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Former Brazilian Model Turned Beggar Stirs Debate on Racism · Global Voices

Former Brazilian Model Turned Beggar Stirs Debate on Racism · Global Voices | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Tall, blue-eyed and wrapped in a blanket while roaming the streets of Curitiba, Rafael Nunes, a former Brazilian model, has gained international attention after his picture and story went viral on Facebook and Twitter.
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Criminology and Economic Theory
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Two bodies found near pond where missing couple's car discovered earlier

Two bodies found near pond where missing couple's car discovered earlier | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Authorities in Georgia have issued an arrest warrant in connection with the case of a missing elderly couple who have not been seen since they responded to a Craigslist advertisement about a car. 
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Economic Freedom Does Not Necessarily Lead to Greater Tolerance

Economic Freedom Does Not Necessarily Lead to Greater Tolerance | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Open markets tend to lead to open minds, but not always, especially regarding race.
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The economics of optimism

The economics of optimism | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“THE lives of people in poor countries will improve faster in the next 15 years than at any other time in history. And their lives will improve more than anyone...
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Tension between urban and rural interests in development and beyond

Tension between urban and rural interests in development and beyond | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
By Tunç Soyer, Mayor of Seferihisar, Turkey Local governments: first line of defence against the most critical issues of humankind It is said that cities were first founded to meet people’s need fo...

Via Dr Lendy Spires, Jocelyn Stoller
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At Wasilla traffic stop, a flight, a fight and a mobile meth lab discovered

At Wasilla traffic stop, a flight, a fight and a mobile meth lab discovered | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska State Troopers say they discovered a mobile meth lab after a Wasilla man fled a traffic stop, then fought with the arresting officer.
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Better living through modern chemistry....

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How to “trick” people into caring about nature

How to “trick” people into caring about nature | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
M. Sanjayan talks to Salon about why conservation is in our own self-interest VIDEO
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...or just give the property rights to someone and let a market develop.  Countries that "give" the right to harvest elephant ivory, have a healthy elephant population, whereas countries that "protect" elephants are facing species extinction.  See the Coase Theorem:

http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1105&context=econ_fac

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The Parents Always Wondered Why Their Dog Attacked Their Baby Sitter, The Truth Is Disturbing!!

SHOCKING: Parents discover a horrifying truth about their son’s babysitter!
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John David Murphy's comment, January 25, 9:18 PM
Sometimes animals are smarter than we give them credit for....... I like the idea of recording what happens in your home if someone you barely know is in it.
Corbin Sandgren's comment, January 26, 1:35 AM
It was a good use of resources on the parents part to record the babysitter without her knowledge, but it is sad that it took so long for them to do so.
Kelly Logue's comment, Today, 1:30 AM
This is incredibly saddening and heartbreaking. I feel that if this had happened in other regions of the world, this baby sitter wouldn't have gotten 3 years in prison but something completely worse than that. Having said that, it could be the opposite in other regions too.
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Is there a microchip implant in your future?

Is there a microchip implant in your future? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Microchip implants like the ones pet owners use to track their dogs and cats could become commonplace in humans in the next decade.
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Jessica Ramos's comment, January 25, 11:57 PM
With many people out there doing bad things such as hacking systems, and stealing credit card information, I really worry about things like this. Our own government is know for spying on us. Why should we give them tool to do so? I understand the good side to this, but the bad outweighs it. By a lot.
Kyle May's comment, January 26, 3:09 AM
I agree there is a worry about security concerns but I don't see it as the bad outweights the good. We carry around a pocket GPS which *could* track out locations already, so how would this be much different? I don't know about anyone else, but my phone goes with me where-ever I am 24/7.
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Marijuana growers in Mexico are switching to producing heroin poppies as pot prices drop in the U.S.

Marijuana growers in Mexico are switching to producing heroin poppies as pot prices drop in the U.S. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Drug farmers in Mexico switch to poppies as pot prices drop
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Kyle May's comment, January 26, 3:14 AM
I can see why they are switching product, as legalization must be cutting into the market share that they've held for so long. Not to mention, the nature of Heroin leads for returning customers in greater quantities than Marijuana would ever. The buyer, once addicted, would feel the need to consume more Heroin to keep up the high. It's a revolving door for the Cartel, guaranteeing a returning customer.
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14-year-old girl films father’s sexual abuse with webcam

14-year-old girl films father’s sexual abuse with webcam | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Police were unable to arrest the man until his daughter was able to produce video proof of her allegations
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Heather Wiinikka's comment, January 26, 2:24 AM
See i do not think that is right because what if she would have never been able to get that evidence he would have gotten away with and been allowed to continue committed this horrible and could have developed more victims he just been arrested and investigated right away, because what if she never got that evidence and here father may have killed her or something all because no one would have done anything without the film. What a shame
Kelly Logue's comment, Today, 1:49 AM
The fact that this little girl had to have PROOF of the sexual abuse by her father to even get the police involved is terrifying. This shows the difference in the way regions are being run all over the world. In America, even an utter of something like this would have the police knocking down that dads door in a heartbeat.
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“SNL” brilliantly tackles gentrification: “You’re acting like someone put gluten in your muffin”

“SNL” brilliantly tackles gentrification: “You’re acting like someone put gluten in your muffin” | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Three friends discuss the changes to the "hood" and what it means to hang with their "b**ches" VIDEO
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Jessica Ramos's comment, January 25, 11:57 PM
I am not from city were gentrification is the trend, but my boyfriend is. He was raised in Brooklyn, NY most of his life and after reading this together, he tried to explain the pros and cons of gentrification. With gentrification, many streets are cleaned up and are made to look more pleasant. Cost of living goes up. The bad thing is that many low class communities are targeted, due to less money needed to be invested. In most cases these neighborhoods are dominated by African Americans. With this happening, many people are forced out of their houses, and many cannot afford other places. It is good from a business perspective. You have many new business, which create new jobs opportunities, and better housing options. On the other side of the issue, you have many poor families that are forced out of there homes when the property owner decides to sell his land to the companies in charge of the gentrification process. To make ends meet, those same people might be forced into looking for other options to make ends meet such as robbery and such. How can we make gentrification a win/win situation for everyone involved?
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S.F. takes new direction on homeless camps with 1-stop aid center

S.F. takes new direction on homeless camps with 1-stop aid center | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The plan being spearheaded by the San Francisco mayor’s point man on homelessness is to create a one-stop homeless aid center in the heart of the Mission District that’s unlike any seen in America. Usually, when an encampment is broken up, aid workers offer shelter beds and other assistance as the angry campers start heading for the hills. Some take the offers, but many wind up doing what happened in December when San Jose officials busted up the huge Jungle encampment — about half spread out like melted Jell-O into new camps. Cleanup efforts are also thwarted when campers who do land in housing feel alienated or guilty because they abandoned their street community — and they go back to it. [...] are neighborhoods aching to get rid of homeless camps that have been burgeoning as tech-driven housing costs and gentrification shove them into new urban nooks and crannies. “I don’t know how it would ever be possible to help me, and I don’t really trust the system much, but hey — if they can get me and my friends into some kind of center like they’re talking about, we might give it a try,” Gember, 33, said as he tied off the entrance to his tent on San Bruno Avenue to go forage for food. Once in the center, the goal is to move people within three to 10 days to permanent rooms, rehabilitation centers, bus rides home or anything else that can lead to stable lives — and will stick. From creating thousands of counseling-enriched supportive housing units to the periodic Project Homeless Connect daylong, one-stop help fairs, the city has long gone the extra yard to help its street people. The always nettling challenge has been to deal with acutely troubled people who resent the constraints of shelters, distrust government and are afraid to leave their survival routines in the street — and legally can’t be forced to take help. Bending over backward to convince an indigent to take offered assistance seems counterintuitive, but studies show that moving a chronically homeless person out of the gutter actually saves cities money. According to the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness and the United Way, someone living hard-core on the street costs more than $60,000 a year in police busts, emergency ambulance rides and the like, compared with about $20,000 in a government-funded supportive housing unit with counselors on-site to provide help. Several city agencies, including the Police Department and the Human Services Agency, will participate, along with nonprofits such as the Mission Neighborhood Resource Center and the Homeless Youth Alliance. The units will not just be lumped into huge complexes, but spread throughout other developments and smaller residence hotels away from traditionally troubled areas such as the Tenderloin — and they will come with added counseling, a crucial element for helping people stay inside. The new units are also to be partly funded by private donations, and the nonprofit HomeBase is conducting an exhaustive study to locate available spots for the city to lease. Street counselors have long said that if you can deal with whole communities instead of individuals, the whole process of getting to a stable life moves more quickly — and Dufty found this out firsthand in 2013 when the then-biggest encampment in the city, a sprawling mound of tents and trash at the Interstate 280 on-ramp alongside the Caltrain station, was broken up. All 30 campers were put up in a church auditorium for almost a week instead of just being offered housing vouchers or shelter beds, and within days all but five had been moved into permanent spots. A similar effort involving Pathways to Housing in Philadelphia has moved 450 severely mentally ill homeless people inside over six years, and the one-stop Connections Housing center in San Diego reduced homelessness downtown by more than half after it opened in 2013. “It’s actually a brilliant idea to bring in a displaced community of people,” Chris Simiriglia, Pathways’ executive director, said of San Francisco’s plan. Ray Bramson, homeless services manager for San Jose, likes the concept of one-stop help complexes such as the Navigation Center, although he warns it can be hard maintaining funding and that getting all the agencies to coordinate can be “like herding cats.”

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Megan Earle's comment, January 26, 1:19 AM
This idea is fascinating to me. Before coming to college I would see homeless people on the street and criticize them for not going to a shelter and getting their lives together. I've since come to understand the unique subculture that is homelessness. This article helps to illustrate that these people do want help but without having to abandon loved ones, pets, and belongings.
Megan Earle's comment, January 26, 1:21 AM
I think the approach this new shelter is taking is a big step in decreasing the homeless population by allowing them to go and bring everything they have and help get them on the path they want to be on.
Heather Wiinikka's comment, January 26, 2:31 AM
I think this approach will decrease the homeless population and the fact it will help these people change there lives and help them be more of a successful life.
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Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F.

Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Psychology studies suggest rising wealth means more jerks in S.F. If it seems that San Franciscans are getting more entitled and self-absorbed, a series of psychology studies performed at UC Berkeley indicates there could be a scientific reason: the city’s increasing wealth. Paul Piff, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior at UC Irvine (he moved from UC Berkeley just a few weeks ago), has spent the past decade conducting about 50 studies on how wealthy peop
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How Economists Came to Dominate the Conversation

How Economists Came to Dominate the Conversation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A search of the archives of The New York Times finds that the use of the term “economist” rose in the past century, outpacing “historian.”
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Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up

Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Since 2000, the middle-class share of households has narrowed as more have fallen to the bottom of the economic ladder.
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Brazil in 'worst water crisis'

Brazil in 'worst water crisis' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Brazil's Environment Minister Izabella Teixeira says the country's most populous states are experiencing their worst water crisis since 1930.

Via Dr Lendy Spires, Jocelyn Stoller
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The royal road to ruin

The royal road to ruin | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
In a series following our print article on conflicting approaches to free speech after the terrorist attacks in Paris on January 7th, our correspondents offer more...
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Another in the Good Life series: Thailand: Deface a bank note; wear black on the King’s birthday; stay sitting during the national anthem…in Thailand these 'crimes' could land you in jail. The first in a series of in-depth online articles examining the threats to freedom of speech around the world...

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The man of make-believe

The man of make-believe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
OVER the years, all sorts were tried. One was a navy football coach; one ran a fencing company. One was a jobbing actor in police dramas; one lived in the New York...
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Some insight into the good life "American-style"...

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Kelly Logue's comment, Today, 1:22 AM
This I feel like expresses the Western society's view on the good life. This article gives this romantic view on what all you need in the world is, which for western society would be a big family, home cooked meals and laughter with lots and lots of love. This obviously isn't the same for every region in the world but this depicts the western one very well.
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Ivory mafia: how criminal gangs are killing Africa's elephants

Ivory mafia: how criminal gangs are killing Africa's elephants | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Shortly before 11 am on the last Saturday in May, a heavily laden white Mitsubishi truck pulled into the Fuji Motors East Africa car dealership in an industrial neighbourhood on the northern edge of Mombasa.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Corbin Sandgren's comment, January 26, 1:25 AM
Africa has an issue with corruption these gangs pay off officers, judges, detectives, shipping agents, custom officers, park rangers, and freight forwarders to cover themselves in case a shipment is compromised. Also the bosses cannot be pin pointed because they pay people to do their work.
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Demographics of Sexual Fantasy

Demographics of Sexual Fantasy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Demographics of Sexual Fantasy: Analyzing the authorship of 290K erotic stories
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Which Cities Sleep In, And Which Get To Work Early

Which Cities Sleep In, And Which Get To Work Early | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I’m not a morning person, so I appreciate living in New York. The workday here starts later than in any other American city, and about half an hour later than in the U.S. as a whole. A decade or so...
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Kaitlyn Evans's comment, January 26, 1:44 AM
I found this article very interesting because I work a completely different schedule than the average worker. I have to be at work by 5:15am at the gym on campus to open. However, like it was stated in the article, in Alaska people normally get to work by 8:00am. I find this true. My bosses at the gym come rolling in around 8ish. I also work at an internship at a law firm where our hours are from 8am-5pm. However, one attorney doesn't come in until 9am, and another attorney rarely comes in before 10am. With the type of work they are dealing with, constantly meeting with clients, running back and forth from the court house, I probably wouldn't come in until 9am so I was well rested. This article was interesting to see a bunch of cities in America compared to one another.
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11 Months After Marijuana Legalization, Here's What's Happening to Mexican Cartels

11 Months After Marijuana Legalization, Here's What's Happening to Mexican Cartels | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There's never been a better reason to legalize it.
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Christopher L. Baca's comment, January 25, 6:40 PM
From firsthand experience with growing up in neighborhoods directly affected by the growth of an illegal marijuana usage, I find that the idea of legalization with certain restraints is a wonderful idea. As stated in the article, by legalizing the product, we not only cut the import and profit of cartels, but we also open a new venue that provides a new economic gain for U.S. citizens.
Riley Landeis's comment, January 25, 11:31 PM
The legalization of marijuana is a giant step forward for the US in terms of creating a taxable product as well as cutting down on the violence and illegal activities that come with the cartels
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Why wealthy Americans’ delusions about the poor are so dangerous

Why wealthy Americans’ delusions about the poor are so dangerous | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Regressive state and local tax policies don’t just harm the working class -- they can ruin entire economies
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Jessica Ramos's comment, January 25, 11:58 PM
I feel like the economic system is set for the rich to stay rich. We talk about everyone having an opportunity of going from drags to riches, but what are the real chances of that? With a growing population, we have more competition. Everyone inherits their parent's economic status, one percent being in charge of the world's economy. The majority of the population is lower class, meaning there is very little chance into getting in the class of the elite.
Megan Earle's comment, January 26, 12:45 AM
This article goes well with this week's discussion of "the Good Life." This illustrates how even within one nation, the definition can vary from person to person. While low income families are struggling to get by and are looking at the top 1% as the example of "the Good Life," the rich are wrongly believing the the poor have it easier because they have lower taxes. While this isn't true, its hows how even topics such as tax policies can play into a culture's definition of "the Good Life."
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Living with a record: How past crimes may drive job seekers into poverty | PBS NewsHour

Living with a record: How past crimes may drive job seekers into poverty | PBS NewsHour | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Applicants with criminal backgrounds, including those with nonviolent criminal convictions or even arrests, are increasingly being driven into poverty. Even if it has been years since they've served time for past criminal infractions, those applying for jobs are often unable to find work -- especially in a climate of extreme job competition. NewsHour's Stephen Fee reports. Continue reading →

Via Darcy Delaproser
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Heather Wiinikka's comment, January 26, 2:28 AM
It seems for people that have past records to gain employment, which i think if it isn't a horrible crime they should be allowed a chance to proof themselves. Crimes do drive job seekers into poverty because they can not get a job because of their record they can not get hired so there for they have no pay check and no means to provide and support themdelves