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Crime Increases in Sacramento After Deep Cuts to Police Force - New York Times

Crime Increases in Sacramento After Deep Cuts to Police Force - New York Times | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
New York TimesCrime Increases in Sacramento After Deep Cuts to Police ForceNew York TimesBut each year brought more bad news for this city's Police Department.
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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Ex-Marine on death row says jurors should have been told more about PTSD

Ex-Marine on death row says jurors should have been told more about PTSD | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals will decide whether John Thuesen deserves a new trial in the 2009 killing of his girlfriend and her brother.
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From Theorist to Activist

From Theorist to Activist | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How a philosophy professor with "monklike tendencies" became a radical advocate for prison reform.
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Video Shows Florida Suspect Chewing Off Fingertips in Attempt to Avoid Identification, Police Say

Disturbing video shows a man in Florida chewing the skin off of his fingertips in what police said was an attempt to avoid identification. The footage was recorded by a camera inside a patrol car, ...
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Affordable Obamacare in California a Resounding Success

Affordable Obamacare in California a Resounding Success | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The study is the third in the series that started last 2013. It’s objectives revolved around knowing how the new law affects the lives of its dependents.

“For people that didn’t have health insurance, California has been very successful in enrolling two-thirds of that group. But the group that is left is a harder-to-reach group,” stated senior vice president Mollyann Brodie from the Kaiser Family Foundation, which released the survey’s results.
Rob Duke's insight:

In California, the elected to have their own plan (they already had an insurance commissioner, so this made a great deal of sense for them: also, they had advanced medicare and medical, so they spent a good bit of state money on health care, anyway).  Under the California run system, a Bronze plan runs about $446/mo. for a median age/median income family of four (minus an $82 mo. tax credit for a total of $364/mo.).  In contrast, the median income/age family pays: $800 with no subsidies for a comparable plan (if you live in Anchorage or Fairbanks).

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Jay Fulk's comment, August 2, 9:52 PM
I'm sure glad that it is helping someone because it completely screwed me over. I was paying just under $500 a month to Assurant Health for my family plan. We had a $2,000 deductible and then it paid 80% up to an OOP maximum of $10,000. It was not a great plan, but it was good enough and affordable. I was kicked off of this plan after obamacare rolled out and went to sign up for a new one. The cheapest plan was $900 a month with much worse benefits. This plan would of had a deductible of $5,000 and an OOP maximum of $15,000. I cannot afford nearly $1,000 every month. So, we are uninsured right now.
Rob Duke's comment, August 3, 3:33 AM
ouch. yeah. It's also age based so for my age, it would be over $2k month with pretty big OOP.
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Texas Attorney General indicted for felony securities fraud, prosecutor says

Texas Attorney General indicted for felony securities fraud, prosecutor says | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A grand jury has indicted Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on felony securities fraud charges that accuse the Republican of misleading investors before he became the state’s top law enforcement officer, a special prosecutor said on Saturday.
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"Ban the box" removes questions about criminal record from job applications

"Ban the box" removes questions about criminal record from job applications | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
"Ban the box," which prevents employers from asking job seekers about their criminal records, is gaining in popularity. The goal is to give ex-offenders a fair chance at landing employment by delaying questions about a criminal past until further in the hiring process.
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Simon to expand restorative justice - Canberra CityNews

Simon to expand restorative justice - Canberra CityNews | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SIMON Corbell says the ACT Government will expand restorative justice to include adult victims and offenders from 2016. Simon confirmed that the Restorativ
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New Research Shows that Teen Marijuana Use is Declining

New Research Shows that Teen Marijuana Use is Declining | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
As laws prohibiting marijuana become less punitive, the question, “What about the kids?” becomes more pressing to parents and other adults.
We at the Drug Policy Alliance urge young people
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JonHochendoner's comment, August 1, 12:44 AM
Be open and honest in educating these kids. Scare campaigns and propaganda, as we've seen in the past, is ineffective and damaging. Kids and teenagers are intelligent, they can make better decisions with research-backed information.
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Cleaning up

Cleaning up | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Consequently, people like Ms von der Heyde have some tough decisions to make. She is unwilling to raise prices to pass the extra costs along to customers, as London is already expensive. So pay differentials may have to go, meaning that senior employees won’t get wage rises in line with the lowest-paid. The hospitality industry already employs a younger workforce than any other big sector (about one-third are under 25); many hotels and bars will hire more youngsters, who do not qualify for the new living wage until they are 25 years old. That should at least help to reduce youth unemployment, currently 16%.  
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The Murders Don't Stop - War on Drugs Responsible for Outrageous Death Toll in Mexico

The Murders Don't Stop - War on Drugs Responsible for Outrageous Death Toll in Mexico | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
When I first shook hands with Felipe de la Cruz Sandoval this winter outside of the Mexican Consulate in NYC, images of my one of my favorite tios sprung to mind, creating an immediate sense of kinshi
Rob Duke's insight:

I was traveling throughout western Mexico in the Spring of 2006 and saw that Felipe Calderon's Presidential campaign to get tough on drug traffickers was being received well by the voters.  I also never had any perception of danger towards me as an American and the streets were relatively safe.  I would not travel there now.  

 

Even though Presidents in Mexico serve only 1 five-year term, Mexico is still plagued by this unfortunate policy change.

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Boozing it up

Boozing it up | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Who really drinks the most alcohol?TO JUDGE by national averages, Belarus, Moldova and Russia are the biggest drinkers in the world, quaffing between 15 to 18 litres...
Rob Duke's insight:

Compare Saudi Arabia (total prohibition) to the U.S. (mostly legal, but regulated).

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Homeland Security Today: NEW - What is the Most Secure Web Browser?

Homeland Security Today: NEW - What is the Most Secure Web Browser? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Three security strategies
 
Minimize damage. The browser is going to be penetrated, but it doesn’t generally contain much sensitive information. Compartmentalize your environment to prevent attackers from accessing sensitive data and resources directly from the compromised browser.
 
Contain the attack. The initial infection isn’t where the real damage happens. However, attackers use it to launch follow-on attacks on ever more useful and privileged accounts and devices. Ensure that attackers can’t use the browser as a beachhead to expand their attacks into the rest of the network.
 
Automate recovery. After detecting a breach it can take significant time and effort to lock down the affected machine and restore things to a safe state. This is expensive, and delays might give the attacker time to move on before the infection is cleared. Also, it tends to limit recovery to cases where an infection has been definitively detected. If recovery can be made quick and cheap enough, it can be done when there is even a suspicion of infection. Better yet, the system can be recovered to a safe state very frequently even if nothing has been detected to remove any advanced or zero-day malware.
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Provide sidewalks and enticing, pedestrian oriented streetscapes | ULI Building Healthy Places Toolkit

Provide sidewalks and enticing, pedestrian oriented streetscapes | ULI Building Healthy Places Toolkit | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
EVIDENCE BASED STRATEGIES
Build sidewalks in all new communities to encourage walking and to help keep pedestrians safe.
Include well-marked crosswalks, special pavers, and curb extensions to visually highlight pedestrians and slow traffic.
Light streets, trails, and public spaces to minimize dark and unsafe areas.
BEST PRACTICE STRATEGIES
Maximize transparency of facades at ground level—for instance, with windows—to increase visual interest and promote walkability.
Provide amenities such as bike racks, street lamps, public art, benches, and bus shelters to turn sidewalks into more appealing spaces.
Include street trees and benches along sidewalks to provide shade and respite for pedestrians and joggers.
Within large projects, provide maps and signage oriented to pedestrians—with mileage and key destination points in the area—to help people feel at ease about walking and biking.
Rob Duke's insight:

Don't forget how good urban planning can reduce opportunities for crime and accidents.  Also, if the built environment is inviting, people will spend more time in it and that will give you built in eyes and ears, which tends to discourage crime.

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Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, August 3, 5:02 PM

Don't forget how good urban planning can reduce opportunities for crime and accidents.  Also, if the built environment is inviting, people will spend more time in it and that will give you built in eyes and ears, which tends to discourage crime.

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Interpol Is Now Training Police To Fight Crime On 'The Darknet'

Interpol Is Now Training Police To Fight Crime On 'The Darknet' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The arrest, trial and conviction of Silk Road founder Ross Ulbricht — and his sentence of life in prison — was a stark reminder that 21st ...
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Here's What Your Eyes Look Like When You Take Different Drugs | VICE | United States

We asked a medical expert, and then snapped some photos of people on drugs just to make sure.
Rob Duke's insight:

As a rule of thumb: Stimulants dilate pupils (not reactive to light) and raise vital signs; Cannabis raises vitals somewhat and dilates pupils (but they remain reactive to light); Depressants lower vital signs; Opiates constrict pupils (not reactive to light) and really lower vitals.  Combinations usually split the difference.  So the HUGE pupil of the Stimulant when combine with an Opiate will go back to normal size, but not be reactive to light.  The Marijuana/Alcohol user will have normal vitals, normal pupils, but likely won't be able to cross their eyes (cannabis causes "lack of convergence).

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Jocelyn Stoller's curator insight, August 2, 11:52 PM

As a rule of thumb: Stimulants dilate pupils (not reactive to light) and raise vital signs; Cannabis raises vitals somewhat and dilates pupils (but they remain reactive to light); Depressants lower vital signs; Opiates constrict pupils (not reactive to light) and really lower vitals.  Combinations usually split the difference.  So the HUGE pupil of the Stimulant when combine with an Opiate will go back to normal size, but not be reactive to light.  The Marijuana/Alcohol user will have normal vitals, normal pupils, but likely won't be able to cross their eyes (cannabis causes "lack of convergence).

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LA's #100days100nights Gang Murder Bet Is Probably Bullshit

LA's #100days100nights Gang Murder Bet Is Probably Bullshit | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
You don’t need to pray for LA.
Rob Duke's insight:

...or maybe not b.s., too....boots on the ground are worried....

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Is The Moon To Blame?

Dear Mona,

Do hospitals experience a larger number of patient admissions to the emergency room and/or labor and delivery during full moons? My nurse friend claims that this is a fact.

Brian, 34, San Ramon, California

Dear Brian,

When there’s a full moon, hospitalization rates do not increase (or decrease for that matter). That pretty definitive conclusion is based on several studies I’ve read this week, all of which tested the hypothesis that the moon affects our health.
Rob Duke's insight:

....but it sure seems like it.  When I was working the street in L.A., we also seemed to go batpoo crazy during the Santa Ana winds, too....

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BREAKING- Appellate Court denies petition in Fairbanks Four case on sealed evidence

BREAKING- Appellate Court denies petition in Fairbanks Four case on sealed evidence | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FAIRBANKS- The Court of Appeals has denied a petition meant to keep alleged statements out of court that support an alternate confession in the case of the Fairbanks Four.

In a ruling obtained by the Newscenter this afternoon, the Court of Appeals declined to take the petition and further ruled that alleged statements made by Jason Wallace under attorney-client privilege could indeed be brought into the Superior Court should the Judge rule they are admissible.

Contained in the three page response, it is confirmed that Wallace (referred to as J.W.) "made statements to an investigator working for his attorney which, if true, would tend to exculpate four defendants who were previously convicted of the same crime that J.W. described."

Wallace's attorney Jason Gazewood has fought to keep those allegations sealed and out of court as the four men Kevin Pease, Eugene Vent, Marvin Roberts, and George Frese continue forward with their litigation in a post-conviction relief filing.

Yesterday Superior Court Judge Paul Lyle ruled to lift the temporary stay based on the Appellate Court's decision.
We will have more details to follow.
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Jay Fulk's comment, August 2, 9:55 PM
I did not live in Fairbanks with Hartman was murdered, but I have taken a special interest into this case over the last few years. I cannot help but think that there is some underlying reason why the confession should be kept out of court. Is someone hiding or covering up something that they do not want out in the open? I can't help but think that way because that confession, if true, sets free four innocent men. This ruling by the Appellate Court definitely makes things interesting now. I look forward to seeing what comes next.
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Is #100Days100Nights Just a Threatening Hashtag or a Full-Blown LA Gang War? | VICE | United States

But conversations with locals, gang experts, and law enforcement suggest that, so far at least, the social media threat is just that—a mostly internet-based phenomenon, albeit one that is having some ripple effects on the street.

"Social media takes a big toll on the community when everybody is seeing it and everybody is paying attention to it," Reynaldo Reaser, executive director of Reclaiming America's Communities through Empowerment (RACE), a South LA–based gang intervention organization, tells VICE. "Law enforcement is paying attention to it to where they have a level of concern for violence in the area, so they put out a tactical alert on this."

Rightly so. But is the online game actually resulting in an increased body count? The LA Times reports that a series of shootings in South LA left one dead and 12 wounded this past weekend, but also that the bloodshed was largely confined to the city's most traditionally dangerous neighborhoods and did not represent a departure from the normal amount of gang violence.
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JonHochendoner's comment, August 1, 12:35 AM
It should be monitored but if it is a legit contest, how will the winner be determined? If these gangs are enemies they're not going to come together and tally up the stats.
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Attorney general says tribal protective orders must be enforced

Attorney general says tribal protective orders must be enforced | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Attorney General Craig Richards in an opinion issued Thursday said that law enforcement officers must enforce tribal protective orders just as if they came from an Alaska court.
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Carson: 'Term limits create more opportunities for fresh ideas'

Carson: 'Term limits create more opportunities for fresh ideas' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Carson: 'Term limits create more opportunities for fresh ideas'
Rob Duke's insight:

As a City Manager with a few dealings in Sacramento, term limits meant that legislators are no longer in charge. Term limits shifts the power to lobbyists and the Sentor's/Assembly Person's professional staff.  California has the Line Item Veto, so much of the power has already been shifted to the governor (power of the purse); by enacting term limits, you also move the power of persuasion. Instead of researching and writing new laws/amending old ones in partnership with their constituents, the legislator never has the time to figure out what they should do (because they term out), so they begin to depend on the lobbyists to help them. Laws are now written by interest groups and not by your reps. When I in grad school, I felt this way too despite what my professors recommended. It took having to witness the impacts for me to change my mind.

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Jay Fulk's comment, August 2, 9:56 PM
I am a Ben Carson fan and he is absolutely right. Term limits should be set in place for every single office in our country. The creation of career politicians is exactly what is hurting our country right now. Give them two terms and then get new blood in there. Like he says, get some more fresh ideas in office.
Rob Duke's comment, August 3, 3:28 AM
It's a trite solution. The problem is the rules that allow parties and old-timers to get more power based upon seniority, but the solution isn't to make it to where there is no real seniority. If you do that, then you lose all the wisdom in the legislature. We already have Presidential Aggradizement and it's poor policy to increase that power imbalance.
Rob Duke's comment, August 3, 3:28 AM
aggrandizement....
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BBC News | MIDDLE EAST | Getting a drink in Saudi Arabia

BBC News | MIDDLE EAST | Getting a drink in Saudi Arabia | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
But, as in every country that has tried to ban alcohol, smuggling and trying to make drinks locally has become the alternatives for those who want to have a drink, or for those who want to profit from selling banned substances.
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DEA Chief says: "Marijuana probably not as dangerous as heroin, but I'm not an expert..."

DEA Chief says: "Marijuana probably not as dangerous as heroin, but I'm not an expert..." | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
On a recent policy call the new head of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Chuck Rosenberg, said marijuana is probably less dangerous than heroin. He went on to say, “I’m not an ex
Rob Duke's insight:

Wait? I thought Captain Obvious was already working for Hotels.com....

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JonHochendoner's comment, August 1, 12:39 AM
Wow. I thought Leonhart was bad. He's the head of the DEA and this is his statement. Where is the science?