conducting the investigation near a barber shop in East Baton Rouge, and struggled with the shooting suspect before being killed, police said.
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Why Arkansas plans to execute a historic number of inmates over 10 days

Why Arkansas plans to execute a historic number of inmates over 10 days | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The state government of Arkansas plans to execute eight men over a period of 10 days in April because one of the key drugs in their lethal injection protocol is set to expire at the end of the month.
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Caitlin Mattingly's comment, March 21, 5:17 PM
This is kind of funny. At least they arent wasting anything! Theyre being conservative with the injections.
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The Economist explains: Universal basic incomes | The Economist

The Economist explains: Universal basic incomes | The Economist | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

ON JUNE 5th the Swiss overwhelmingly voted to reject an initiative that would have amended the constitution and required the government to take steps towards implementing a universal basic income—an unconditional cash payment given to all citizens. Supporters had favoured an income of SFr2,500 ($2,500) per month. Yet the universal basic income seems to be having a moment. The idea has the backing of people from wildly different parts of the ideological spectrum: like Charles Murray, a libertarian-minded scholar at the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute, and Andy Stern, an American labour leader. The tech world is interested too; Y Combinator, a tech accelerator, is commissioning research on the policy. How would they work and why are people so interested in them?

The idea behind a basic income for all is actually quite old. Thomas Paine reasoned in an essay published in 1797 that—in exchange for a social consensus in favour of private property rights—governments ought to pay everyone £15 per year. Politicians flirted with the notion off and on through the industrial revolution but generally built welfare states along different lines: as programmes of insurance for those who, because of age or bad luck, found themselves without work. Over the past decade, however, interest in basic incomes has grown alongside worries that the wages earned by workers are not rising quickly enough to boost living standards (or not rising at all, in some cases). Growth in pay has been disappointing for workers in many countries since 2000 or so, and the share of total income earned by workers (as opposed to owners of firms or land) has declined. Some basic-income supporters worry that powerful new technologies, like machine intelligence, will make life still harder for workers in future.


Setting up a basic income would be no easy matter. To pay every adult and child an income of about $10,000 per year, a country as rich as America would need to raise the share of GDP collected in tax by nearly 10 percentage points and cannibalise most non-health social-spending programmes. More generous programmes would require bigger tax increases still. There would be benefits. Poorer workers (and people who work for no income, like stay-at-home mums) would get a big boost to their incomes. Many people might use the payment to invest time and money in education or training. Entrepreneurship would become less risky. A more robust safety net would give workers more bargaining power with employers, and force firms to work harder to retain workers (and to make productivity-boosting investments). Yet there would also be big downsides. Many people might choose not to work at all; social tensions might rise. The availability of a basic income would almost certainly harden attitudes towards immigration.


INTERACTIVE: Our universal basic income calculator for OECD countries
The Swiss government, which issues an official opinion before such votes, was firmly opposed to the measure. It worried that a basic income would be ruinously expensive and morally corrosive, leaving the country with unsustainable public finances and a society of unmotivated loafers. Nevertheless, other countries are taking steps in a similar direction; both Finland and the Netherlands are planning basic-income experiments of their own. But while a universal basic income might well be a key part of the welfare state several decades down the road, it will take much more evidence that robots are stealing jobs, and more hardship for workers, to convince people in most countries to embrace such a radical step.

Rob Duke's insight:
What if you didn't have to worry about your basics?  Would you go to grad school?  Would you work on your novel?  Would you start a business in your garage?

Would crime disappear?
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Man arrested after seizure-inducing tweet

Man arrested after seizure-inducing tweet | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Journalist Kurt Eichenwald had an epilepsy seizure after receiving a tweet with an animated strobe image. Now, the FBI has arrested a suspect for cyberstalking.
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Why Do We Count?

Why Do We Count? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The abacus is a tool, just like the calculator is a tool. Your smartphone’s calculator app — that’s a tool, too.

But are numbers themselves a tool? That’s the case Caleb Everett makes in his new book, “Numbers and the Making of Us: Counting and the Course of Human Cultures.” Everett, a professor of anthropology at the University of Miami, shows that numbers — or the words and symbols we use to represent specific quantities — emerged through a series of slow historical steps. Numbers may feel instinctual. They may seem simple and precise. But Everett synthesizes the latest research from archaeology, anthropology, psychology and linguistics to argue that our counting systems are not just vital to human culture but also were invented by that culture. “Numbers are not concepts that come to people naturally and natively,” he writes. “Numbers are a creation of the human mind.”

I spoke to Everett by phone about the book.
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Police search home on property where slain Indiana teens were found

Police search home on property where slain Indiana teens were found | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Authorities investigating the murder of two Indiana teen girls served a search warrant today at the home of the man who owns the property where the girls' bodies were found, state and local officials told ABC News.

As of yet, no arrests have been made in the double murder case that shook the rural small town of Delphi, Indiana. State police told ABC News today that property owner Ron Logan is not a suspect "at this time."

Logan’s attorney, Andrew Achey, said in a statement, “Mr. Logan had no involvement in this heinous crime.”

"I would like to caution the public to avoid jumping to conclusions before law enforcement has completed the ongoing investigation," Achey added. "Not only does Mr. Logan maintain his innocence but he also encourages anyone with information to call the tip line."
Rob Duke's insight:
A break in the case!
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Caitlin Mattingly's comment, March 21, 5:18 PM
It very interesting to me that the owner of the property wasnt arrested or even considered a suspect. The bodies were found on his property. hmmmmm
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The gentrification of college hoops

The gentrification of college hoops | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An Undefeated analysis shows that first-generation college students are starting to disappear from NCAA sports
Rob Duke's insight:
You see this in other sports (e.g. Nascar, Football) and in professions (e.g. law, medicine), but it's even happening now in college b-ball.  Is this because some families are better?  Or, is it privilege and connections?
I suspect a bit of both.  In law enforcement, for instance, we try to convince our kids to do something else (like be a firefighter, for instance), but when the kids follow dad or mom, it ends up they do have an easier time getting "in" (they know the system from the inside; and they know the right people to know when jobs are open and what experience they needed to be competitive in the hiring process); and, once on the job, they have a lead on everyone else because they grew up around the techniques, politics, and history of being a cop, so they often have better skills on the street and in the boardroom.  The best I ever knew were sons and daughters, nieces and nephews of cops....

What do you think?  Does this carry over to sports fields, too?
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4 sentenced in Anchorage check-fraud scheme

4 sentenced in Anchorage check-fraud scheme | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Mail thefts and car break-ins let the group hijack Alaskans’ bank accounts and write dozens of fake checks, prosecutors said.
Rob Duke's insight:
Not as glamorous as investigating shootings, but there are dozens of these investigators working in Alaska at State and Federal Agencies....not a bad gig.
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Analysis | Government marijuana looks nothing like the real stuff. See for yourself.

Analysis | Government marijuana looks nothing like the real stuff. See for yourself. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A quick glance confirms it looks nothing like the commercial marijuana depicted above. While the real stuff is chunky and dark green, the government weed is stringy and light in color. It appears to be full of stems, which most consumers don't smoke. “It doesn’t resemble cannabis. It doesn’t smell like cannabis,” Sisley told PBS NewsHour last week.
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Islamic headscarf ban ruled legal in European workplaces

Islamic headscarf ban ruled legal in European workplaces | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Employers can ban visible symbols of faith as long as they enforce the policy fairly, a court in Europe ruled amid controversy over the Islamic veil.
Rob Duke's insight:
Because the U.S. covers a large area, we've institutionalized the idea that it's not o.k. to want to protect a local culture, but in Europe, it's still very important to protect what it means to be French or German, etc.  See for instance the word "heimatschutz" in German which means "homeland protection", but goes so far beyond what we mean when we talk about Homeland Security.
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LAPD: Latinos report fewer sex crimes amid immigration fears

LAPD: Latinos report fewer sex crimes amid immigration fears | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
LAPD: Latinos report fewer sex crimes amid immigration fears
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Friend of Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof sentenced to prison

Friend of Charleston church shooter Dylann Roof sentenced to prison | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Joey Meek has been sentenced to 27 months in prison for failing to report a crime and lying to the FBI.
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Home invasion and gun threat in Wasilla lead to high-speed chase, troopers say

A man who threatened a woman with her own gun during a Wasilla home invasion early Monday was arrested after a high-speed pursuit in the area, troopers said.

Troopers first received a report of the incident involving 28-year-old Jacob Gearing, who had forced his way into a home off Scatters Way, at about 2 a.m., according to an online dispatch.

"When the homeowner retrieved a firearm, (Gearing) disarmed her, then pointed the weapon at the homeowner and another occupant," troopers wrote.
Rob Duke's insight:
Why are cops ambivalent about gun control? Because most people don't have enough training to properly use it, thus most "home protection" guns either hurt those who they were meant to protect; or, get stolen during burglaries and other crimes....

**glad everyone was o.k. in this story.
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Drones are helping police, but not everyone is happy

Drones are helping police, but not everyone is happy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Nearly 20 pieces of construction equipment stolen from Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey were recovered on two Cecil County, Maryland, properties earlier this month.

It was called a landmark arrest, not because of the magnitude of the crime, but because of the method used to crack the case.

The Cecil County Sheriff's Office used an unmanned aerial vehicle, otherwise known as a drone, to find the missing equipment.
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Caitlin Mattingly's comment, March 21, 5:16 PM
I definitely see drones as an invasion of privacy and not as helpful as some may think
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Professional Management Drives Local Government Efficiency and Effectiveness | icma.org

Professional Management Drives Local Government Efficiency and Effectiveness | icma.org | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Professional local government management—through which elected officials hire a highly trained, nonpolitical chief executive to oversee the day-to-day operations of a community—makes a significant difference in that jurisdiction’s creditworthiness, efficiency, and ability to build community, according to a recent review conducted by ICMA, the International City/County Management Association. `   
A review of Moody’s Aaa-rated local governments in 2016 revealed that more than 66 percent of the 179 municipalities that earned Moody’s highest bond rating employ a professional manager. And an examination of the 40 jurisdictions that earned the coveted All America City designation from the National Civic League between 2013 and 2016 revealed that 75 percent of those communities were also professionally managed.
“The good news about the important role of professional management in ensuring a community’s creditworthiness and overall civic innovation comes as no surprise to ICMA,” says Executive Director Marc Ott. “The findings support what ICMA members and supporters have known all along: that professional local government management and the council-manager form of government—which combines strong political leadership and effective management capacity—makes an important difference in the quality of life for the residents in those communities that employ it.”
ICMA defines a professional manager as a local government chief appointed officer who, at a minimum:
Has direct responsibility for policy formulation on overall problems.
Has major responsibility for the preparation and administration of a jurisdiction’s operating and capital improvements budgets.
Exercises significant influence in the appointment of key administrative personnel.
Has an ongoing, direct relationship with the operating department heads on the implementation and administration of the programs.
Was hired as a result of her/his educational & administrative background and qualifications.
Is a member of ICMA and, therefore, must adhere to the ICMA Code of Ethics, which was adopted by ICMA in 1924 and which governs each member’s professional and personal conduct.
The high percent of Moody’s Aaa-rated municipalities and counties that employ a professional manager or administrator suggests a strong correlation between professional management and a community’s creditworthiness. Moody’s established its system of rating securities to provide investors with a simple method of evaluating the “future relative creditworthiness” of securities. Obligations, such as municipal bonds, that are rated Aaa are “judged to be of the highest quality, subject to the lowest level of credit risk,” according to the company’s Rating System and Definitions.
Since 1949, the National Civic League has recognized and celebrated the best in American civic innovation with the prestigious All-America City Award. The Award, bestowed to 10 communities annually (more than 500 in all), shines a spotlight on innovative efforts to bring all aspects of the community together to tackle the most pressing local issues.
These new findings reinforce the results reported in a 2011 operations efficiency benchmarking study, “Smarter, Faster, Cheaper,” published by IBM Global Business Services, which found that cities that operate under the council-manager form of government and thus have a professional local government manager are nearly 10 percent more efficient than those that operate under the mayor-council form.
In the IBM study, David Edwards, who then led the Smarter Government Campaign for IBM’s Public Sector Strategy and Innovation Practice, examined publicly available data for 100 of the largest cities in the United States. Edwards concluded that this finding
“…appears to validate the assumption underlying city manager forms of government, notably that investing executive authority in professional management shielded from direct political interference should yield more efficiently managed cities. To put it another way, even if a city operates within conditions most favorable for efficiency – no collective bargaining, geographically compact, and peaking on all scale curves – management choices can still lead a city down the path to inefficiency. It is both a sobering and encouraging conclusion.”
Rob Duke's insight:
Don't be fooled by the lure of the strong mayor.  Real managerial efficiency, effectiveness, economy, and equity are better attained through the use of professional managers.

Hire ICMA managers, and they'll be prepared to manage police and other functions according to the best practices in government.

You wouldn't hire judges who weren't respected members of the bar, so why would you hire day-to-day managers who didn't have the highest level of training?
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Rob Duke's comment, March 18, 9:32 PM
Don't get me wrong: you also need open and free elections, but those leaders perform the governance function and not the managerial function. They help manage a fair and open system in which everyone has a fair chance to influence policy. Managers also help people to have meaningful access to governance; and, provide information about how policy is implemented to elected officials (budgets, outcome measures, etc.), but generally are neutral on what policies are adopted (unless a clear inequality arises).
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A push to end modern 'debtors prisons' notched a win in Alabama

A push to end modern 'debtors prisons' notched a win in Alabama | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The rise of fee-based jailings has driven stories of lives ruined ─ lost jobs, crippling debt, spiraling poverty ─ and civil rights lawsuits.
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Why it may be increasingly hard to find police officers

Why it may be increasingly hard to find police officers | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Several of the nation's police departments are desperately losing manpower with decreasing numbers of officers and recruits.
Rob Duke's insight:
Yup, that is what it feels like sometimes....
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Boan White's comment, March 19, 10:20 PM
I completely agree that Law enforcement is becoming a less desirable career choice due to diminishing pay, high risk, and of course a recent bad rap. But I don't see any plausible solution to the decrease in people applying to the police force.
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Authorities serve search warrant in connection with Delphi murder case

Authorities serve search warrant in connection with Delphi murder case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
DELPHI, Ind. – Indiana State Police, the FBI and Carroll County sheriff’s deputies are serving a search warrant Friday in connection with the murders of two Delphi teens.
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Former Power Ranger Pleads Guilty to Samurai Sword Killing

Former Power Ranger Pleads Guilty to Samurai Sword Killing | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Ricardo Medina, the actor who played the Red Lion Ranger in Power Rangers Wild Force from 2002 to 2003, has pleaded guilty to killing his roommate, Josh Sutter, with a samurai sword. Medina, who initially claimed he was acting in self-defense, pleaded to voluntary manslaughter and now faces six years in prison. He had initially been charged with murder, which, if convicted, would have carried a sentence of 26 years to life.
Rob Duke's insight:
Second power ranger to go to jail for killing someone...weird.
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EMT dead after being run over by own stolen ambulance in New York

EMT dead after being run over by own stolen ambulance in New York | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A person is under arrest.
Rob Duke's insight:
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Sessions Says Obama Marijuana Memo Is 'Valid'

Sessions Says Obama Marijuana Memo Is 'Valid' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Attorney general says he "may have some different ideas" but suggests DOJ can't fully crack down on states.
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Analysis | Here’s the latest data on the federal war on drugs

Analysis | Here’s the latest data on the federal war on drugs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington sparked a dramatic shift in federal marijuana prosecutions.
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