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Police: Pastor of Fort Worth-Area Church Killed - ABC News

Police: Pastor of Fort Worth-Area Church Killed - ABC News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ABC NewsPolice: Pastor of Fort Worth-Area Church KilledABC NewsA pastor in suburban Fort Worth was killed Monday by an attacker who rammed a car into a church wall, chased the pastor and beat him with an electric guitar, police said.
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The Rebirth of Rehabilitation in Juvenile and Criminal Justice: New Wine in New Bottles by Mark R. Fondacaro, J.D., Ph.D., Stephen Koppel, Megan O'Toole, Joanne Crain :: SSRN

The Rebirth of Rehabilitation in Juvenile and Criminal Justice: New Wine in New Bottles by Mark R. Fondacaro, J.D., Ph.D., Stephen Koppel, Megan O'Toole, Joanne Crain :: SSRN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
These are indeed exciting times for those of us interested in the reform of our juvenile and adult criminal justice systems. Innovation is in the air among leg
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New Wine in New Bottles: The Need to Sketch a Therapeutic Jurisprudence 'Code' of Proposed Criminal Processes and Practices by David B. Wexler :: SSRN

New Wine in New Bottles: The Need to Sketch a Therapeutic Jurisprudence 'Code' of Proposed Criminal Processes and Practices by David B. Wexler :: SSRN | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
La versión española de este artículo se puede encontrar en: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2466124.

This essay forms t
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After FBI domain expires, seized Megaupload.com serves up porn

After FBI domain expires, seized Megaupload.com serves up porn | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
CIRFU.Net domain bought on GoDaddy by "black-hat SEO" operator—malware hijinks ensue.
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Anchorage woman sentenced for HIPAA violation

Anchorage woman sentenced for HIPAA violation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
KTVA Anchorage CBS 11 - First in Alaska. News, weather, sports, business and entertainment in High Definition.
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Patriot Act Surveillance Provisions Expire After Senate Showdown

Patriot Act Surveillance Provisions Expire After Senate Showdown | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The NSA's authority to collect bulk telephone metadata under the Patriot Act expired at midnight after senators were unable to make a deal.
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Rescooped by Rob Duke from Government Officials and crime , rarely convicted or charged! innocent until proven innocent "lol" then sentenced to retirement with pension and Hilton jail time if any is given!
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Judges demand answers after children die in cancer vaccine trial

Judges demand answers after children die in cancer vaccine trial | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The trials involved young tribal girls who were given shots of Merck's Gardasil vaccine and Cervarix. Campaigners have also asked judges to investigate trials of the new drug Gardasil 9.

Via Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Marianne PokeBunny Lenaerts's curator insight, May 31, 10:24 PM

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2908963/Judges-demand-answers-children-die-controversial-cancer-vaccine-trial-India.html

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, June 1, 5:36 AM

SIS THIS VACCINE GET TESTED ON ANIMALS FIRST AND IF SO SIS IT GIVE THE ANIMALS CANCER AND THEY JUST WROTE IT OFF AND DECIDED TO TRY IT ON THE LESS FORTUNATE HUMANS THAT HAE NEED OF VACCINE INCLUDING CHILDREN. IF WE NEVER KNOW FROM WHENCE OUR HELP COME WHY IS THE GOVERNMENT ALLOWING ELIMINATION BT VACCINE OR NOT!

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'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge

'Love locks' to be removed from Paris bridge | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

"The city of Paris will start removing padlocks from the Pont des Arts on Monday, effectively ending the tourist tradition of attaching 'love locks' to the bridge. For years, visitors have been attaching locks with sentimental messages to the bridge in symbolic acts of affection. Some further seal the deal by throwing keys into the Seine River below.  It was considered charming at first, but the thrill wore off as sections of fencing on the Pont des Arts crumbled under the locks' weight. The bridge carries more than 700,000 locks with an estimated combined weight roughly the same as 20 elephants."


Via Seth Dixon, Aki Puustinen
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 9:56 AM

unit 1

Marc Meynardi's curator insight, Today, 1:53 AM

This tradition is particularly appreciated by Chinese tourist. Annecy got a bride called "lLe Pont des Amours" where love locks are regularly removed.

Leslie G Perry's curator insight, Today, 8:32 AM

I LOVE Seth Dixon's insight on this and how it figures in with Design Technology. What mark do we leave and why? What are the unintended consequences of leaving out mark?

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Graffiti, tombstones, love locks, monuments...each of these are manifestations of people's desire to have some tangible impact on the landscape.  Something that manifests a connection to place in a profoundly personal way. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do people want leave a mark on places that are meaningful to them?  When do you think that they that these markers are appropriate or inappropriate?  Do we have more of a 'right' to mark some places than others? Why do many oppose these personal marks on the landscape?

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Ex-Fifa vice president Jack Warner swallows Onion spoof

Ex-Fifa vice president Jack Warner swallows Onion spoof | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Football executive uses story from satirical website as basis for defending Fifa against US
Rob Duke's insight:

Um? ok....

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American Justice??????? We've been played........

American Justice???????  We've been played........ | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

American Justice???????  We've been played........ 


Via Randy L. Dixon Rivera
Rob Duke's insight:

Always consider the source, but it's an interesting question: is the Holder Memo reasonable in this?  Should we be interested in collateral damage?  Should we reward companies that cooperate and later admit guilt after fixing the problems?  Should this include only fines and no imprisonment?

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The Missing Statistics of Criminal Justice

The Missing Statistics of Criminal Justice | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
An abundance of data has fueled the reform movement, but from prisons to prosecutors, crucial questions remain unquantified.
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Texas Legislature Passes Historic Bill Decriminalizing Truancy

Texas Legislature Passes Historic Bill Decriminalizing Truancy | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Failure to Attend School, or “truancy” would no longer be a criminal offense under a historic bill that passed both chambers of the Texas Legislature on Saturday, May 30.
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Eric Lee's comment, June 1, 1:31 AM
I'm surprised that truancy is even a thing to begin with. Not only is it bad enough that there is a such thing as public schools, but to think that you can actually go to jail for not going to these schools is draconian to say the least. These kinds of victimless crimes should of course have been decriminalized but it's a shame that there was even such law to begin with.
Clay Faris's comment, June 1, 4:35 AM
^ Eric stole my thunder. Well said. Truancy is a status offense. If kids don't want to go to school (or their parents don't want to make them) that is their problem. They will pay for it down the road one way or another. I fail to see why this story is such a big deal.
Rob Duke's comment, June 1, 4:37 AM
I guess in Texas it was still a crime. I've always lived in a system where it was just a status offense. I can't imagine sending a kid to jail for skipping school....
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In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances

In Norway, A Prison Built On Second Chances | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The inmates have private cells and dine with the guards. Norway spends three times as much as the U.S. per prisoner. Norwegians say it pays off, with less than half the U.S. recidivism rate.
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SeaBoundRhino's comment, May 31, 6:19 PM
This topic on how we should treat our prisoners is very controversial. We all want and expect to be treated with respect and empathy, however when someone breaks the laws it seems as if all those expectations go out the window. I don't know that the world is full of good or bad people, I think the world is full of good and bad decisions. So quickly we define a person by their actions and sometimes it is true, but not everyone can be defined by just their actions alone.
Peter Krieger's comment, May 31, 9:12 PM
This is a topic that is very talked about and discussed all the time. This is an interesting approach to incarceration but for them it seems to be working. To me it seems as if they are trying to reintegrate the prisoner into society, so rather than locking them up for 23 hours a day, they have them attend classes, watch tv and various other things. Now one could look at that and say, well whats the punishment there? Most prisoners could have had worse home situations then in the maximum security prison, which is weird to think about. As discussed in the article, I do not feel that something like this wold be successful and or beneficial in United States. It's a unique strategy used by the Norwegians, but one that they feel is beneficial and the pros outweigh the cons.
Vincent Zamora's comment, Today, 2:31 AM
I could not agree more with the way Norway handles this approach in rehabilitating their prisoners with a positive attitude for changing. Take for instance that they are not risking anymore or less then we are, nor are they spending less but rather more then we do on our prisoners. they treat them like a person rather than an evil person or criminal. True they made a mistake but they are aware that they have made a mistake and where they are and why. The cost and efforts are worth it by far. Just look at the results, they speak for themselves. They are in an environment that does not constantly remind them that they are criminal and surrounded by dangerous men with nothing to look forward to. They are in a more tranquil environment much like an actual rehab center that keeps them focused on more positive activities and skills they can take with them. As to the United States we make it a point that prisoners know they are in a prison, they have lost their rights, and are almost treated like animals. It is a constant reminder that they are in hell and surrounded by danger and the only way to keep from being a target is to be more dangerous then the next person. There are programs for education and skills in prisons in the US but the most common is how to come out a better criminal.
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What’s in a name?

What’s in a name? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Still doing the right thing, he’s sure MORE than a quarter of a century has passed since Spike Lee made “Do the Right Thing”—a film about racial tensions...
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Marei Benton's comment, May 31, 5:16 PM
I think I may have hallucinated mid-article... Did it just say that Spike Lee's new movie about inner city Chicago is going to be based upon Aristophanes' Lysistrata?? Did I really read that or did I perhaps have a stroke mid-sentence somewhere?
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Defendant backs out of plea agreement in Western Alaska platinum mining case

Defendant backs out of plea agreement in Western Alaska platinum mining case | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A defendant in a major Western Alaska pollution case has changed his mind and is withdrawing from his agreement to plead guilty, according to filings in U.S. District Court in Anchorage this week.
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L.A. County's jail population at lowest number in three years

L.A. County's jail population at lowest number in three years | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Probation officials credit Prop 47 for restoring jail population to pre-realignment levels in a matter of weeks. And they expect the drop to continue.

Via Jerry Ibarra, Dorothy Retha Cook
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Jerry Ibarra's curator insight, January 25, 11:22 AM

 Waiting for the next shoe to drop in California. The effect of the crime rate after release. Theoretically the Mental Health Parity Act and Addiction Equity Act  coupled with the Affordable Care Act will provide many services for the formerly incarcerated to help curb crime since many crimes have underlying addiction and mental health issues, The federal prison system is now allowing for rehabilitation and treatment of mental health prisoners, http://www.patrickjkennedy.net/articles/thousands-prisoners-treated-mental-illness#sthash.yGsYNrFG.  ;

 

California has struggled with defining what the word "rehabilitation" means in the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation institution. Hopefully change is on it's way, more effective treatment before release not after. 

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For Now, the Supreme Court Has Little to Say About the Issue of Online Harassment | VICE | United States

For Now, the Supreme Court Has Little to Say About the Issue of Online Harassment | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Today's decision properly recognizes that the law has for centuries required the government to prove criminal intent before putting someone in jail. That principle is especially important when a prosecution is based on a defendant's words. The Internet does not change this long-standing rule. While today's decision insists on fairness, it is not a license to threaten, which remains illegal when properly proved.
Rob Duke's insight:

I personally don't buy it.  These guys do this to threaten and intimidate and FB is not like him telling a buddy that he hates his Ex.  This type of communication is out there and has ways of connecting to his Ex.  This also gives an incentive for a potential attacker to make threats and then say "JK, that was art" and then the cops not be able to do anything.

The responsible reaction is for state legislatures to take up the task of drafting law that recognizes True Threat Doctrine, but specifically defines these type of threats as something different.  The intent shouldn't be required to show the threat was intended to be followed up on, just a presumed intent if any reasonable person would understand that their threats could be interpreted as verbal terrorism, etc.

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Inside the Feds' All-Out War Against the Latin Kings of Florida | VICE | United States

Inside the Feds' All-Out War Against the Latin Kings of Florida  | VICE | United States | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The intense law-enforcement focus on the Florida criminal organization has resulted in dozens of its members being locked up—and now it's the largest gang in the state prison system.
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Supreme Court overturns Facebook threats case in name of free speech

Supreme Court overturns Facebook threats case in name of free speech | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court ruled in a closely watch case that defines when an online rant is free speech, and when it becomes a criminal threat.
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The Kansas Supreme Court challenged Republicans' agenda. Their solution: Replace the judges.

The Kansas Supreme Court challenged Republicans' agenda. Their solution: Replace the judges. | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Gov. Sam Brownback's tax-slashing crusade threatens to become a full-blown constitutional crisis.

Via Thomas Schmeling
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Rana Plaza Factory Owner to Face Murder Charges

Over 1,100 people died in Bangladesh's worst ever industrial disaster
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Silk Road sentencing: why governments can't win the war on internet drugs

Silk Road sentencing: why governments can't win the war on internet drugs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Dread Pirate Roberts may have been sentenced to life, but experts and customers say the tide has turned and internet markets for illicit products are here to stay

Via Julian Buchanan
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Julian Buchanan's curator insight, June 1, 3:05 AM

Drugs are going to continue to be bought and used - and the internet ‘eBay-type’ service offered greater safety and quality control for purchasers, so all we’ve done is make it more dangerous. How can that be sensible? 

Clay Faris's comment, June 1, 4:48 AM
It isn't sensible. It is a continuation of the failed policies (40+ years now) of the "war on drugs". But you know, hey, let's keep right on pretending that what we do makes a difference. At its core the drug issue is simple economics......law of supply and demand. Prohibition doesn't work.
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In South Africa, continuing racism leads blacks to doubt Mandela's vision

In South Africa, continuing racism leads blacks to doubt Mandela's vision | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Early one weekend morning, just after the nightclubs had closed, three young white men ambled into the harsh fluorescent light of a South African takeout food franchise. They whistled at the staffers, all of them black, tugged their clothing and pulled their caps askew. When customers Sikhulekile Duma and two fellow black students told them to stop, they said people who didn't speak Afrikaans didn't belong there.
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I managed a Washington, D.C., brothel: sex secrets from the nation’s capital

I managed a Washington, D.C., brothel: sex secrets from the nation’s capital | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
I called myself Madam Mike but the escorts rolled their eyes. You'd be surprised by what a usual day was like
Rob Duke's insight:

It's such a tragedy patrolling "photo studios" that rent cameras and "models" to men for a "photo shoot", but strangely no film is even sold there.....

 

Or the sex show booths....

 

All very real and very modern.

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Clay Faris's comment, June 1, 4:26 AM
There is an argument to be made, I believe, that prostitution is a victimless crime......that the "World's Oldest Profession" shouldn't really be illegal at all. I realize that's a bit simplistic, as it avoids many of the very serious issues involved (human trafficking, sex slaves, etc), but there it is. I have always found it an interesting double standard that paying a woman (or man) to have sex with me is illegal, but paying a woman (or man) to have sex with me while I have a camera set up is not. That is porn.
Rob Duke's comment, June 1, 4:32 AM
Clay, yes and Gary Becker (Univ. of Chicago) won a Nobel Prize for asking why we don't consider men and women's marriage, concubinage, serial monogamy, etc. that is often involved in a trade of services (e.g. housework, child rearing, sex) for income (i.e., providing a home, paying utilities, etc.) to be similar to the more straight-forward transaction of sex-for-money. Interestingly, in Muslim cultures to this day (even in places like Iran and Saudi Arabia) a man can arrange a temporary marriage that may last as little as one day. You can hardly blame Becker for pointing out these inconsistencies.
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Can the Sequential Intercept Model help with behavioral health justice? | OUPblog

Can the Sequential Intercept Model help with behavioral health justice? | OUPblog | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There is now pending legislation in the United States Senate and the U.S. House involving the diversion of justice-involved individuals with behavioral health disorders from standard prosecution. Both bills use the Sequential Intercept Model (SIM), developed by Mark Munetz and Patty Griffin in collaboration with Hank Steadman, as an organizing tool to help structure the proposed law. What is the SIM? How can it be used?
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Rotarians with chains on (and a penchant for murder)

Rotarians with chains on (and a penchant for murder) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Motorbike gangs in America date back to the 1940s, when thrill-seeking former soldiers spent their earnings on powerful machines. According to the FBI, there are now more than 300. Some traffick drugs and weapons, and in many parts of the country police claim they are the most violent threat present. In other ways, however, they are more like Rotarians: they also run charity events and attend annual general meetings.

They have spread globally, too. The Justice Department thinks the Bandidos have up to 2,500 members in 14 countries; only the Hells Angels are bigger. Recently they have become infamous in the Netherlands; on May 8th Dutch Bandidos members smashed a café in Sittard. They have been fighting for years with Hells Angels in Germany and Sweden.
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Peter Krieger's comment, May 31, 9:22 PM
I remember hearing about this article and being amazed. I had always heard about biker gangs and "shootouts" from the show Sons of Anarchy, but never thought anything like it would happen in real life. Reading the article and thinking about what happened just blows my mind. The thought of around 200 biker gang members "duking" it out in public is crazy to think about. Obviously there is a lot to consider with rivalries such as in sports, however there is always a line and clearly it was crossed here in Texas. I understand people want to be a part of a biker gang and they decide to believe and act how they may but they are also responsible for their actions. In this case of bail being set at 1 million. Its unfortunate that something like this happened, but hopefully we can prevent something like this from happening in the future.
Vincent Zamora's comment, Today, 2:44 AM
It is things like this that set a bad example and stereo type for those who like to ride bikes, and carry the natural look of a biker, not a thug on two wheels but just a biker. Not all bikers are bad and the sad truth is that the patch most gang MC's where proves it, only 1% of the biker world are criminals and those are usually the ones who where the 1% patch proudly. Most clubs including the hells, bandido's hold charity events and get involved in the community in a positive way. There's a few bad apples in every barrel so to speak but that does not mean the whole barrel is rotten so to speak. But when something like this happens, then its three steps back for every biker enthusiast. Just a shame because there is no way to tell which ones you need to look out for and no to look for as far as individuals go.