Criminology and Economic Theory
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Scientist that discovered GMO health hazards immediately fired, team dismantled

Scientist that discovered GMO health hazards immediately fired, team dismantled | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Is this white collar crime?
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Taylor Altenburg's comment, October 26, 2012 7:34 PM
This article is really interesting. It’s shocking that the researchers were looked down on and fired for finding such health hazards. After watching several documentaries on the food industry it’s kind of gross what actually goes into the process of making and packaging our food. My opinion on this is perhaps the researchers did not necessarily need to take this information right to the media and rather address the head of the companies and work to fix the problem instead of giving the country a major scare about the toxins.
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Allentown police launch app that gives residents a hand in helping them fight crime

Allentown police launch app that gives residents a hand in helping them fight crime | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Unveiled on Wednesday, Allentown police's newest crime-fighting tool is one that will allow residents to take an active role in criminal investigations and neighborhood problems while only lifting a few fingers.
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Oklahoma man killed three teen home intruders using AR-15 rifle

Oklahoma man killed three teen home intruders using AR-15 rifle | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A 23-year-old Oklahoma man used a semi-automatic AR-15 rifle to shoot and kill three masked teenage intruders dressed in black who broke into his home Monday afternoon — an act authorities are investigating as self-defense.

Zach Peters, the homeowner's son, fatally shot an 18-year-old man and two boys ranging between 16 and 17 around 12:30 p.m. The trio allegedly forced their way into the residence through a back door and were killed after exchanging words with Peters, who fired multiple shots.
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Linda Darnell's comment, March 29, 11:41 AM
I am interested to find out the future results of this investigation. Yes, it was kids that were killed however, the article explains that words were exchanged which leads me to believe that the homeowner probably genuinely felt threatened and did not just randomly start firing before assessing the situation.
Angela Webb's comment, March 29, 5:17 PM
I think this is an interesting case because of how young the intruders were. I would believe that this was out of self-defense considering the intruders were carrying weapons and I assume had the intention to use them.
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How fire chiefs and traffic engineers make places less safe

How fire chiefs and traffic engineers make places less safe | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Normal, walkable streets are under attack in Celebration, Florida. The battle threatens your neighborhood, wherever you live.
Rob Duke's insight:
Does place matter? Does the way the built space is laid out matter?

This is a good evaluation and interesting in that it explains and also offers visual images to illustrate.
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Justin Baugh's comment, March 28, 6:27 PM
From an EMS standpoint, it is an accurate point of view because it makes streets unsafe and will increase injuries to the pedestrians on the sidewalks. From a law enforcement standpoint, the removal of tree can help in tracking and possibly help deter crime.
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Lawmakers seek changes to California juvenile justice system

Lawmakers seek changes to California juvenile justice system | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Democratic state senators Holly Mitchell of Los Angeles and Ricardo Lara of Bell Gardens are proposing four bills intended to keep more youthful offenders out of the criminal justice system.
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California prisons to free 9,500 inmates in 4 years

California prisons to free 9,500 inmates in 4 years | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Corrections officials adopted criminal sentencing rules that aim to trim California's prison population by 9,500 inmates in four years.
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Linda Darnell's comment, March 29, 11:45 AM
I feel like California's steps to trim the prison population are steps of restorative justice and I feel that this is a positive step in the right direction. The wording of the headline seems to suggest negative and selfish motives, it seems that the motives are to give prison inmates more options rather than waiting out their sentence and by doing so, the population is trimmed and money is saved. This could just be me being optimistic however.
Angela Webb's comment, March 29, 4:21 PM
I think its a good idea what they are doing. I like that they are trying to push inmates in a positive direction and they are being rewarded for it. I can see why some people would be skeptical about it because these people were placed there for a reason but I believe people can change and people make mistakes. Its good that they are given the opportunity to change their life around.
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Hearing to explore misconduct allegations against ex-O.C. prosecutors

Hearing to explore misconduct allegations against ex-O.C. prosecutors | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A Superior Court judge wants to dig deeper into allegations of misconduct by two former county prosecutors in a murder case against a construction worker
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Police superintendent meets with Sessions, gets no promise of federal aid

Police superintendent meets with Sessions, gets no promise of federal aid | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Sessions said he didn't want to make promises he couldn't keep at a time of proposed cuts to the Justice Department budget, according to one participant.
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Khalid Masood: From popular teen to murderous extremist

Khalid Masood: From popular teen to murderous extremist | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Khalid Masood carried out the deadliest terror attack in London in years. Born in Britain, he had a string of convictions for violence but not terrorism offenses. A fuller picture is emerging of the 52-year-old who killed four people.
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One Woman's Immortal Cells Have Saved Hundreds of Thousands of Lives

One Woman's Immortal Cells Have Saved Hundreds of Thousands of Lives | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Henrietta Lacks's cells laid the foundation for many modern medical discoveries.
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For the forensics folks out there...
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Joshua Vey's comment, March 28, 5:48 PM
Pretty amazing how someone's cells can make others better. This was the start of some groundbreaking medical science.
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Colorado cold-case homicide suspect arrested in South Dakota

Julian Pena-Morales was arrested in Ipswich this week after seven years on the run from law enforcement.
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Angela Webb's comment, March 29, 6:56 PM

I think this case is very interesting because of how long it took to find him. I think it’s good that they have him on a very high bond. He was found in south Dakota when the crime was committed in Colorado. Its amazing how long people can run from the authorities.
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The incarcerated workforce: Prison labour is a billion-dollar industry, with uncertain returns for inmates | The Economist

The incarcerated workforce: Prison labour is a billion-dollar industry, with uncertain returns for inmates | The Economist | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it

SILICON VALLEY mavens seldom stumble into San Quentin, a notorious Californian prison. But when Chris Redlitz, a venture capitalist, visited seven years ago, he found that many of the inmates were keen and savvy businessmen. The trip spurred him to create The Last Mile, a charity that teaches San Quentin inmates how to start businesses and code websites, for which they can earn up to $17 an hour. One of the first people it helped was Tulio Cardozo, who served a five-year sentence after a botched attempt at cooking hashish, which also left him with severe burns across half his body. Two years after he was released, he got a job as a lead developer in a San Francisco startup.

Such redemptive stories are the model for what the prison system could be. But they are exceptions—the rule is much drearier. Prison labour is legally required in America. Most convicted inmates either work for nothing or for pennies at menial tasks that seem unlikely to boost their job prospects. At the federal level, the Bureau of Prisons operates a programme known as Federal Prison Industries that pays inmates roughly $0.90 an hour to produce everything from mattresses, spectacles,road signs and body armour for other government agencies, earning $500m in sales in fiscal 2016. Prisoners have produced official seals for the Department of Defence and Department of State, a bureau spokesman confirmed. In many prisons, the hourly wage is less than the cost of a chocolate bar at the commissary, yet the waiting list remains long—the programme still pays much more than the $0.12-0.40 earned for an hour of kitchen work.


Similar schemes exist at the state level as well, making the market of 61,000 captive labourers worth well over $1bn. California’s programme expects to generate $232m in sales this year, much of it from construction and textiles, though $10m is also expected from meat-cutting. In Idaho, prisoners roast potatoes. In Kentucky, they sell $1m worth of cattle.

Critics have spent years directing their anger towards private prisons, by pointing out the moral hazard created when profiting from punishment. Jeff Sessions, the attorney-general, caused a stir last month when he cancelled an Obama-era directive to phase out federal contracting with private prison companies, which expect bumper earnings under Donald Trump. The share price for CoreCivic, the rebranded name of the Corrections Corporation of America, shot up by 43% in a single day after Mr Trump was elected, in anticipation of lucrative contracts to run immigration detention centres.

But those who attack the new prison-industrial complex might be surprised to learn that America’s publicly run prisons have been providing labour for private companies since 1979. More than 5,000 inmates take part in the scheme, known as “Prison Industry Enhancement”. “Orange is the New Black”, a television show set in a women’s prison, recently lampooned a private-prison takeover, after which the inmates are forced to sew lingerie for $1 an hour. But this gets the history only half right. Female inmates did indeed make lingerie for brands like Victoria’s Secret in the 1990s—but only through a deal between South Carolina’s public prisons and a private manufacturer.

America’s prison-labour industry is wrapped in euphemism. Federal Prison Industries does business under the more palatable name of UNICOR, and government-run prison production schemes are called “correctional industries”. Some slogans are better than others; UNICOR has an unfortunate habit of calling its facilities “factories with fences” in reports.

Employment upon release is perhaps the best defence against recidivism. The chief justification for prison labour is that it both defeats idleness and gives inmates marketable skills. Whether it actually does so is unclear. “The vast majority of prison labour is not even cloaked in the idea of rehabilitation,” says Heather Thompson of the University of Michigan. Simple manufacturing jobs, like the ones done cheaply by most inmates, have already left the country. The study pushed by the Bureau of Prisons, showing drops in reoffending, was published in 1996. More recent comparison statistics often ignore bias in how those being studied are chosen. Rigorous academic work on the subject is almost non-existent.

Still, such programmes are undoubtedly legal. The Thirteenth Amendment to the constitution prohibits slavery and indentured servitude—“except as a punishment for crime”. 

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Kyle Green's comment, March 25, 3:10 AM
Interesting moral question.

Just because inmates are in prison for their crimes, is it right to profit off them? To profit off of another human being? What if the profits were turned back into the prison system to subsidize the billons of dollars it costs to run it? Does that make it okay?

I feel that profiting off of another person’s plight, no matter what that plight might be, is wrong, especially if the person is not getting anything in return; as in this case some sort of real, relevant, and marketable job skills (thus providing an opportunity to social rehabilitation).

Stamping license plates, sewing body armor or mattresses, hardly gives any sort of relevant and marketable job skills for someone with the label and stigma of “Ex-Con.” So when they finish their time and are thrust back out into society even more disadvantaged than before doing their time, they probably don’t have the means to move on and get out of the plight that most likely led them into prison to begin with.

All while super prison executives enjoy that dollar or two of potential opportunity, misplaced into their pockets.
Eric Villasenor's comment, March 27, 4:43 PM
I worked as a correctional officer in a prison. Inmates are given housing, food, education, clothing and many other basic needs at no cost to them. Many of these these things(if not all) are costly to us citizens(not to mention, our tax dollars pay for those inmate services!). They are earning a similar wage to citizens who are not imprisoned when all facts are considered.
Brennan D Watson's comment, March 27, 4:44 PM
I did not know that the 13th amendment allows for someone to be sentenced to slavery as a punishment. Prison labor is fine with me I do not feel that it is wrong. I do feel like there need to be defined goals for the work though are people repaying their debt to society or are they learning job skills.
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Man Indicted for Using GIF as 'Deadly Weapon'

Man Indicted for Using GIF as 'Deadly Weapon' | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A cyberstalking case against a Maryland man is notable both for how the jury considered a seizure-inducing GIF and how the FBI caught the perpetrator.
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Brennan D Watson's comment, March 27, 2:51 PM
I was very impressed with the length to which the FBI went to track this person. Seems like the guy that did this was trying to cause this guy some pretty serious injury.
Joshua Vey's comment, March 28, 5:52 PM
Cyberstalking is a serious issue and most people seem like they can get away with it. However, the FBI has gotten really good at tracking these kinds of people down.
Justin Baugh's comment, March 28, 6:39 PM
its sad that someone went to that length to hurt someone just because they didn't like what one person posted on social media.
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Attorney David Yates: More former Explorers alleging abuse by police

Attorney David Yates says one of the new accusers is the Scout from 2013 investigation of former Officer Kenneth Betts
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Aggressive ICE tactics making Latino crime victims fearful to come forward

Aggressive ICE tactics making Latino crime victims fearful to come forward | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Calif. Chief Justice warns that aggressive ICE enforcement at courthouses leading to drop in reporting
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I agree that this tends to push the immigrants into the arms of the gangs and cartels...
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Assemblyman Ian Calderon’s bill would require jailing of offenders who violate probation three times

Assemblyman Ian Calderon’s bill would require jailing of offenders who violate probation three times | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
WHITTIER >> Standing in front of City Hall adjacent to the Whittier Police Memorial Thursday, Assemblyman Ian Calderon introduced a bill that would require jailing probationers who violate the terms of their supervision at least three times.
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2 jailhouse snitches, who were paid $335,000 over 4 years, spark new legislation

2 jailhouse snitches, who were paid $335,000 over 4 years, spark new legislation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
“Puppet” and “Bouncer,” a pair of jailhouse snitches who were paid $335,000 over a four-year window for working dozens of cases in
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Debate Over Silencers: Hearing Protection Or Public Safety Threat?

Debate Over Silencers: Hearing Protection Or Public Safety Threat? | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Legislation would loosen restrictions on gun suppressors, with proponents saying quieter guns protect shooters' hearing. But opponents say easier-to-get silencers are a risk to the public.
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Justin Baugh's comment, March 28, 6:44 PM
whether or not people have silencers, criminals will still commit crimes with firearms. Law abiding citizens who have legally own guns should not be penalized for the criminals of the world
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Carlsbad to photograph cars entering city

Carlsbad to photograph cars entering city | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Carlsbad to expand automated surveillance with police purchase
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Upland homicide suspect was on local supervision with county probation

Upland homicide suspect was on local supervision with county probation | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
UPLAND >> The man accused of fatally shooting a Rancho Cucamonga man in Upland was being supervised by San Bernardino County Probation when the deadly attack took place, officials said.After serving time for assault, Anthony Christopher M
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Linda Darnell's comment, March 29, 11:46 AM
This is one situation in which attempts at a more restorative approach ended in the worst possible way. You never know when you are passing down sentencing whether or not you have made the wrong decision by allowing someone some freedom, this is why a judge's job is one of the most difficult in our nation.
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Disbarred lawyer to face sentencing for kidnapping California cops once called hoax

Disbarred lawyer to face sentencing for kidnapping California cops once called hoax | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A disbarred Harvard University-trained attorney faces decades in prison during his sentencing Thursday for a kidnapping so elaborate and bizarre that police in California initially dismissed it as a hoax.
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Weird case...
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Officer helps design tracker to aid police in finding stolen devices

Officer helps design tracker to aid police in finding stolen devices | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
A police officer and a group of developers have come up with a device that makes it easier to track and locate devices that have Wi-Fi.
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'Deaths of despair' fuel white midlife mortality

'Deaths of despair' fuel white midlife mortality | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
It's a midlife crisis of a different sort: "Deaths of despair" -- due to drugs, alcohol and suicide -- are largely responsible for rising mortality rates among middle-age white Americans. And a new analysis by Princeton economists delves into what they believe is behind this trend.
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The Imprisoner’s Dilemma

The Imprisoner’s Dilemma | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
There are 2.3 million Americans in prison or jail. The U.S. has 5 percent of the world’s population but 25 percent of its prisoners. One in three black men can …
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DS's comment, March 24, 3:06 PM
Correlation; in most states mass incarceration is not reflecting a large enough decrease in crime. Causation; crime causes incarceration but the desired effects are not seen. Per this article, the regression model show diminishing returns. In AK crime & incarceration have both increased. In CA, the realignment program has shown some success. Non-custodial & monetary sanctions are a more civilized way to treat offenders. EM & control of freedom, plus confiscation and forfeiture are alternatives.
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Manhunts Underway After Shootings Outside Calif. High School

Manhunts Underway After Shootings Outside Calif. High School | Criminology and Economic Theory | Scoop.it
Gang violence is suspected after a student and three teens were injured in two separate shootings.
Rob Duke's insight:
I was Chief right next door in Greenfield in the mid-1990's....the dividing line between the north and south gangs is right at King City, thus lots of gang violence.
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DS's comment, March 24, 3:35 PM
Campus Safety, Magazine "Identifying Pre-Attack Indicators" Sounds like Pre-Crime 'substantive coercive state interventions targeted at non-imminent crimes' Minority Report, or Thought Crime in Eric Blair's.1984. Apparently DHS has something like this going on, don't forget to check with the precogs. Of course their is a "Legal Drawback."