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Judge in Whitey Bulger case refuses to step aside

Judge in Whitey Bulger case refuses to step aside | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
BOSTON (AP) — The federal judge presiding over the trial of Boston mobster James "Whitey" Bulger has refused a defense lawyer's request to step down. U.S.
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Mari Freitag's comment, November 5, 2012 12:02 AM
These sorts of issues are so interesting to me, because this happens all the time, and it's so difficult to draw the line where a judge should step aside from a case. Also, nobody has control over what this judge does because he's a federal judge and has his job for life unless he's impeached. Some would probably argue that there's a conflict of interest as soon as the possibility arises, and others would wait for more definitive evidence that there's some sort of conflict. At the US supreme court level, Justice Kagan was faced with a decision leading up to the hearing of the Affordable Care Act. She had been involved with the DOJ as solicitor general during the preparation of the case, before she was appointed to the court. Even if she had no involvement in the preparation of the case (so she says), should she have recused herself from the case? This is just one more example, but it's interesting because it shows the amount of discretion that justices have with their jobs. What worries me is that federal judges can exercise this discretion, and are not necessarily held accountable by anyone at all. At least state judges generally have a form of citizen retention or election to keep them accountable to the law. Anyway, this could have also been just another lawyer trying to shake up the court room hoping for a better environment.
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In defence of spontaneous order

In defence of spontaneous order | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
AMONG the "manifestly silly and occasionally harmful positions" espoused by libertarians, "the idea of spontaneous order might be the silliest and most harmful of...
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How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World

How Breastfeeding Is Viewed Around the World | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Breastfeeding can be a polarizing topic. Views vary not only from person to person, but also country to country, according to a new survey examining women's opinions on breastfeeding.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 12:44 PM

This is just one example of how our opinions, cultural values and sensibilities are shaped by the cultures and places in which we are immersed.  How do normative attitudes shape how people use public space?  How is the body (especially the female body) regulated in public space?   


Tags: perspective, culture, gender.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 1:51 AM

I consider "breastFeeding" totally normal. Some people may think that is wrong that a women feed her baby in a public place, and understand their point, maybe these moms should be a litter more careful where they feed their babies because not everyone had the same cultural values and someone can take it as a offense. 

Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, Today, 2:34 AM
The topic of breastfeeding in public has been a hot debate in the United States recently. The article goes over the view of feeding in public as well as if breastfeeding is the best method for the child. It does come down to a personal choice. It seems like the United States is right in line with other countries as far as social opinion. I would like to know who was the pool for this senses data though? I think it can make a difference in the age group you are asking. It was also interesting the main reasons listed for not doing it was not being educated on how to, as well as the potential pain factor. I think more education on breastfeeding should be conducted instead of just giving a new mother formula to feed the baby. If they cannot breastfeed for medical reasons than that makes sense. However if a mother is able to than they should be informed about it, since it is a healthy option for growing babies. It still comes down to personal choice and cannot be forced on a parent, but should be publicly supported.
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Australian judge says incest may no longer be a taboo - Telegraph

Australian judge says incest may no longer be a taboo  - Telegraph | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Judge in Australia says incest may no longer be a taboo and the only reason it is criminal is potential birth abnormalities, which can be solved by abortion
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Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 27, 4:42 PM

Being pro-life, I have a hard time seeing the logic in deeming the act of incestuous relationships acceptable and decriminalizing them, but considering the result of the act (potential birth abnormalities in babies) the incriminating factor. Furthermore, I cannot morally condone this judge saying "solve this problem with abortions".

 

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He's no longer a prisoner of the war on drugs

He's no longer a prisoner of the war on drugs | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The excitement had been building all day. On election day 2008, every TV in the prison was tuned to the news.
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CSUN Professor Uses Scientific Approach to Understand Religion

CSUN Professor Uses Scientific Approach to Understand Religion | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Few topic generate such heated debate as science and religion, but one professor believes a scientific study of the mind can help us understand religion.
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We'll discuss religion as a major precursor to more advanced institutional arrangement, including the ability to hold together much larger "states".  Is this something hard-wired into humans?

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Alaska legalized weed 39 years ago. Wait, what?

Alaska legalized weed 39 years ago. Wait, what? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
You'll never guess what happened next.
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Joshua Matheny's comment, September 26, 6:29 PM
Interesting read, every once in a while this topic of pot being legal in Alaska (state not federal) gets brought up in various Justice classes and it has always been funny to me that there is never a concrete answer as to why it is only sometimes enforced and not always enforced, or only enforced in certain areas. I really enjoyed the information at the bottom of the page that showcased Alaska's usage rate compared to its dependency rates, really puts things into perspective when we move forward with the bill that is trying to legalize marijuana on a statewide level. I wonder if these laws that have been in limbo will be overrun at that time... I would assume so.
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13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world

13 amazing coming of age traditions from around the world | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

"The transition from childhood to adulthood -- the 'coming of age' of boys who become young men and girls who become young women -- is a significant stepping stone in everyone’s life. But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in.  Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Embarassing or amazing, they were pivotal moments in our lives that deserve remembering. On that note, here are thirteen of it the world’s most diverse coming of age traditions."

 

Tags: gender, folk culture, culture, indigenous, worldwide.


Via Seth Dixon
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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 26, 9:48 AM

This article is interesting in the sense that while marking your transition from childhood to adulthood is an important part into being initiated to society, it is one that also signifies the lack knowledge a child faces before being initiated. While some communities prepare the child for adulthood after their initiation ceremony, others leave the newly initiated to fend for themselves. A child spends several years preparing for their coming of age ceremony. In some communities, little teaching is given to what life is like after the ceremony's over. That's the problem with the Sweet Sixteen coming of age. Adolescents prepare for their sweet sixteen bash and are completely oblivious to the real challenges life has for them long term.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 29, 5:04 PM

Love seeing the many different traditions that people do when coming of age and also traditions in general. Growing up living in the United States my family still followed the many traditions they had where they came from. Both my parents are from Colombia and they brought down many of there family traditions and also world wide Spanish traditions also. For example, my sweet 15 was a very memorable tradition that many young Spanish girls have once they turn 15. Its a big celebration and festivities that are all very much traditional for us. Its interesting learning the traditions others have and learning about new places.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:20 PM

Unit 3

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New police 'drunk and disorderly' powers penalise Aborigines, youth, homeless and mentally ill (NSW)

New police 'drunk and disorderly' powers penalise Aborigines, youth, homeless and mentally ill (NSW) | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
New powers handed to NSW police to tackle alcohol-related violence are disproportionately penalising Aboriginal people, the homeless and the mentally ill, the state Ombudsman has found.
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Alaska TV reporter quits on air to promote pot

Alaska TV reporter quits on air to promote pot | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A reporter for an Alaska TV station revealed on the air that she owns a medical marijuana business and was quitting her job to advocate for the drug.
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Brandon Jensen's comment, October 1, 2:15 AM
I found this video to be kind of comical, I get that she wants to support what she is into, but it was also rather unprofessional. It's always a good idea to stay professional, even if you are about to quit/be fired. I definitely don't think the manner of her departure is hurting her cause, just hurting her chances at a different reporting job down the line, if that is the direction she decides to go.
Kristi Gray's comment, October 1, 4:36 PM
Brandon, I agree that she was very unprofessional!
I think that anyone who watches or reads about the way she quit would be shocked that she would do so in such a way. I would call it both unprofessional and unethical.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, Today, 2:43 AM
This story just makes me think about the saying “there is a time and a place” and I believe she got it wrong. Standing up for something you believe in is correct, but she also had the responsibility to remain professional in the environment she was in. This does not help the cause for legalization of marijuana when the ones representing the cause are using foul language and no professionalism. This is not the example to set for the cause, she had a forum and a platform and she could have turn it into something positive if she had remain intelligent in the way she approached it. Instead I believe she acted childish, and I dislike Alaska being in the headlines for something like this.
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Leaving dead presidents in peace

Leaving dead presidents in peace | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
SINCE cash was invented in the seventh century BC, it has generally been the most convenient way to pay for everyday purchases. But as electronic payments get...
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Getting to "si"

Getting to "si" | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THEY put a brave face on it in Catalonia. The Scottish "no" vote, said Catalan president Artur Mas, was a triumph for democracy and an enviable example of how to...
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A little something for you Comparative Criminology folks...

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Sixx decades ago, Robert K. Merton argued that there was a series of ways in which Americans responded to the extraordinary cultural emphasis that their society placed on getting ahead. The most co...

Sixx decades ago, Robert K. Merton argued that there was a series of ways in which Americans responded to the extraordinary cultural emphasis that their society placed on getting ahead. The most co... | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Gangster’s Guide to Upward Mobility ("Sixx decades ago, Robert K.
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Missionaries accuse Brazil of allowing infanticide - USATODAY.com

Missionaries accuse Brazil of allowing infanticide - USATODAY.com | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The missionaries, associated with the U.S.-based group Youth With A Mission, say the Brazilian government is turning a blind eye to the killing of babies born with birth defects, many of which are treatable by western medicine.
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Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 27, 5:05 PM

I have a sister-in-law who works full time with YWAM - Youth With a Mission. When they go out and build homes for families in extremely impoverished situations, often times they meet kids who are not properly taken care of, and even have seen young kids being responsible for providing food and clothing for their younger siblings. After visiting Africa, I saw first hand the infanticide issues discussed in this article. Many times the parents will put the child with birth defects in a deep well to die, since they don't find value in people with birth defects. There isn't really any legal implications enforced to prevent this from happening, thus perpetuating the problem.

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TG it’s braai day

TG it’s braai day | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
THE braai (Afrikaans for barbecue) is a cornerstone of social life in South Africa. It typically involves a marathon session of drinking, eating dead creatures...
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As they say in Cali: "what's the problem with a braai, brah?"  Well, they would if they knew what a braai is...

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About-face

About-face | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The great sage THE Confucius Institutes programme, an ambitious soft-power effort by China to support education overseas, has been dealt a setback by one of its most...
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Incest Is 'Taboo' but Shouldn't Be Illegal, German Experts Say - NBC News

Incest Is 'Taboo' but Shouldn't Be Illegal, German Experts Say - NBC News | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
MAINZ, Germany -- An advisory board to Germany's government has called for a revision of the country’s incest law, which would end the criminalization of sex...
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Who’s Getting Caught In The “School-to-Prison” Pipeline? And Why?

Who’s Getting Caught In The “School-to-Prison” Pipeline? And Why? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The U.S. prison population is disproportionately black. The same racial disparity can be seen in the students who are punished in the nation’s schools. The connection between these two phenomena are stronger -- and more insidious -- than many may understand.

Via up2-21
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Kristi Gray's comment, October 1, 4:18 PM
This article mentions a few possible theories why black students get in trouble more than white students at school. I believe that the problem of black students getting into more trouble than white students at a much higher rate is due to many, many contributing factors. You can never apply just one theory to a situation. The theories mentioned in this article are having for-profit prison systems, law enforcement “over-police” and see all non-white youth as potential criminals, students that are most likely to be suspended are underachieving students who school officials knowingly and excessively refer to law enforcement, and the lack of financial resources in low-income school districts. I think the order of least likely to most likely of the theories would be in the order I listed them. The only one that I think has the most possibility of being accurate is the last theory.
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Military suicide prevention: lessons from Israel

Military suicide prevention: lessons from Israel | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
News emerged this week that two more Canadian Forces soldiers had taken their own lives. Advocates and military families continue
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Rob Duke's comment, September 25, 2:02 PM
There may be some cross-cultural lessons to be gleaned here...
Brandon Jensen's comment, October 1, 2:52 AM
I think if there is potential to learn more from other countries about how to help people with PTSD, then we should take the opportunity to learn from each other. Combining knowledge can be a powerful tool and there is no real downside to a situation such as this one, when it comes to shared knowledge.
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AK Beat: Alaska too 'weird' to serve as test case for legal marijuana?

AK Beat: Alaska too 'weird' to serve as test case for legal marijuana? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The Washington Post's Wonk Blog broke down issues with Alaska's complicated marijuana laws Wednesday, noting the implications of the Ravin decision, the Alaska Supreme Court ruling that found individual privacy protects the possession of small amounts of marijuana in the home.
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Kristi Gray's comment, October 1, 4:27 PM
This title sure got my attention! Laws regarding marijuana in Alaska are a little confusing. I think it is funny that they would say “Alaska is just weird” in the article. Our state is different, even when it comes to marijuana laws.
Elizabeth Sheppard's comment, Today, 2:55 AM
So Alaskans smoke twice as much weed as other states? The population is still small compared to elsewhere. I think outside resources still don't understand what goes on in Alaska as far as policies and maybe thats why felons like to come to Fairbanks to hide out? It will be interesting to watch what happens in the November election and how the local police departments will respond to the issue. Also in the highly populated areas military members reside and it will still be illegal for them to consume, so will local law enforcement work with military on these issues or just ignore it in general to focus on other cases? So many unanswered questions. Its a wait and watch game.
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Alaska legislative committee reviews progress on crime-reduction bill

Alaska legislative committee reviews progress on crime-reduction bill | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Alaska House and Senate Judiciary Committee members met Monday in Anchorage to discuss “criminal justice reinvestment,” or how the lofty goals set in a crime omnibus bill passed during the legislative session are being addressed.
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Can a "Firewall Strategy" Keep Big Energy Out of Climate Talks? It Worked for Fighting Tobacco

Kicking the polluters out of the negotiations may sound like wishful thinking. But there is a precedent: the global effort to regulate the tobacco industry.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Why Poor Students Struggle

Why Poor Students Struggle | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
The price of success in college is often their own identities.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
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Joshua Matheny's comment, September 26, 6:36 PM
Very interesting, adjustment seems to be the hardest battle for people in lower socioeconomic standings to balance out when faced with a whole new frontier that is college. Going to college at UAF was not even remotely a culture shock for me because I have grown up in the area. I cannot imagine the type of world let's say an Ivy-League college would show me. It would be really hard to acclimate and I may feel just the same way as some of these kids, unsure of my general direction. Money may only be able to buy you things physically, but it is definitely something that carries along with it a culture that will either teach you how to adapt and survive around it, or crumble like the children who have not been raised or acculturated by it.
Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 28, 12:36 AM

My rebuttal to this article is that there are other factors that go into earning a college degree than financial aid or coming from a certain societal group. My husband and I got married at 18. Immediately after our wedding, we both started college life. We both hungered for an education, but were we poor? Absolutely! Have we struggled making it financially with not one but two of us paying our way for housing, books, tuition, general living? You bet. I think the most important key to our educational success has been that we are both motivated and driven.

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How long to be a millionaire

How long to be a millionaire | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
How long does it take to earn $1m in different countries?INFLATION may have ruined "How to marry a millionaire" as a good film title, but there is still something...
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For all you comparative folks...

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Katrina Miller's curator insight, September 28, 12:16 AM

This is an interesting article. It would be helpful for the author to publish where the bulk of the statistics were taken. For example, what age range for earners in the US vs. Romania do they take into account, and how does the average earnings break down by the following categories: [18-24, 24-30, 30-44, 44-56, etc]?

 

Brandon Jensen's comment, October 1, 3:04 AM
It is very interesting to see such a difference number of years from the top of the list to the bottom, I agree that it would also been nice to see a bit more information but it was pretty eye opening, I obviously knew it would take longer in different countries, but the specific amount of years they mentioned was pretty interesting.
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Right on!

Right on! | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
FLYERS at petrol stations do not normally ask for someone to donate a kidney to an unrelated stranger. That such a poster, in a garage in Indiana, actually did...
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When I went in for my surgery, the lady next to me had flown in from the Mariana Islands to give a kidney to a friend--kind of put my surgery in perspective after that....

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The Prevalence Of Criminology And Gang Culture In Muslim Communities - Episode 4 - YouTube

This episode of "The Mardiyah Show" tackles the prevalence of recidivism amongst many Muslims in the Islamic community. Upon release from prison, many Muslim...
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Karmen Louise Tobin's curator insight, September 22, 8:16 PM

 In this video I heard the guest change the wording when he answered the first question that "whether you are Muslim or not Muslim" it is the small things that catch up with you later in life that we seem to ignore. I agree I believe that no matter who you are or what set of beliefs that are in your life everyone falls short of this at one time or another. To me gangs is culture because it is a set of beliefs that people come together on in a set of these beliefs. Muslims, Islamic groups and all of us have a set of behaviors that seem to follow that culture.